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New Bedford (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
tering a Spanish port. The marines on board are all Irish, and they add, that of forty-three prisoners on board on arrival at Cadiz, all the negroes, who formed a large proportion of them, were retained as a part of the crew of the Confederate steamer. As each of the captains relates circumstances somewhat different from the other, we shall take each in turn, and first of Capt. Hoxie. His vessel, the Eben Dodge, was one thousand two hundred and twenty-two tons, and belonged to New-Bedford, United States, whence she sailed on the twenty-sixth of November last, on a whaling voyage to the South-Pacific. She was provisioned and provided, in all respects, for a three years voyage, and had a large store of water. Her crew had three years clothing, and the findings of the ship and crew were all of the best. On December eighth, in latitude sixty-one degrees north, longitude fifty degrees west, about ten o'clock A. M., weather thick, a steamer hove in sight, showing American colors, and
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 25
er visited Cadiz recently, put them on shore there, whence they have been forwarded to this port by the American Consul there, and hence they propose returning to America by the Canadian steamer Bohemian. They describe the Sumter as a very indifferent screw propeller of about five hundred tons. She is armed with four short thirtyo the cabin, where he found Capt. Semmes. Having examined the papers, the Sumter's commander said: Oh! yes, it's all right; she is the lawful prize of the Confederate States, and I shall burn the ship. He next observed, I am short of water, and you have plenty, I must have some of that; and he forthwith ordered Capt. Hoxie to gy took away the ship's papers, and Capt. Minott on board the steamer; and after examining the papers, Capt. Semmes declared the Vigilant lawful prize to the Confederate States, adding that he should burn her. He then gave permission to Capt. Minott to fetch the customary trunk of clothes and bed, and the usual equipments for the o
Liverpool (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 25
Doc. 26.-the Sumter at sea: the Captains she captured. Liverpool, Eng., February 4, 1862. On Sunday night last, the Spanish steamer Duero arrived in Liverpool from Cadiz, having as passengers on board three gentlemen, late in command of different American ships, all of which had been captured by the Confederate steamer Sumter, and burned at sea. The captains are Minott, late of the Vigilant, Smith, of the Arcade, and Hoxie, of the Eben Dodge. They were the prisoners of Capt. Semmes,Liverpool from Cadiz, having as passengers on board three gentlemen, late in command of different American ships, all of which had been captured by the Confederate steamer Sumter, and burned at sea. The captains are Minott, late of the Vigilant, Smith, of the Arcade, and Hoxie, of the Eben Dodge. They were the prisoners of Capt. Semmes, who, when the Sumter visited Cadiz recently, put them on shore there, whence they have been forwarded to this port by the American Consul there, and hence they propose returning to America by the Canadian steamer Bohemian. They describe the Sumter as a very indifferent screw propeller of about five hundred tons. She is armed with four short thirty — two--pounder guns and one sixty — eight-pounder pivot-gun. She is amply provided with small arms, has abundance of ammunition, and abundance of
Portland (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
Sumter as filthy, and complains that he was detailed to a berth among the petty officers of the ship; but apart from these inconveniences he had no other cause of complaint, save forcible detention, denudation of cash and property, and destruction of his ship. In this respect his companions give concurrent testimony. We should add that one of the boats of the Eben Dodge was also taken, by the Sumter. Capt. Smith, of the schooner Arcade, one hundred and twenty-two tons, belonging to Portland, Me., sailed thence on the tenth of November, with a cargo of molasses, for Guadaloupe. On the twentieth of that month, at two o'clock in the afternoon, being in latitude twenty degrees thirty-five minutes north, longitude fifty-seven degrees twelve minutes west, the steamer Sumter, bearing the American ensign, bore up, and sent an armed boat's crew on board the Arcade. The crew took Capt. Smith on board the Sumter, along with the ship's papers, charts, chronometer, etc., announced her a la
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
e must be burned. All the valuables, however, were first taken off. Capt. Smith was informed that he must confine his equipment, on removal, to a bed and trunk of clothes, and his men to a bag each; and this having been arranged, and the men brought on board the Confederate steamer, the Arcade was fired. Capt. Smith having only five dollars on him when questioned, was allowed to retain it. Capt. Minott, of the Vigilant, six hundred and fifty-two tons, belonged to Bath, Me., sailed from New-York, on the twenty-first November, for Falmouth, for orders. On December third, about nine A. M., in latitude twenty-nine degrees twelve minutes north, longitude fifty — seven degrees twenty minutes west, a steamer, having the French ensign hoisted, hove in sight, came rapidly up, and proved to be, as Capt. Minott conjectured, the Sumter. The Vigilant was ordered to heave to, and two armed boat's crews were sent on board. They took away the ship's papers, and Capt. Minott on board the steame
