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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
Rebel reports and narratives. Official report of Kirby Smith. headquarters army of Kentucky, Richmond, Ky., Aug. 30, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.: sir: It is my great pleasure to announce to you that God has thrice blessed our arms to-day. After a forced march, almost day and night, for three days, over a mountain wilderness, destitute alike of food and water, I found the enemy drawn up in force to oppose us, at a point eight miles from this place. With less than half my force I attacked and carried a very strong position at Mount Zion Church, after a very hard fight of two hours; again, a still better position at White's Farm, in half an hour; and, finally, in this town, just before sunset, our indomitable troops deliberately walked (they were too tired to run) up to a magnificent position manned by ten thousand of the enemy, many of them perfectly fresh, and carried it in fifteen minutes. It is impossible for me now to
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
victory has not been achieved during the war. The confederate veterans did terrible execution among the hordes of raw levies opposing them; and though but a small portion of Gen. Smith's force was engaged, it was mere child's play for them, and scarcely impeded their onward march. General Nelson, who was himself among the wounded, succeeded in reaching Lexington on Sunday, followed by several small squads of his men, who arrived by different roads. In the mean time, a number of Ohio and Indiana regiments had reached here to reinforce Gen. Nelson; and these, together with Williams's and Jacob's Kentucky cavalry, which had also arrived, formed an apparently formidable army, and on Monday, when General Smith's approach was announced, confident predictions of the successful defence of Lexington were indulged in by Federal officers and their sympathizers. Towards night, however, rumor, with her usual truthfulness, announced that immense bodies of confederates were approaching the city
Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
unt. After passing many weary months under the oppressions of the ruthless military despotism of Mr. Lincoln's administration, the people of this portion of Kentucky have at last been liberated by the conquering army of heroes under the command of Major-Gen. Kirby Smith. His advance has been announced for several weeks through the Federal papers, and his arrival was therefore not unexpected. Entering the State through Big Creek Gap, (Cumberland Mountain,) some twenty miles south of Cumberland Gap, he took position in the rear of the Federal army stationed at the latter place under Gen. Morgan, effectually cutting off his communications, and rendering his surrender only a question of time. After several small and successful affairs on his march from the Gap, Gen. Smith arrived at Richmond (twenty-five miles from Lexington) on Saturday last, and at that place attacked and almost destroyed the Union army which had been massed there under General Nelson to dispute his march. Beside
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
edient servant, E. Kirby Smith, Major-General Commanding. Kentucky Statesman account. After passing many weary months under the oppressions of the ruthless military despotism of Mr. Lincoln's administration, the people of this portion of Kentucky have at last been liberated by the conquering army of heroes under the command of Major-Gen. Kirby Smith. His advance has been announced for several weeks through the Federal papers, and his arrival was therefore not unexpected. Entering the Srd of the valor of the patriot heroes who, destitute of most of the comforts possessed by their vandal enemy, had marched over hundreds of miles of mountainous and unproductive country, for the purpose of delivering their down-trodden friends in Kentucky from oppression. On Monday morning, Gen. Smith's advance — Churchill's division — entered and occupied the city, without the slightest opposition, and were greeted with the most hearty cheers of the citizens. The people of this and all the s
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
d complete victory has not been achieved during the war. The confederate veterans did terrible execution among the hordes of raw levies opposing them; and though but a small portion of Gen. Smith's force was engaged, it was mere child's play for them, and scarcely impeded their onward march. General Nelson, who was himself among the wounded, succeeded in reaching Lexington on Sunday, followed by several small squads of his men, who arrived by different roads. In the mean time, a number of Ohio and Indiana regiments had reached here to reinforce Gen. Nelson; and these, together with Williams's and Jacob's Kentucky cavalry, which had also arrived, formed an apparently formidable army, and on Monday, when General Smith's approach was announced, confident predictions of the successful defence of Lexington were indulged in by Federal officers and their sympathizers. Towards night, however, rumor, with her usual truthfulness, announced that immense bodies of confederates were approachin
