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Henry, Marshall County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
requisition to show their recognition and joyfulness. Until this last trip, the Conestoga has been lucky beyond all precedent. During all her fights she has never lost a man, and was never struck but once, and then by a charge of grape, which did no further damage than to literally perforate her smoke — stack, and slightly wound a setter belonging to some of the crew. At Lucas Bend, last September, she silenced a battery of twelve pieces that suddenly opened upon her from the shore; at Henry and Donelson the iron shower fell all around her; time and again has she been opened upon by batteries which the rebels had stationed on the river-bank for her special benefit; scores of times have rebel riflemen poured a heavy fire upon her as she steamed by some well-timbered bluff; but in no case has she met with a single loss, or had a splinter raised by hostile bullets, save with the single exception above referred to. Even that was not serious, as the dog was long since convalescent, a
Elkton (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
t of seven in this river are believed to be disabled. Firing kept up all day on our lines without loss on our side. We hear firing again this morning. They have had large reinforcements. Their whole force supposed to be near one hundred thousand. Our officers feel confident of success, and our troops equally so, and cannot be conquered. A Virginia regiment, McCaustin, took one of their batteries night before last without any loss on our side. Reports of the capture of Russellville and Elkton not believed. Their whole loss, it is thought, exceeds one thousand. Cave Johnson. Of course the virtuous and Christianly traitors of Nashville were highly delighted Sunday morning, to receive these encouraging assurances of the thrifty progress of rebellion. They were mingling this glad intelligence with their devotions — indulging in cheerful anticipations of the future of Dixie, while they gave vent to Old Hundred and other Te Deums, when suddenly the delicious union of religion a
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
the three wooden boats, and apart from her active participation in several fights, including the gallant struggles at Forts Henry and Donelson, has been engaged in active operations ever since last June. There is not a resident on the banks of anyg native the object and scope of the present rebellion; the next day she would probably pitch a shell into the works at Fort Henry, or carefully cruise along the shore, in search of, or exchanging broadsides with, some masked battery; twenty--four hor the other, has had scarcely an hour's leisure since she was first set afloat. There is not a house between Cairo and Fort Henry, on the Tennessee, and Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland, but what claims a friendly interest in the Conestoga. She nevay's work down there wound up with the statement that the fight would be renewed to-morrow. The fears that the fall of Fort Henry were calculated to inspire had been well-nigh dispelled by the way Fort Donelson was holding out. It was better located
Dover, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
es were floating gaily from the loftiest bastion of the works; companies in blue were manoeuvring about the grounds; brass bands enlivened the air with everything but Dixie; clean white tents, and fine-looking soldiers covered the surroundings of Dover, and, in short, everything appeared as though determination, enterprise and go-aheadativeness had got possession of the place. All the way up to Clarksville we found evidences of loyalty among the scattered residences along the banks of the riay is ours!! Pillow, however, failed in his prognostication. His honor, apparently, is not worth speaking of. The only despatch that he can pride himself on is the despatch with which he, in company with the valiant Floyd, got himself out of Dover, danger, and the range of Yankee bullets. The despatch of the other sanguine individual is also liable to objection, both on account of its lack of truthfulness and its inelegant allusions. Instead of pickling the Nationals, the rebels became
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 65
. Official, J. M. Wright, A. A. G. New-York times account. Nashville, Tenn., Thursday, February 27, 1862. Tuesday, the gunboat Conestoga was ordered to proceed from Cairo to this place, for the purpose of conveying orders to such of the gunboat fleet, as might be up the Cumberland River. The substance of the order was, I suppose, that all the boats which could be spared, should, together with the mortar-boats, report immediately at Cairo, with a view to operations down the Mississippi River. The Conestoga, by the way, is one of the three wooden boats, and apart from her active participation in several fights, including the gallant struggles at Forts Henry and Donelson, has been engaged in active operations ever since last June. There is not a resident on the banks of any of the rivers within two hundred miles of Cairo, to whom the appearance of the Conestoga is not as familiar as the trim of his own whiskers, or the features of his helpmate. One day she might be seen
