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Craney Island (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
n fire by the rebels, who, at the same time, partially blew up the dry-dock. I also visited Craney Island, where I found thirty-nine guns of large calibre, most of which were spiked; also a large nuumber of shot and shell, as well as many other articles of value stationed at the Navy-Yard, Craney Island, Sewell's Point, and other places. John E. Wool, Major-General Commanding New-York timegime, considered this a favorable opportunity for effecting their object. They slipped past Craney Island without attracting any hostile observation, and then steered directly for Newport News. On with enthusiastic cheering by the troops who were embarking. The Merrimac still lies off Craney Island, and the Monitor has resumed her usual position. The fleet are floating quietly at their ann the sea side. The iron monster, the Merrimac, still remains moored under the shore of the Craney Island battery, and has not apparently budged a peg for the last twenty-four hours. The Monitor has
Gosport (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ered the city, agreeably to the terms set forth in the resolutions of the Common Council presented by the Mayor, Wm. W. Lamb, which were accepted by me so far as related to the civil rights of its citizens. A copy of the resolutions has been already furnished you. I immediately took possession of the city, and appointed Brig.-Gen. Egbert L. Viele Military Governor of Norfolk, with directions to see that the citizens were protected in all their civil rights. Soon after I took possession of Gosport and Portsmouth. The taking of Norfolk caused the destruction of the iron-clad steamer Merrimac, which was blown up by the rebels about five o'clock on the morning of the eleventh of May, which was soon after communicated to you and the President of the United States. On the eleventh I visited the navy-yard, and found all the workshops, storehouses, and other buildings in ruins, having been set on fire by the rebels, who, at the same time, partially blew up the dry-dock. I also visited Cr
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ections to see that the citizens were protected in all their civil rights. Soon after I took possession of Gosport and Portsmouth. The taking of Norfolk caused the destruction of the iron-clad steamer Merrimac, which was blown up by the rebels aboufreely posted and circulated throughout the town: Norfolk, May 11, 1862. The occupancy of the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth is for the protection of the public laws and the maintenance of the public laws of the United States. Private associatted the city and restored the civil authorities; that there were no troops at that time within some miles of Norfolk or Portsmouth; and that, under all circumstances, he was prepared, on the part of the people, to give to the Federal troops quiet andnd pump belonging to it were removed to Richmond. Whilst the Union men of Norfolk are reserved and fearful, those of Portsmouth, on.the contrary, gave the most enthusiastic testimony on Sunday in behalf of the faith that is in them. The destructi
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ng of the eleventh of May, which was soon after communicated to you and the President of the United States. On the eleventh I visited the navy-yard, and found all the workshops, storehouses, and othrt Monroe, Saturday evening, 8 o'clock. Norfolk and Gosport Navy-Yard again belong to the United States. Our troops, under General Wool, entered and took possession of the town at five o'clock inody of the troops. The Mayor said he had come to surrender the city into the hands of the United States, and to ask protection for the persons and property of the citizens. Gen. Wool replied that his request was granted in advance--that the Government of the United States had not the slightest wish or thought of interfering with the rights of any peaceable citizen, and that all should havemouth is for the protection of the public laws and the maintenance of the public laws of the United States. Private associations and domestic quiet will not be disturbed, but violations of order and
Moscow, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ch were unfinished, set on fire and floated over towards Norfolk, probably for the purpose of destroying the city. The firemen, however, towed them out and extinguished them. This work of destruction was accomplished on Saturday night, after the Federal troops had occupied Norfolk; and the incendiaries could be seen moving about in the darkness, with their pitch-pine flambeaux, like so many diabolical visitants. The scene strongly reminded the spectator of the panorama of the burning of Moscow, and with the immense flame that it threw forth made the scene one of terrible grandeur. Letter from General Wool. In a private letter to a friend in New-York, Gen. Wool wrote: The whole affair of the capture of Norfolk was done in twenty-seven hours. My course was by water twelve miles, and by land thirty-six, on horseback. My friend D----will tell you I am a hard rider. I do not think he will care to ride <*>ith me again to Hampton and back. I found by examination, on Fr
