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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 22
The vessel is on the principle of a life-boat, in the respect of the waterproof deck; and it is believed that it will live in a sea where a common vessel would swamp. It is expected to attain a speed with her of eight knots an hour. There have been only one hundred working days since the date of the contract for this battery. There has been only one establishment engaged in turning out the immense armor-plate, that of Abbott & Son, of Baltimore. If any other establishment could have been employed in this, the work might have been completed even sooner. The manufactory of Abbott & Son has been wholly given up to this work. Other portions of the plating have been made by Messrs. Corning, Winslow & Co., and Holdane & Co. Still the rapidity with which it has been completed shows what the country is capable of, if its energies were aroused. It is stated that the speed with which the work has been carried on would have been utterly impossible in England. --N. Y. World, January 31.
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
t it, will pass over it as in the case of a raft. The vessel is on the principle of a life-boat, in the respect of the waterproof deck; and it is believed that it will live in a sea where a common vessel would swamp. It is expected to attain a speed with her of eight knots an hour. There have been only one hundred working days since the date of the contract for this battery. There has been only one establishment engaged in turning out the immense armor-plate, that of Abbott & Son, of Baltimore. If any other establishment could have been employed in this, the work might have been completed even sooner. The manufactory of Abbott & Son has been wholly given up to this work. Other portions of the plating have been made by Messrs. Corning, Winslow & Co., and Holdane & Co. Still the rapidity with which it has been completed shows what the country is capable of, if its energies were aroused. It is stated that the speed with which the work has been carried on would have been utterly
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Doc. 23.-launch of Ericsson's battery. New-York, Jan. 31, 1862. The Ericsson Floating Battery, for the United States Government, was yesterday safely launched from the Continental Iron Works, Greenpoint, where it has been building for the last three months. The launch took place at about ten o'clock in the morning. Notwithstanding the early hour, the drizzling rain, the wretched state of travelling in the streets, and the fact that no notice had been given of the intended event, a very large crowd had collected along the wharf, consisting of workmen, residents of the neighborhood, and many persons of prominence in naval affairs, who had watched the undertaking with interest from its inception. In consequence of the novel construction of the vessel, and the vast amount of iron upon her, there was much anxiety felt as to the possibility of making her float, and it was strenuously maintained by many — and bets were offered and taken on the question — that she would sink as ce
Knickerbocker (search for this): chapter 22
turret will be eight or nine inches thick on every side, but in addition to this Capt. Ericsson will place on the side in which the two port-holes are bored, which will of course be toward the enemy and will receive a large proportion of the enemy's shot, an additional thickness or shield of two inches of iron, so that on the fighting side the turret will present a thickness of eleven inches of wrought iron. The gunner inside a defence of this character will feel as secure as an ancient Knickerbocker in his easy-chair, while heavy balls are striking all about him, within a few feet outside, with all the force which the enemy's best guns can give them. A shell-proof flat roof of perforated plateiron, placed on forged beams inserted six inches down the cylinder, covers the top. Several sliding hatches in this give access to the turret from outside. The sides of the turret are perforated with holes of an inch diameter, to give light, and are useful, in case the battery is boarded, for
The vessel is on the principle of a life-boat, in the respect of the waterproof deck; and it is believed that it will live in a sea where a common vessel would swamp. It is expected to attain a speed with her of eight knots an hour. There have been only one hundred working days since the date of the contract for this battery. There has been only one establishment engaged in turning out the immense armor-plate, that of Abbott & Son, of Baltimore. If any other establishment could have been employed in this, the work might have been completed even sooner. The manufactory of Abbott & Son has been wholly given up to this work. Other portions of the plating have been made by Messrs. Corning, Winslow & Co., and Holdane & Co. Still the rapidity with which it has been completed shows what the country is capable of, if its energies were aroused. It is stated that the speed with which the work has been carried on would have been utterly impossible in England. --N. Y. World, January 31.
