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Barrancas (Barinas, Venezuela) (search for this): chapter 13
a battery of two ten-inch mortars, and another of two ten-inch columbiads, just above the residence of Col. Chase, which also mounted between them three forty-twos and two eight-inch guns. The light-house battery, rendered famous by the destructive fire it poured into Pickens during the January bombardment, remains intact. The guns have been removed. In the rear of the light-house was a mortar, supposed to be a ten-inch sea-coast. There were four batteries between the light-house and Barrancas, which mounted seven forty-twos and five eight-inch columbiads. Between Fort Barrancas and the barracks were four forty-twos in two batteries, which are still there, besides four ten-inch columbiads, which had been removed. Next to the hospital battery, to which I have referred, were four eight-inch columbiads, which did not open fire. Next in order was Wheet's battery, consisting of two ten-inch columbiads and three thirty-twos; Church's battery, with one ten-inch and two smaller guns.
Morristown (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ght of the Fort, escaped the torch of the incendiaries; but the magnificent naval hospital, said to be the finest structure of the kind in the United States, lies a mass of smouldering ruins. It was behind this hospital that Bragg had a heavy mortar battery during the first bombardment, and shielded from the fire of Pickens by the humane folds of the yellow flag which floated over the hospital, he kept up an incessant fire upon the Federal garrison. So general was the ruin of the towns of Woolsey and Warrington from the two bombardments, that there seemed but little remaining to feed the conflagration. No minute examination has been made of these villages, but it is reported that neither of them has suffered severely by the evacuation. The Navy-Yard presents a scene of ruin and desolation. Smoke and flames still rise from the burning timbers of the extensive store-houses, work-shops, and the wharves, all of which are destroyed. The skeleton frame of the old Fulton has vanish
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
h columbiads, which did not open fire. Next in order was Wheet's battery, consisting of two ten-inch columbiads and three thirty-twos; Church's battery, with one ten-inch and two smaller guns. There was a ten-inch columbiad mounted on a point in the Navy-Yard, and batteries of unknown number and strength lined the shore from the yard to Pensacola. At the mouth of Big Bayou there were two ten-inch and several smaller guns mounted. Nearly all the heavy guns used here were transported from Norfolk, after the seizure of that place by the rebels. Mobile Register account. Pensacola, May 10, 1862. The scenes of last night closed the long campaign of Pensacola — of its history you are sufficiently familiar. The order for the destruction of the Warrington Navy-Yard, and all public property at that place and Pensacola that could not be moved, was successfully carried into execution at the Yard and Pensacola. About half-past 11 o'clock, the signal being given by Brig.-Gen. Tho
Fort Gaines (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
rpose of fixing on a place for the mortar vessels to lie, and to plant buoys for the ships to run in by when they should arrive. Great excitement seemed to exist within the forts on the appearance of our steamers. I have reason to think that Fort Gaines was evacuated, and some were of opinion that the troops were leaving Fort Morgan, but I think that they were reinforcing it from Fort Gaines. One of our steamers, the Clifton, got ashore under the guns of Fort Morgan, which opened fire on hFort Gaines. One of our steamers, the Clifton, got ashore under the guns of Fort Morgan, which opened fire on her, and when they had got her range beautifully, and were throwing the shot over, they stopped firing. Lieut. Commanding Bald-win went to work coolly, and got his vessel off just as I sent him assistance, and while I had to cover him from Commander Randolph's gunboats, which were contemplating an attack on him. Thinking better of it, the Commodore went up to Mobile. The weather being bad, I sent the steamers back to Ship Island, and staid myself to relieve Lieut. Commanding Febiger, while
Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
tioned places burning fiercely, and mostly in ashes. Without communicating with the Fort, I proceeded to the town of Pensacola, where I found that Gen. Arnold had already sent Capt. Jackson, of the army, in the schooner Wood, to call upon the town to surrender. I sent for the Mayor on board the Harriet Lane, who promised that the citizens would behave themselves peacefully. I found that the rebels evacuated the place on hearing that our steamers, the day before, were going to run into Mobile Bay, and the squadron and mortar flotilla would soon follow them. A thousand rebels were encamped five miles outside of Mobile. They had destroyed everything that time would permit. Fort Barrancas, the Marine Barracks, Muster-Office in the yard, one new stone building, the smithery, I believe, and the shears, are still in a fair state of preservation. The yard was so hot that I did not go into it. Gen. Arnold having no steamer at command, and no means of transportation, I placed the Har
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Commander Randolph's gunboats, which were contemplating an attack on him. Thinking better of it, the Commodore went up to Mobile. The weather being bad, I sent the steamers back to Ship Island, and staid myself to relieve Lieut. Commanding Febige Bay, and the squadron and mortar flotilla would soon follow them. A thousand rebels were encamped five miles outside of Mobile. They had destroyed everything that time would permit. Fort Barrancas, the Marine Barracks, Muster-Office in the yard, as informed that three or four companies of cavalry were picketed some three or four miles from Pensacola, on the road to Mobile, and subsequently learned that there were one thousand dragoons. The rebels burned two steamers, the Bradford and Neiffieight, the steamer Harriet Lane, with Commander Porter, of the mortar flotilla, on board, was running down the coast from Mobile. The unusual and startling appearance of the sky indicated that something of a serious nature was transpiring, and Capt.
