hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 466 0 Browse Search
Doc 320 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 206 6 Browse Search
A. H. Foote 201 9 Browse Search
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) 185 3 Browse Search
A. E. Burnside 176 4 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 169 5 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 167 9 Browse Search
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 162 10 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 156 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 52 total hits in 22 results.

1 2 3
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 116
Doc. 112.-Colonel Roberts' exploit. Flag-officer Foote's report. United States Flag steamer Benton, off Island No.10, April 2, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: last night an armed boat expedition was fitted out from the squadron and the land forces at this point, under command of Col. Roberts, of the Forty-second Illinois regiment. The five boats comprising the expedition were in charge of First Master J. V. Johnson, of the St. Louis, assisted by Fourth Master G. Pervice, had it been required, to the fulfilment of the object of the expedition. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, etc., your servant, A. H. Foote, Flag-Officer. Chicago Tribune account. on board steamer V. F. Wilson, off Island no.10, April 2, 1862. The fleet this morning is exulting over a most daring and brilliant exploit, performed last night by Col. Roberts, of the Forty-second Illinois, at the head of a small expedition. In order to appreciate more thoroughly its
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 116
little party embarked. The flag-officer and his subordinates, with Col. Buford, stood upon the deck of the Benton, giving the final orders. The yawls set out on their perilous journey, and they retired anxiously to await the result. Col. Roberts had previously made several very close reconnoissances at night by pulling through the overflowed brush, and had ascertained the locality of the battery. The boats were manned as follows: St. Louis cutter, John V. Johnson, commander. Cincinnati cutter, John Pierce, commander. Benton cutter, Geo. P. Lord, commander. Mound City cutter,----Scoville, commander. Pittsburgh cutter,----, commander. Each of the cutters also carried a coxswain, and was manned by ten men. The boats were all in charge of First Master Johnson, of the St. Louis. The soldiers were picked men of company A, each man armed with a five-shooter Colt rifle. The following was the plan laid out: The boats were to approach the battery in line, pulling s
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 116
lity of the battery. The boats were manned as follows: St. Louis cutter, John V. Johnson, commander. Cincinnati cutter, John Pierce, commander. Benton cutter, Geo. P. Lord, commander. Mound City cutter,----Scoville, commander. Pittsburgh cutter,----, commander. Each of the cutters also carried a coxswain, and was manned by ten men. The boats were all in charge of First Master Johnson, of the St. Louis. The soldiers were picked men of company A, each man armed with a five-shooter Colt rifle. The following was the plan laid out: The boats were to approach the battery in line, pulling slowly till at the point of the bar, after which, when five hundred yards, the St. Louis, Benton, and Pittsburgh, should run abreast, the Cincinnati and Mound City in the rear as reserves; and this plan was carried out to the very letter. With muffled oars, and under cover of the friendly darkness, the boats advanced cautiously along the edge of the bank. Owing to the furious vio
Mound City (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 116
pon the deck of the Benton, giving the final orders. The yawls set out on their perilous journey, and they retired anxiously to await the result. Col. Roberts had previously made several very close reconnoissances at night by pulling through the overflowed brush, and had ascertained the locality of the battery. The boats were manned as follows: St. Louis cutter, John V. Johnson, commander. Cincinnati cutter, John Pierce, commander. Benton cutter, Geo. P. Lord, commander. Mound City cutter,----Scoville, commander. Pittsburgh cutter,----, commander. Each of the cutters also carried a coxswain, and was manned by ten men. The boats were all in charge of First Master Johnson, of the St. Louis. The soldiers were picked men of company A, each man armed with a five-shooter Colt rifle. The following was the plan laid out: The boats were to approach the battery in line, pulling slowly till at the point of the bar, after which, when five hundred yards, the St. Louis,
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 116
Doc. 112.-Colonel Roberts' exploit. Flag-officer Foote's report. United States Flag steamer Benton, off Island No.10, April 2, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: last night an armed boat expedition was fitted out from the squadron and the land forces at this point, under command of Col. Roberts, of the Forty-second Illinois regiment. The five boats comprising the expedition were in charge of First Master J. V. Johnson, of the St. Louis, assisted by Fourth Master G. P. Lord, of the Benton; Fourth Master Pierce, of the Cincinnati; Fourth Master Morgan, of the Pittsburgh, and Master's Mate Scamill, of the Mound City, each with a boat's crew of ten men from their respective vessels, carrying in all one hundred men, exclusive of officers, under the command of Col. Roberts. At midnight the boats reached the upper or No. Ten fort, and, pulling directly on its face, carried it, receiving only the harmless fire of two sentinels, who ran on discharging their mus
Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 116
Doc. 112.-Colonel Roberts' exploit. Flag-officer Foote's report. United States Flag steamer Benton, off Island No.10, April 2, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: last night an armed boat expedition was fitted out from the squadron and the land forces at this point, under command of Col. Roberts, of the Forty-second Illinois regiment. The five boats comprising the expedition were in charge of First Master J. V. Johnson, of the St. Louis, assisted by Fourth Master G. P. Lord, of the Benton; Fourth Master Pierce, of the Cincinnati; Fourth Master Morgan, of the Pittsburgh, and Master's Mate Scamill, of the Mound City, each with a boat's crew of ten men from their respective vessels, carrying in all one hundred men, exclusive of officers, under the command of Col. Roberts. At midnight the boats reached the upper or No. Ten fort, and, pulling directly on its face, carried it, receiving only the harmless fire of two sentinels, who ran on discharging their musk
John H. Morgan (search for this): chapter 116
United States Flag steamer Benton, off Island No.10, April 2, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: last night an armed boat expedition was fitted out from the squadron and the land forces at this point, under command of Col. Roberts, of the Forty-second Illinois regiment. The five boats comprising the expedition were in charge of First Master J. V. Johnson, of the St. Louis, assisted by Fourth Master G. P. Lord, of the Benton; Fourth Master Pierce, of the Cincinnati; Fourth Master Morgan, of the Pittsburgh, and Master's Mate Scamill, of the Mound City, each with a boat's crew of ten men from their respective vessels, carrying in all one hundred men, exclusive of officers, under the command of Col. Roberts. At midnight the boats reached the upper or No. Ten fort, and, pulling directly on its face, carried it, receiving only the harmless fire of two sentinels, who ran on discharging their muskets, while the rebel troops in the vicinity rapidly retreated; whereupon C
Doc. 112.-Colonel Roberts' exploit. Flag-officer Foote's report. United States Flag steamer Benton, off Island No.10, April 2, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: last night an armed boat expedition was fitted out from the squadron and the land forces at this point, under command of Col. Roberts, of the Forty-second Illinois regiment. The five boats comprising the expedition were in charge of First Master J. V. Johnson, of the St. Louis, assisted by Fourth Master G. P. Lord, of the Benton; Fourth Master Pierce, of the Cincinnati; Fourth Master Morgan, of the Pittsburgh, and Master's Mate Scamill, of the Mound City, each with a boat's crew of ten men from their respective vessels, carrying in all one hundred men, exclusive of officers, under the command of Col. Roberts. At midnight the boats reached the upper or No. Ten fort, and, pulling directly on its face, carried it, receiving only the harmless fire of two sentinels, who ran on discharging their musk
onnoissances at night by pulling through the overflowed brush, and had ascertained the locality of the battery. The boats were manned as follows: St. Louis cutter, John V. Johnson, commander. Cincinnati cutter, John Pierce, commander. Benton cutter, Geo. P. Lord, commander. Mound City cutter,----Scoville, commander. Pittsburgh cutter,----, commander. Each of the cutters also carried a coxswain, and was manned by ten men. The boats were all in charge of First Master Johnson, of company A, each man armed with a five-shooter Colt rifle. The following was the plan laid out: The boats were to approach the battery in line, pulling slowly till at the point of the bar, after which, when five hundred yards, the St. Louis, Benton, and Pittsburgh, should run abreast, the Cincinnati and Mound City in the rear as reserves; and this plan was carried out to the very letter. With muffled oars, and under cover of the friendly darkness, the boats advanced cautiously along the
S. L. Phelps (search for this): chapter 116
t was growing more and more precarious, when fortunately, after drifting about a quarter of a mile, she struck against the Cincinnati and was made fast until morning. The storm lasted about four hours, raging with terrible vehemence, and tossing the steamers about on the mad waves like cockle-shells. Luckily the Swallow was the only one blown from her moorings. It was during the height of this storm that Col. Roberts performed his daring mission. Yesterday morning, the flag-officer, Capt. Phelps, Col. Buford, Secretary Scott, and other officers, held a conference upon the flag-ship, at which it was decided to make a night reconnoissance of the upper battery, the details of which were left to Col. Buford. He selected Col. Roberts and forty picked men of his regiment to be the chosen few. Each gunboat furnished a yawl, manned by six of their hardiest seamen. At two o'clock, in the thickest of the storm, the little party embarked. The flag-officer and his subordinates, with Col.
1 2 3