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Fort Taylor (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
exception of those who were on picket duty, naval vessels being chosen as guards. The next morning, (Sunday, the fourteenth inst.,) a very heavy fog lay upon the surface of the water, rendering objects but a short distance from you invisible. It lasted but a short time, however, lifting sufficiently to enable the gunboats to proceed on their way to Newbern. The great trouble now was to pass the obstruction in the channel, which I have already described, and at the same time to engage Fort Brown and the rebel fortification, much stronger than the two preceding ones. It contained two powerful columbiads, brought so as to bear upon any vessel that might be impaled upon the beams placed there for the purpose, or that might be otherwise stopped, and it was also bomb-proof, rendering it very difficult to subdue. The blockade had to be forced, and every moment was precious. This was a moment of suspense, but it lasted only for a short time, as Commander Rowan signalled for the rest o
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
ain is pouring in torrents on dead and dying on the field of battle, but it cannot be helped. Mr. Vincent Colyer, of the Young Men's Christian Association, who has followed the army here, was active in distributing the hospital supplies so generously contributed by the charitable. New supplies are now needed, and, especially in view of the imminence of another battle, should be forwarded at once to Mr. Colyer, in care of Dr. Church, Division Surgeon, Newbern, N. C. Any vessels coming from New-York or Fortress Monroe, will bring them here free of charge, by Gen. Burnside's special order. Mr. Colyer has gone to considerable pains to collect the names of the killed and wounded, and has laid me under obligations for the list hereto annexed. As I have given you the general order issued from headquarters before the battle, it will be interesting to subjoin No. 17, just published: headquarters Department North-Carolina, Newbern, March 15, 1862. General orders, No. 17. The G
Fort Macon (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
adquarters that there were two more regiments at the Newbern camp. The value of the public property captured here is enormous, consisting of fifty-three heavy cannon and field-pieces, ammunition, quartermaster's and commissary stores, camps and camp equipage, horses, transportation, and naval stores in large quantities, cotton, etc. Probably two million dollars would not purchase the articles at first hand. But the victory is the more important from the fact that it places Beaufort and Fort Macon at our mercy, and opens up to us by railroad the direct lines of communication between the rebel army and the country which supports it. Perhaps the public North can give a shrewd guess as to our next place of destination. We can here, but we will not divulge it until the next mail, which will leave here in a few days. By that opportunity I hope to send a correct map of the field of battle, with the positions occupied by the several regiments of this victorious army. The operations o
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
nt. The column was immediately halted, and a reconnoissance being made by Capt. Williamson, Topographical Engineer on Gen. Burnside's staff, it was found deserted. The work must have required the labor of a thousand men for a month, being constructed in the most thorough and scientific manner. A deep and wide moat extended along the front, and an abattis of felled timber had been made on both flanks. No guns had been mounted, the enemy probably thinking the division was to move first on Norfolk, and that no great haste was required in preparing the nice little thing for our reception. A mile further on, a road crossing our line of march ran down to the river. Thinking that the enemy might have a fortification on the beach, with a large supporting body of infantry, a reconnoissance was ordered by Gen. Foster, and Lieutenants Strong, Pendleton, Captain Hudson, and other of his aids riding down, found a large battery, which had been deserted in haste. They waved a white handkerc
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
s stated at headquarters that there were two more regiments at the Newbern camp. The value of the public property captured here is enormous, consisting of fifty-three heavy cannon and field-pieces, ammunition, quartermaster's and commissary stores, camps and camp equipage, horses, transportation, and naval stores in large quantities, cotton, etc. Probably two million dollars would not purchase the articles at first hand. But the victory is the more important from the fact that it places Beaufort and Fort Macon at our mercy, and opens up to us by railroad the direct lines of communication between the rebel army and the country which supports it. Perhaps the public North can give a shrewd guess as to our next place of destination. We can here, but we will not divulge it until the next mail, which will leave here in a few days. By that opportunity I hope to send a correct map of the field of battle, with the positions occupied by the several regiments of this victorious army. Th