Big Creek Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
irby Smith, Major-General Commanding. Kentucky Statesman account. After passing many weary months under the oppressions of the ruthless military despotism of Mr. Lincoln's administration, the people of this portion of Kentucky have at last been liberated by the conquering army of heroes under the command of Major-Gen. Kirby Smith. His advance has been announced for several weeks through the Federal papers, and his arrival was therefore not unexpected. Entering the State through Big Creek Gap, (Cumberland Mountain,) some twenty miles south of Cumberland Gap, he took position in the rear of the Federal army stationed at the latter place under Gen. Morgan, effectually cutting off his communications, and rendering his surrender only a question of time. After several small and successful affairs on his march from the Gap, Gen. Smith arrived at Richmond (twenty-five miles from Lexington) on Saturday last, and at that place attacked and almost destroyed the Union army which had b
Richmond, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
Rebel reports and narratives. Official report of Kirby Smith. headquarters army of Kentucky, Richmond, Ky., Aug. 30, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.: sir: It is my great pleasure to announce to you that God has thrice blessed our arms to-day. After a forced march, almost day and night, for three days, over a mountain wilderness, destitute alike of food and water, I found the enemy drawn up in force to oppose us, at a point eight miles from this place. With less than half my force I attacked and carried a very strong position at Mount Zion Church, after a very hard fight of two hours; again, a still better position at White's Farm, in half an hour; and, finally, in this town, just before sunset, our indomitable troops deliberately walked (they were too tired to run) up to a magnificent position manned by ten thousand of the enemy, many of them perfectly fresh, and carried it in fifteen minutes. It is impossible for me now to
Cumberland Mountain (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
General Commanding. Kentucky Statesman account. After passing many weary months under the oppressions of the ruthless military despotism of Mr. Lincoln's administration, the people of this portion of Kentucky have at last been liberated by the conquering army of heroes under the command of Major-Gen. Kirby Smith. His advance has been announced for several weeks through the Federal papers, and his arrival was therefore not unexpected. Entering the State through Big Creek Gap, (Cumberland Mountain,) some twenty miles south of Cumberland Gap, he took position in the rear of the Federal army stationed at the latter place under Gen. Morgan, effectually cutting off his communications, and rendering his surrender only a question of time. After several small and successful affairs on his march from the Gap, Gen. Smith arrived at Richmond (twenty-five miles from Lexington) on Saturday last, and at that place attacked and almost destroyed the Union army which had been massed there un
the hordes of raw levies opposing them; and though but a small portion of Gen. Smith's force was engaged, it was mere child's play for them, and scarcely impeded their onward march. General Nelson, who was himself among the wounded, succeeded in reaching Lexington on Sunday, followed by several small squads of his men, who arrived by different roads. In the mean time, a number of Ohio and Indiana regiments had reached here to reinforce Gen. Nelson; and these, together with Williams's and Jacob's Kentucky cavalry, which had also arrived, formed an apparently formidable army, and on Monday, when General Smith's approach was announced, confident predictions of the successful defence of Lexington were indulged in by Federal officers and their sympathizers. Towards night, however, rumor, with her usual truthfulness, announced that immense bodies of confederates were approaching the city by all the roads, and a Federal panic began to develop itself. At night-fall a retreat was ordered
Rebel reports and narratives. Official report of Kirby Smith. headquarters army of Kentucky, Richmond, Ky., Aug. 30, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.: sir: It is my great pleasure to announce to you that God has thrice blessed our arms to-day. After a forced march, almost day and night, for three days, over a mountain wilderness, destitute alike of food and water, I found the enemy drawn up in force to oppose us, at a point eight miles from this place. With less than half my force I attacked and carried a very strong position at Mount Zion Church, after a very hard fight of two hours; again, a still better position at White's Farm, in half an hour; and, finally, in this town, just before sunset, our indomitable troops deliberately walked (they were too tired to run) up to a magnificent position manned by ten thousand of the enemy, many of them perfectly fresh, and carried it in fifteen minutes. It is impossible for me now to
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