hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Washington (United States) 99 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 90 0 Browse Search
Felix K. Zollicoffer 59 1 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 58 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 52 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 52 0 Browse Search
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) 48 0 Browse Search
S. S. Fry 48 2 Browse Search
Abe Lincoln 46 0 Browse Search
Floyd 45 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 28 total hits in 10 results.

Harford (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 161
tyle of the French lady, while McClure escaped in some other way. Meanwhile our citizens became intensely excited, and took measures to mete out vengeance on the heads of the chivalry. They were allowed fifteen minutes to leave town, which time was lengthened until eight o'clock, on account of no conveyance. Finally they were allowed to take their departure under escort in an open row-boat, in the midst of a drenching rain, and in darkness as black as that of Egypt. They bore away for Harford county, since which we have not heard from them. Nothing saved them from the vengeance of the people but respect for Capt. John W. Taylor, at whose house they were stopping. Capt. Taylor was not at home when the outrage was committed, but when he arrived he promptly ordered the heroes off. Upon this, McClure threatened to blow Capt. Taylor's brains out in his own house, seizing a double-barreled gun belonging to Capt. Taylor. Both barrels were loaded, but fortunately there were no caps on. C
Port Deposit (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 161
The Desecration of the Stars and Stripes. Port Deposit, Md., Feb. 20, 1862. Messrs. Editors: Lest the necessary brevity of your special despatch per telegraph last evening should not give a proper understanding of the outrage perpetrated here on the flag of our country by the two secessionists, McClure and Henderson, from Baltimore, I beg to submit the following statement: These two gentlemen, Douglas McClure and Edward Henderson, Esqs., after abusing the hospitalities of our town, took the liberty, yesterday evening, about five o'clock, to cut down the American flag which was suspended across the street on lines attached to the residences of Capt. John W. Taylor and Mrs. E. T. Rinehart. When the halyards were cut, the flag fell in the mud, where it was noticed by a few of our citizens, who raised it from its place of disgrace, and flung it again to its native breeze. As soon as it was known among the people how the flag got there, search was made for the two bloods, wh
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 161
The Desecration of the Stars and Stripes. Port Deposit, Md., Feb. 20, 1862. Messrs. Editors: Lest the necessary brevity of your special despatch per telegraph last evening should not give a proper understanding of the outrage perpetrated here on the flag of our country by the two secessionists, McClure and Henderson, from Baltimore, I beg to submit the following statement: These two gentlemen, Douglas McClure and Edward Henderson, Esqs., after abusing the hospitalities of our town, took the liberty, yesterday evening, about five o'clock, to cut down the American flag which was suspended across the street on lines attached to the residences of Capt. John W. Taylor and Mrs. E. T. Rinehart. When the halyards were cut, the flag fell in the mud, where it was noticed by a few of our citizens, who raised it from its place of disgrace, and flung it again to its native breeze. As soon as it was known among the people how the flag got there, search was made for the two bloods, wh
Douglas McClure (search for this): chapter 161
uld not give a proper understanding of the outrage perpetrated here on the flag of our country by the two secessionists, McClure and Henderson, from Baltimore, I beg to submit the following statement: These two gentlemen, Douglas McClure and EdwaDouglas McClure and Edward Henderson, Esqs., after abusing the hospitalities of our town, took the liberty, yesterday evening, about five o'clock, to cut down the American flag which was suspended across the street on lines attached to the residences of Capt. John W. Taylod into the house of Capt. Taylor. Henderson was found under a clothes-basket, after the style of the French lady, while McClure escaped in some other way. Meanwhile our citizens became intensely excited, and took measures to mete out vengeance on taylor was not at home when the outrage was committed, but when he arrived he promptly ordered the heroes off. Upon this, McClure threatened to blow Capt. Taylor's brains out in his own house, seizing a double-barreled gun belonging to Capt. Taylor.