Petersburgh (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
ich were piled two hundred barrels spirits of turpentine and one hundred and fifty bales of cotton. The torch was applied, and the raft set adrift, and in a few moments it lay alongside the piers of the bridge, and the costly fabric was wrapped in flames from end to end. The turnpike-bridge across the river was also burnt by our forces. The Gaston House, the Washington Hotel, many churches, and the greater portion of the town, is in ashes. A lad, who left Friday night, and reached Petersburgh yesterday morning, says the Yankees were busily engaged in endeavoring to check the progress of the flames, and it was thought that some few houses would be saved, at least enough to shelter the demons who have invaded the place. All the cotton, about two hundred bales, and one thousand five hundred barrels of rosin and turpentine, besides naval stores, were destroyed. The theatre, it is said, escaped destruction. Here the Yankees secured about twenty-five kegs of gunpowder, which
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
ship, with great gallantry and precision. Along the river, by the mouth of the creek, he ground is marshy, and while not so much so as the landing-place at Roanoke Island, was still miry enough to make the labor of dragging the field-pieces very heavy. Our path led for little distance through a fringe of woods, in which the Spe person of Adjutant Frazar A. Stearns, the young man who bore himself so bravely in the difficult and dangerous charge on the right of the enemy's battery on Roanoke Island. Poor Stearns received a bullet in his right breast, and fell dead in his place. He was the son of the President of Amherst College, and possessed the love he field and in hospital, the number of wounded being so large, and their own force reduced by absences on leave, and those left in charge of the hospitals at Roanoke Island. The brigade hospitals were in charge respectively of Dr. Thompson, Dr. Cutter, of the Twenty-first Massachusetts, and Dr. Rivers, of the Fourth Rhode Island
Bremen, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
t foundation. The whole number of prisoners will not reach two hundred. It is said that the enemy was piloted through a swamp on our left by a mulatto; at any rate, they were piloted by somebody who knew the country, and there is not wanting suspicion attaching itself to some white person or persons. The artillery companies behaved well. Of course our heavy guns had to be abandoned, and some of our field-guns also. Latham's battery is said to have worked great havoc among the enemy. Bremen's battery lost some of its pieces, as did Latham's. We believe the horses were killed. The all-sufficient explanation of our defeat was, want of men. With the militia, they outnumbered us nearly five to one; leaving out the militia, they outnumbered us nearly six to one. After Sinclair's regiment left, those who bore the brunt of the battle were outnumbered fully seven to one. That, under these circumstances, we could hold our position permanently, was not in the range of possibility.
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
the charitable. New supplies are now needed, and, especially in view of the imminence of another battle, should be forwarded at once to Mr. Colyer, in care of Dr. Church, Division Surgeon, Newbern, N. C. Any vessels coming from New-York or Fortress Monroe, will bring them here free of charge, by Gen. Burnside's special order. Mr. Colyer has gone to considerable pains to collect the names of the killed and wounded, and has laid me under obligations for the list hereto annexed. As I have giette, and a few others whose names it is impossible for me to call to mind at the present moment. The reason of Commodore Rowan being in command was, that as soon as the news reached the fleet of the attack by the Merrimac on our vessels at Fortress Monroe, Commodore Goldsborough was so uneasy, that he immediately returned to Old Point, leaving the direction of the naval movements in the hands of the next officer in rank. Commodore Rowan consequently took charge, and he is deserving of the hi
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
Doc. 95.-battle of Newbern, N. C., fought March 14, 1862. General Burnside's report. headquarters Department of North-Carolina, Newbern, March 16, 1862. General L. Thomas, Adjutant-General United States Army: General: I have the honor to report that, after embarking the troops with which I intended to attack Newbern, in conjunction with the naval force, on the morning of the eleventh, a rendezvous was made at Hatteras Inlet. Flag-Officer Goldsborough having been ordered to Hamptone to the vessels. All the officers and men acquitted themselves nobly, and it is only to be regretted that they had not a foe better worthy of their steel to contend against. --N. Y. Herald, March 19. Rebel Narratives. From various North-Carolina papers we take the following particulars of the battle: The enemy's gunboats first appeared in sight on Wednesday afternoon, at a point known as Slocum's Creek, and commenced shelling the woods in every direction. A company of cavalry, Ca
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