Doc. 23.-launch of Ericsson's battery. New-York, Jan. 31, 1862. The Ericsson Floating Battery, for the United States Government, was yesterday safely launched from the Continental Iron Works, Greenpoint, where it has been building for the last three months. The launch took place at about ten o'clock in the morning. Notwithstanding the early hour, the drizzling rain, the wretched state of travelling in the streets, and the fact that no notice had been given of the intended event, a very large crowd had collected along the wharf, consisting of workmen, residents of the neighborhood, and many persons of prominence in naval affairs, who had watched the undertaking with interest from its inception. In consequence of the novel construction of the vessel, and the vast amount of iron upon her, there was much anxiety felt as to the possibility of making her float, and it was strenuously maintained by many — and bets were offered and taken on the question — that she would sink as c
The vessel is on the principle of a life-boat, in the respect of the waterproof deck; and it is believed that it will live in a sea where a common vessel would swamp. It is expected to attain a speed with her of eight knots an hour. There have been only one hundred working days since the date of the contract for this battery. There has been only one establishment engaged in turning out the immense armor-plate, that of Abbott & Son, of Baltimore. If any other establishment could have been employed in this, the work might have been completed even sooner. The manufactory of Abbott & Son has been wholly given up to this work. Other portions of the plating have been made by Messrs. Corning, Winslow & Co., and Holdane & Co. Still the rapidity with which it has been completed shows what the country is capable of, if its energies were aroused. It is stated that the speed with which the work has been carried on would have been utterly impossible in England. --N. Y. World, January 31.
Greenpoint (search for this): chapter 22
Doc. 23.-launch of Ericsson's battery. New-York, Jan. 31, 1862. The Ericsson Floating Battery, for the United States Government, was yesterday safely launched from the Continental Iron Works, Greenpoint, where it has been building for the last three months. The launch took place at about ten o'clock in the morning. Notwithstanding the early hour, the drizzling rain, the wretched state of travelling in the streets, and the fact that no notice had been given of the intended event, a very large crowd had collected along the wharf, consisting of workmen, residents of the neighborhood, and many persons of prominence in naval affairs, who had watched the undertaking with interest from its inception. In consequence of the novel construction of the vessel, and the vast amount of iron upon her, there was much anxiety felt as to the possibility of making her float, and it was strenuously maintained by many — and bets were offered and taken on the question — that she would sink as ce
to the main bulkhead of the vessel. A spur-wheel, six and a half inches in diameter, eleven inch face, moved by a double-cylinder engine, turns the turret around and the guns as well, directing them to any point of the compass. A rod connected with the reversing gear of the engine will enable the gunner to control the aim, so that one officer has charge of both turret and guns, and the greatest possible accuracy may be attained in firing. The armament of the vessel will consist of two Dahlgren guns of the heaviest calibre. They will be parallel, and the turning of the turret will give them their direction. The two port-holes are within about two feet of each other on the same side, and about three feet from the deck. The guns will move on forged iron slides across the turret, the carriages, which are wrought iron, being made to fit them accurately. When the gun is run in for loading, a pendulum of wrought iron will fall over the port-holes, so that no ball can enter. The gun
A. H. Abbott (search for this): chapter 22
ed to attain a speed with her of eight knots an hour. There have been only one hundred working days since the date of the contract for this battery. There has been only one establishment engaged in turning out the immense armor-plate, that of Abbott & Son, of Baltimore. If any other establishment could have been employed in this, the work might have been completed even sooner. The manufactory of Abbott & Son has been wholly given up to this work. Other portions of the plating have been maemployed in this, the work might have been completed even sooner. The manufactory of Abbott & Son has been wholly given up to this work. Other portions of the plating have been made by Messrs. Corning, Winslow & Co., and Holdane & Co. Still the rapidity with which it has been completed shows what the country is capable of, if its energies were aroused. It is stated that the speed with which the work has been carried on would have been utterly impossible in England. --N. Y. World, January 31.
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