Willoughby Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ay Secretary Chase, who had been spending two or three days here, as had also President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton, learned from a pilot familiar with the coast, that there was a place where a landing could be effected a mile or so beyond Willoughby Point, and that a very good road led directly from that shore to Norfolk. In company with Gen. Wool and Col. T. J. Cram, of the Topographical Engineers, Secretary Chase on Friday crossed over in the steam revenue cutter Miami, and sent a boat to ansports steaming about is most beautiful, presenting a panoramic view that is seldom witnessed. Willoughby's point, Va., Saturday Morning, May 10. The troops left during the night, and at daylight could be seen from the wharf landing at Willoughby Point, a short distance from the Rip Raps. Through the influence of Secretary Stanton, I obtained this morning a permit to accompany Gen. Wool and Gen. Mansfield and their staffs to Willoughby's Point, on the steamer Kansas, and here I am on th
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ternoon) I organized a force to march against Norfolk. On Saturday morning, the tenth of May, the ght become necessary for him to take and hold Norfolk. On Thursday the little steam-tug J. B. White came in from Norfolk, having deserted from the rebel service. She had been sent to bring in a entrenched camp, some two miles this side of Norfolk, which had been very strongly fortified with owing: headquarters, Department of Virginia, Norfolk, May 10, 1862. The city of Norfolk having d with his troops some twenty miles, captured Norfolk, and was in bed again in his own quarters befre opposite the Rip Raps, and march direct on Norfolk. At the time I commence writing--nine o'cl in the morning picketed within five miles of Norfolk. The First Delaware, Colonel Andrews, push wrote: The whole affair of the capture of Norfolk was done in twenty-seven hours. My course wasy a countermarch proceeded by the old road to Norfolk, where I arrived safe at five o'clock, when t[49 more...]
Point Pleasant (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
to Willoughby's Point, on the steamer Kansas, and here I am on the sacred soil, within eight miles of Norfolk. The point at which we have landed is known as Point Pleasant, one of the favorite drives from Norfolk. The first regiment landed was the Twentieth New-York, known as Max Weber's regiment, who pushed on immediately, uk. Fires were burning all around the country, principally the destruction of barracks and camps. Fortress Monroe, May 10, 1862. I have just returned from Point Pleasant. Large reinforcements of cavalry, infantry, and artillery are being sent over, and we will soon have quite a respectable force in the rear of Norfolk to repuFort Norfolk. But I must proceed to give you a narrative as to how all these events originated. In my last letter I stated that a force had been landed at Point Pleasant, eight miles in the rear of Norfolk, under command of Major-Gen. Wool, with Brig.-Generals Mansfield, Max Weber, and Viele. The first division of the troops
West Fork Tanners Creek (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
She had been sent to bring in a couple of rebel schooners from the mouth of Tanner's Creek; the officers in charge of her being Northern men, and having been long desforward the infantry rapidly, was to secure, if possible, the bridge across Tanner's Creek, by which the route to Norfolk would be shortened several miles. The routeo miles and a half to a point where a diverging road led around the head of Tanner's Creek, and took that route to Norfolk. Nothing further was heard from the party hin three miles of Norfolk without meeting with any serious opposition. At Tanner's Creek a small picket was stationed, with a howitzer, and a slight skirmish took pce for five miles without any obstructions. On approaching the bridge over Tanner's Creek, the rebels retreated across, set it on fire, and with three small howitzerhat the city could be reached by the Princess Anne road, around the head of Tanner's Creek, by a march of eight miles. On obtaining this information, Gen. Wool ordere
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
could not be secured, and partly because such a movement was not consistent with the general plan of the campaign which had been decided upon. After the fall of Yorktown and the withdrawal of the great body of the rebel army, it was believed that the abandonment of Norfolk would speedily follow as a necessary consequence. When Gen. McClellan, therefore, on Monday after the fall of Yorktown, telegraphed to Gen. Wool asking for more troops, in order to make an effective pursuit of the rebels up York River, Gen. Wool declined to send any, on the ground that it might become necessary for him to take and hold Norfolk. On Thursday the little steam-tug J. B.acuation of the city and of the object of his visit. It seems that a meeting was held at Norfolk some days since — not long, probably, after the evacuation of Yorktown was resolved upon — by the rebel Secretary of War, Gen. Huger, Gen. Longstreet, and some others of the leading military authorities, at which it was determined n
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