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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
e, Tenn., February 26, 1862. The General Commanding congratulates his troops that it has been their privilege to restore the national banner to the capital of Tennessee. He believes that thousands of hearts in every part of the State will swell with joy to see that honored flag reinstated in a position from which it was removedir was warm and delicious; birds chirped and twittered among the boughs, which already are half concealed by the bursting buds and green young leaves of spring. Tennessee may, judging from the glimpses caught from the river, be well termed the Garden State, for never were there scenes better calculated to give pleasure to the loveday morning I rode out into the country seven or eight miles, and leaving the turnpike, dined with a friend in one of the quiet and luxurious farmer-homes of Middle Tennessee. Returning leisurely, I struck the pike about four P. M., and as everybody I had met in the morning had asked me the latest news from the city, I asked the
Decatur (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
reaching the tollgate, on the top of the hill overlooking Nashville, I strained my eyes to see the white flag on the capitol. The tall flag-staff was naked. There was no flag of any sort on it. Passing down Broad street by the Nashville and Decatur road, the first man I saw was Gov. Harris, about to leave on a special train, with the Legislature and archives of the State. The town was in commotion. Over the wire bridge that spans the Cumberland, Gen. Johnston's army were passing, taking d to stand with him. Such of them as were not willing to be surrendered to the uncovenanted mercies of Lincolndom, with the prospect of having the oath tendered them or the bastile, followed the retiring army. After taking my family as far as Decatur, I returned to Nashville on Wednesday. The stores were closed and bolted; the streets deserted, save by a guard here and there, and a press-gang taking up every man they could find, and sending him to load government pork into barges, upon whic
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
Doc. 63.-occupation of Nashville, Tenn. Official report of Lieut. Bryant. Nashville, Febrll to his soldiers when that officer entered Nashville: General orders, no. 13. headquarterr the balcony of an aristocratic house below Nashville, and shook a delicate white mouchoir and herr with the main outlines of the occupancy of Nashville, but at the risk of repetition I will give arse the virtuous and Christianly traitors of Nashville were highly delighted Sunday morning, to recn, were long miles away from the vicinity of Nashville. No prisoners, save one, were captured, andand to their prestige we owe much in gaining Nashville so easily. Said a citizen an hour since: I dn't have come up, and you wouldn't have got Nashville without a big fight! Doubtless this is pretount of the capture. A gentleman who left Nashville shortly after the battle at Fort Donelson cotollgate, on the top of the hill overlooking Nashville, I strained my eyes to see the white flag on[30 more...]
Paris, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
rth; others, unable to leave, have put triple bars before their doors and windows, and hide at once their fears and beauty behind these protections. In view of these facts, those who now wander through the streets are not formidable as to number, and they will, doubtless, soon become, to some extent, civilized. The rebels had stores here in unlimited quantities, none of which they were able to take away. All, after several days of riot, which, in terror almost exceeded the three days in Paris, in 1848, were divided among, or rather seized by, the mob. There were, in addition to the food, several hundred barrels of whisky, the heads of which were knocked in, and the contents allowed to mingle with the waters of the Cumberland. About one hundred of our prisoners, who were captured by the rebels at Donelson, were found at this place upon the arrival of our troops — all of them were either sick or wounded. That they were glad to once more find themselves among friends, will not b
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
as the trim of his own whiskers, or the features of his helpmate. One day she might be seen moored near some house far up the Cumberland, while her suave commander, Capt. Phelps, explained to some wondering native the object and scope of the present rebellion; the next day she would probably pitch a shell into the works at Fort Henry, or carefully cruise along the shore, in search of, or exchanging broadsides with, some masked battery; twenty--four hours after she would be cruising around Columbus, or possibly convoying transports, laden with troops, on some of the thousand and one expeditions that characterized for so long a period the operations at Cairo, during the summer and fall of 1861. The swiftest boat on the river, she has always been used for an express as well as gunboat, and thus, in one capacity or the other, has had scarcely an hour's leisure since she was first set afloat. There is not a house between Cairo and Fort Henry, on the Tennessee, and Fort Donelson, on th