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
r, were first taken off. Capt. Smith was informed that he must confine his equipment, on removal, to a bed and trunk of clothes, and his men to a bag each; and this having been arranged, and the men brought on board the Confederate steamer, the Arcade was fired. Capt. Smith having only five dollars on him when questioned, was allowed to retain it. Capt. Minott, of the Vigilant, six hundred and fifty-two tons, belonged to Bath, Me., sailed from New-York, on the twenty-first November, for Falmouth, for orders. On December third, about nine A. M., in latitude twenty-nine degrees twelve minutes north, longitude fifty — seven degrees twenty minutes west, a steamer, having the French ensign hoisted, hove in sight, came rapidly up, and proved to be, as Capt. Minott conjectured, the Sumter. The Vigilant was ordered to heave to, and two armed boat's crews were sent on board. They took away the ship's papers, and Capt. Minott on board the steamer; and after examining the papers, Capt. Sem
Bath, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
due form, and that she must be burned. All the valuables, however, were first taken off. Capt. Smith was informed that he must confine his equipment, on removal, to a bed and trunk of clothes, and his men to a bag each; and this having been arranged, and the men brought on board the Confederate steamer, the Arcade was fired. Capt. Smith having only five dollars on him when questioned, was allowed to retain it. Capt. Minott, of the Vigilant, six hundred and fifty-two tons, belonged to Bath, Me., sailed from New-York, on the twenty-first November, for Falmouth, for orders. On December third, about nine A. M., in latitude twenty-nine degrees twelve minutes north, longitude fifty — seven degrees twenty minutes west, a steamer, having the French ensign hoisted, hove in sight, came rapidly up, and proved to be, as Capt. Minott conjectured, the Sumter. The Vigilant was ordered to heave to, and two armed boat's crews were sent on board. They took away the ship's papers, and Capt. Min
vided with small arms, has abundance of ammunition, and abundance of provisions of kinds, as may be expected from her helping herself so plentifully from various sources. Her crew, when she entered Cadiz harbor, was ninety-nine, all told, mostly Irish, but with a slight intermixutre of English. The captains say, that the crew are very discontented, and that eleven deserted on entering a Spanish port. The marines on board are all Irish, and they add, that of forty-three prisoners on board on Irish, and they add, that of forty-three prisoners on board on arrival at Cadiz, all the negroes, who formed a large proportion of them, were retained as a part of the crew of the Confederate steamer. As each of the captains relates circumstances somewhat different from the other, we shall take each in turn, and first of Capt. Hoxie. His vessel, the Eben Dodge, was one thousand two hundred and twenty-two tons, and belonged to New-Bedford, United States, whence she sailed on the twenty-sixth of November last, on a whaling voyage to the South-Pacific. S
Raphael Semmes (search for this): chapter 25
the Eben Dodge. They were the prisoners of Capt. Semmes, who, when the Sumter visited Cadiz recentlged alongside, coming up under her stern. Captain Semmes ordered Capt. Hoxie to take his boat and c conducted him to the cabin, where he found Capt. Semmes. Having examined the papers, the Sumter's was advised to look smart about it, as he (Capt. Semmes) must fire the ship. The conditions were cazing from stem to stern. Soon after this, Capt. Semmes called Capt. Hoxie aft, and said, Have you d to hand to the purser of the Sumter, who, Capt. Semmes said, would take care of it. Next morning, he steamer; and after examining the papers, Capt. Semmes declared the Vigilant lawful prize to the Cwork. In a conversation with Capt. Minott, Capt. Semmes said it was all fair; adding, You would havthe seventh. Before putting them on shore, Capt. Semmes assembled them and several of their officerof the Sumter might be given up to him; but Capt. Semmes said: Oh! That is contraband of war, and i[1 more...]
r, we shall take each in turn, and first of Capt. Hoxie. His vessel, the Eben Dodge, was one thousup under her stern. Captain Semmes ordered Capt. Hoxie to take his boat and come on board, bringin vessel Sumter, a statement, however, which Capt. Hoxie had anticipated. Capt. Hoxie, on going on Capt. Hoxie, on going on board, was received by the first lieutenant, who conducted him to the cabin, where he found Capt. Shave some of that; and he forthwith ordered Capt. Hoxie to go back, sending an armed boat's crew wind being again brought on board the Sumter, Capt. Hoxie was ordered by her commander to bring one bt what you say, I shall have you searched. Capt. Hoxie replied, that he had one hundred and fifty what they stood in, to be taken from them. Capt. Hoxie describes the condition of the Sumter as fie American Consul would take care of them. Capt. Hoxie then requested that the one hundred and fifted. They were then landed, and several of Capt. Hoxie's crew had to be supplied with clothes by t[2 more...]
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