John W. Taylor (search for this): chapter 161
s the street on lines attached to the residences of Capt. John W. Taylor and Mrs. E. T. Rinehart. When the halyards were cue for the two bloods, who had escaped into the house of Capt. Taylor. Henderson was found under a clothes-basket, after theem from the vengeance of the people but respect for Capt. John W. Taylor, at whose house they were stopping. Capt. Taylor wCapt. Taylor was not at home when the outrage was committed, but when he arrived he promptly ordered the heroes off. Upon this, McClure threatened to blow Capt. Taylor's brains out in his own house, seizing a double-barreled gun belonging to Capt. Taylor. Both Capt. Taylor. Both barrels were loaded, but fortunately there were no caps on. Capt. Taylor hastened to arm himself, but fortunately the peopleCapt. Taylor hastened to arm himself, but fortunately the people came to the rescue, when our guests were marched off. It is providential that there was not a tragedy on the spot. Capt. TCapt. Taylor has the deepest sympathies of the people, and they regret that he and his family were exposed to the mortifying circum
The Desecration of the Stars and Stripes. Port Deposit, Md., Feb. 20, 1862. Messrs. Editors: Lest the necessary brevity of your special despatch per telegraph last evening should not give a proper understanding of the outrage perpetrated here on the flag of our country by the two secessionists, McClure and Henderson, from Baltimore, I beg to submit the following statement: These two gentlemen, Douglas McClure and Edward Henderson, Esqs., after abusing the hospitalities of our town, took the liberty, yesterday evening, about five o'clock, to cut down the American flag which was suspended across the street on lines attached to the residences of Capt. John W. Taylor and Mrs. E. T. Rinehart. When the halyards were cut, the flag fell in the mud, where it was noticed by a few of our citizens, who raised it from its place of disgrace, and flung it again to its native breeze. As soon as it was known among the people how the flag got there, search was made for the two bloods, wh
E. T. Rinehart (search for this): chapter 161
proper understanding of the outrage perpetrated here on the flag of our country by the two secessionists, McClure and Henderson, from Baltimore, I beg to submit the following statement: These two gentlemen, Douglas McClure and Edward Henderson, Esqs., after abusing the hospitalities of our town, took the liberty, yesterday evening, about five o'clock, to cut down the American flag which was suspended across the street on lines attached to the residences of Capt. John W. Taylor and Mrs. E. T. Rinehart. When the halyards were cut, the flag fell in the mud, where it was noticed by a few of our citizens, who raised it from its place of disgrace, and flung it again to its native breeze. As soon as it was known among the people how the flag got there, search was made for the two bloods, who had escaped into the house of Capt. Taylor. Henderson was found under a clothes-basket, after the style of the French lady, while McClure escaped in some other way. Meanwhile our citizens became i
Edward Henderson (search for this): chapter 161
er telegraph last evening should not give a proper understanding of the outrage perpetrated here on the flag of our country by the two secessionists, McClure and Henderson, from Baltimore, I beg to submit the following statement: These two gentlemen, Douglas McClure and Edward Henderson, Esqs., after abusing the hospitalities ofEdward Henderson, Esqs., after abusing the hospitalities of our town, took the liberty, yesterday evening, about five o'clock, to cut down the American flag which was suspended across the street on lines attached to the residences of Capt. John W. Taylor and Mrs. E. T. Rinehart. When the halyards were cut, the flag fell in the mud, where it was noticed by a few of our citizens, who raiseve breeze. As soon as it was known among the people how the flag got there, search was made for the two bloods, who had escaped into the house of Capt. Taylor. Henderson was found under a clothes-basket, after the style of the French lady, while McClure escaped in some other way. Meanwhile our citizens became intensely excited, a
February 20th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 161
The Desecration of the Stars and Stripes. Port Deposit, Md., Feb. 20, 1862. Messrs. Editors: Lest the necessary brevity of your special despatch per telegraph last evening should not give a proper understanding of the outrage perpetrated here on the flag of our country by the two secessionists, McClure and Henderson, from Baltimore, I beg to submit the following statement: These two gentlemen, Douglas McClure and Edward Henderson, Esqs., after abusing the hospitalities of our town, took the liberty, yesterday evening, about five o'clock, to cut down the American flag which was suspended across the street on lines attached to the residences of Capt. John W. Taylor and Mrs. E. T. Rinehart. When the halyards were cut, the flag fell in the mud, where it was noticed by a few of our citizens, who raised it from its place of disgrace, and flung it again to its native breeze. As soon as it was known among the people how the flag got there, search was made for the two bloods, wh
February 24th (search for this): chapter 161
g rain, and in darkness as black as that of Egypt. They bore away for Harford county, since which we have not heard from them. Nothing saved them from the vengeance of the people but respect for Capt. John W. Taylor, at whose house they were stopping. Capt. Taylor was not at home when the outrage was committed, but when he arrived he promptly ordered the heroes off. Upon this, McClure threatened to blow Capt. Taylor's brains out in his own house, seizing a double-barreled gun belonging to Capt. Taylor. Both barrels were loaded, but fortunately there were no caps on. Capt. Taylor hastened to arm himself, but fortunately the people came to the rescue, when our guests were marched off. It is providential that there was not a tragedy on the spot. Capt. Taylor has the deepest sympathies of the people, and they regret that he and his family were exposed to the mortifying circumstances of this dis agreeable affair. Yours, truly, Stars and Stripes. --Baltimore American, February 24.