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
n the other side, when the troops took possession and hoisted once more the United States flag on the forts and Navy-Yard so long occupied by the rebels. We land ception, manifested unbounded joy at the arrival of a representative of the United States authority. He found the wharves in flames, and directed the people to extiith Gen. Arnold in reestablishing the dignity and enforcing the laws of the United States over this important position, despatched the following letter to his Honor the Mayor of Pensacola: United States steamer Harriet Lane, Pensacola, May 10, 1862. sir: I wish to confer with the authorities of this place, whoever they may bies in this town, towards the persons belonging to the naval vessels of the United States, will be treated as an inimical act, and will be resented as if it was assanificent naval hospital, said to be the finest structure of the kind in the United States, lies a mass of smouldering ruins. It was behind this hospital that Bragg
Deer Island (Canada) (search for this): chapter 13
s reported that neither of them has suffered severely by the evacuation. The Navy-Yard presents a scene of ruin and desolation. Smoke and flames still rise from the burning timbers of the extensive store-houses, work-shops, and the wharves, all of which are destroyed. The skeleton frame of the old Fulton has vanished into thin air, and the stocks where she stood so long are now an ash-heap. The splendid granite dock appears to be unharmed, and its wooden duplicate lies a wreck under Deer Island. The shears are standing in the yard. The foundry-building and the blacksmith-shop are safe, and the tall chimney still erect. The rebels made every preparation to burn the Custom-House, but were probably driven away by the fire from Fort Pickens, as it is uninjured. All the government buildings outside the yard were burned. The rebels removed all the heavy columbiads from the forts and batteries, but left many forty-two-pounders. When the fire broke out, twenty guns were seen in
Fort Barrancas (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
They had destroyed everything that time would permit. Fort Barrancas, the Marine Barracks, Muster-Office in the yard, one nnear the house of Gen. Chase, between the Light-house and Barrancas. Their tents and a large amount of equipments were secur first vessel that has passed under the guns of McRae and Barrancas for twelve months. The schooner proceeded up to the city ght-house was set on fire, but only slightly injured. Fort Barrancas sustained little injury from the vandals, owing to thehe old Spanish battery, and the redoubt in the rear of Fort Barrancas, are uninjured. Barrancas Barracks, an immense pile o The rebels left the keys of the magazines of McRae and Barrancas, and of the gates of the latter Fort, hanging against theen forty-twos and five eight-inch columbiads. Between Fort Barrancas and the barracks were four forty-twos in two batteriesa few minutes the whole works, gun-carriages, etc., in Forts Barrancas and McRae, and the hospitals, together with all the ot
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
n. About twelve hundred troops, together with a large amount of light artillery, siege-guns, ammunition, camp equipage, horses and supplies, have been conveyed across the channel, and are now actively employed in establishing themselves upon the sacred soil. They have thrown up defences, planted cannon, and taken every measure to prevent a surprise, in case the enemy should attempt to repossess the forts, of which, however, there is not the slightest fear. The confederates have abandoned Florida, and I doubt if five hundred rebel soldiers can be found in the State to-day. Last evening, Lieut. L. L. James, Second artillery, of Gen. Arnold's staff, with a boat's crew, crossed the channel to Fort McRae. Lieut. James raised the Stars and Stripes on the staff where the confederate rag has so long hung. A salute was fired in honor of the old ensign, and three cheers given for the Union and three for the flag. The Fort presented a sad spectacle of charred and smoking timbers, blacken
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