Brentwood, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
last — if not when we leave it, then when we drive the enemy out of it. For Tennesseeans are resolved that the enemy shall not rest on their soil. Gen. Floyd and staff left Thursday morning, and it was understood that Capt. John H. Morgan, with his company, would retire slowly, as the enemy in force entered. The Louisiana cavalry, Col. Scott, were near Franklin, on their way to the vicinity of Nashville, where they will act as scouts and hold the enemy closely in bounds. As far out as Brentwood, Franklin and Columbia, some people are leaving their homes and sending off their slaves. Others, deeply-committed Southerners, stand and risk the consequences. They look for inconveniences and heavy losses, staying or going. In reply to the question often asked, whether any Union element has been developed by these events: There was always some of this element in Nashville, but in very inconsiderable proportion to the population. Let Unionists show their hands and heads now; it is h
J. M. Wright (search for this): chapter 65
y cannot bring shame on their comrades and the cause they are engaged in. The Government supplies with liberality all the wants of the soldier. The occasional deprivations in hardships, incident to rapid marching, must be borne with patience and fortitude. Any officer who neglects to provide properly for his troops, and separates himself from them to seek his own comfort, will be held to a rigid accountability. By command of Gen. Buell. James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff. Official, J. M. Wright, A. A. G. New-York times account. Nashville, Tenn., Thursday, February 27, 1862. Tuesday, the gunboat Conestoga was ordered to proceed from Cairo to this place, for the purpose of conveying orders to such of the gunboat fleet, as might be up the Cumberland River. The substance of the order was, I suppose, that all the boats which could be spared, should, together with the mortar-boats, report immediately at Cairo, with a view to operations down the Mississippi River. The C
Frank Anderson (search for this): chapter 65
ion of by the mob. There were a large number of guns in the city, but they were either spiked, thrown in the river, or placed on the bridges be fore they were fired. The two gunboats, alluded to in the Banner extra, were also partially burned, and sunk close by the railroad bridge, but fortunately not in a position to interfere with navigation. Several fine steamers were captured, the rebels leaving in such a hurry that they had not time to burn them. Among them were the Pink Varrble, Gen. Anderson, G. W. Hillman, J. H. Baldwin, Charter, B. M. Runnion, W. V. Baird, and two others. About half of them are side-wheelers and first-class boats. The Baldwin was captured yesterday. She had been somewhere up the river, and not knowing the important changes which had occurred in Nashville during her absence, came unsuspiciously into the national net, and was taken. I have spent a good deal of time to-day in conversing with the citizens, and found but little Union sentiment. Men asser
Alexander Magee (search for this): chapter 65
any dog in Christendom. If the Conestoga be not peculiarly entitled to the term lucky, there is no luck extant. The following are the names of the officers: Captain, S. L. Phelps; First Master, John F. Duke; Second Master, Chas. P. Noble; Third Master, Benjamin Sebastian; Fourth Master, H. Cutter; Master's Mate, James Kearney; Surgeon, W. H. Wilson; Purser, Alfred Phelps; Pilots, A. M. Jordan, Wm. M. Attenborough; Gunner, Henry Hamilton; First Engineer, Thos. Cook; Second Engineer, Alexander Magee; Third Engineer, Michael Norton; Fourth Engineer, James O'Neil. I may add, that the officers, without exception, are gentlemen in the complete sense of the word, and possess, in addition to this qualification, a thorough knowledge of their duties. The efficacy of Capt. Phelps is so well known, that special reference to it would be superfluous. Suffice it that an abler or more gallant officer never trod a plank. Fort Donelson, as we passed it, seemed more formidable than ever; its
D. C. Buell (search for this): chapter 65
rvant, A. C. Bryant, Lieutenant Commanding. General Buell's order. The following is the order of Gen. BGen. Buell to his soldiers when that officer entered Nashville: General orders, no. 13. headquarters Departm be held to a rigid accountability. By command of Gen. Buell. James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff. Offician the land. Sunday morning a small advance of Gen. Buell's column arrived and took possession of Edgefieldlle. Nothing was done until Monday evening, when Gen. Buell arrived at Edgefield, and was immediately visiteded hour the Mayor and some ten citizens waited on Gen. Buell and surrendered the city, receiving assurances th people, have discharged their duty by calling on Gen. Buell, at his headquarters in Edgefield, on yesterday. quors. I shall not hesitate to invoke the aid of Gen. Buell in case the recent laws upon this subject are vio, for the good of the city, shall retire. I know Gen. Buell well. He is a gentleman, and will not suffer any
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