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
nces of Federal success. If they succeed, we shall see plunder, insult to old and young, male and female, murder of innocents, release of slaves, and causing them to drive and insult their masters and mistresses in the most most menial services, the land laid waste, houses burned, banks and private coffers robbed, cotton and every valuable taken away before our eyes, and a brutal, drunken soldiery turned loose upon us. Who wants to see this? If you do not believe, you will see it; look at Missouri. As soon as our troops have occupied the country for a few weeks, and by their action given the lie to such assertions as the above, the latent Union sentiment, in this portion of the State, will develop itself to an extent that will overwhelm the traitors beyond redemption. Another week will witness a change of the greatest magnitude. The river-banks, and the country adjoining, from Donelson up to Nashville, are of a most charming character. The bluffs, on either side, are broken,
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
including the gallant struggles at Forts Henry and Donelson, has been engaged in active operations ever since ween Cairo and Fort Henry, on the Tennessee, and Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland, but what claims a friendly ir or more gallant officer never trod a plank. Fort Donelson, as we passed it, seemed more formidable than evmorning, the sixteenth inst., the day upon which Fort Donelson surrendered, the impression was prevalent in Nasy gunboats. We can whip you even-handed, said a Fort Donelson prisoner to me, on land, but d — n your gunboatsa portion of which we append: The fight at Fort Donelson, on the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth of inspire had been well-nigh dispelled by the way Fort Donelson was holding out. It was better located, and stro None since? The latest out, and plenty of it. Fort Donelson has fallen, and Nashville is surrendered! They d by a courier, with the news that our forces at Fort Donelson were surrounded, and must surrender. They are n
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
, the gunboat Conestoga was ordered to proceed from Cairo to this place, for the purpose of conveying orders to such of the gunboat fleet, as might be up the Cumberland River. The substance of the order was, I suppose, that all the boats which could be spared, should, together with the mortar-boats, report immediately at Cairo, wbe reached by gunboats. We can whip you even-handed, said a Fort Donelson prisoner to me, on land, but d — n your gunboats! The water is very high in the Cumberland River; higher, in fact, than it has been in many years. This has favored the gunboats, and to their prestige we owe much in gaining Nashville so easily. Said a cight. The sight of a withdrawing or retreating army is very disheartening. My residence is in Edgefield, a little village separated from Nashville by the Cumberland River. For several days Gen. Johnston's headquarters had been established on that side of the river, and near me. The lady with whom he and his staff took their m
Russellville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
red. Three out of seven in this river are believed to be disabled. Firing kept up all day on our lines without loss on our side. We hear firing again this morning. They have had large reinforcements. Their whole force supposed to be near one hundred thousand. Our officers feel confident of success, and our troops equally so, and cannot be conquered. A Virginia regiment, McCaustin, took one of their batteries night before last without any loss on our side. Reports of the capture of Russellville and Elkton not believed. Their whole loss, it is thought, exceeds one thousand. Cave Johnson. Of course the virtuous and Christianly traitors of Nashville were highly delighted Sunday morning, to receive these encouraging assurances of the thrifty progress of rebellion. They were mingling this glad intelligence with their devotions — indulging in cheerful anticipations of the future of Dixie, while they gave vent to Old Hundred and other Te Deums, when suddenly the delicious union
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
ds of which were knocked in, and the contents allowed to mingle with the waters of the Cumberland. About one hundred of our prisoners, who were captured by the rebels at Donelson, were found at this place upon the arrival of our troops — all of them were either sick or wounded. That they were glad to once more find themselves among friends, will not be doubted. It is not known precisely to what point the enemy is retiring, but it is generally believed that they are concentrating at Chattanooga, in this State. I doubt very much their making any more stands of any magnitude at any point where they can be reached by gunboats. We can whip you even-handed, said a Fort Donelson prisoner to me, on land, but d — n your gunboats! The water is very high in the Cumberland River; higher, in fact, than it has been in many years. This has favored the gunboats, and to their prestige we owe much in gaining Nashville so easily. Said a citizen an hour since: I think the Old Monster has se
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