hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Pope 730 6 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 730 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 728 0 Browse Search
Irwin McDowell 650 0 Browse Search
Doc 510 0 Browse Search
T. C. H. Smith 496 2 Browse Search
Centreville (Virginia, United States) 466 0 Browse Search
F. Sigel 460 4 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 436 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 388 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 230 total hits in 132 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 131
al of the dead was unfounded. The prisoners stated that their force was more than a hundred thousand strong, and that McClellan commanded the army in person. Our loss is estimated at five thousand in killed, wounded and missing. The prisoners state that their ranks were greatly decimated, and that the slaughter was terrible, from which we may infer that the enemy's loss was fully as great, if not greater, than our own. The following is a list of commanding officers killed and wounded in the engagement: Gen. Stark, of Mississippi, commanding Jackson's division, killed. Brig.-Gen. Branch, of North-Carolina, killed. Brig.-Gen. R. H. Anderson, wounded in hip, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Wright, of Georgia, flesh wounds in breast and leg. Brig.-Gen. Lawton, in leg. Brig.-Gen. Armistead, in the foot. Brig.-Gen. Ripley, in neck, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Ransome, of North-Carolina, slightly. Col. Alfred Cummings, in command of Wilcox's brigade, slightly.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 131
Wounded: Major-General Anderson, of South-Carolina; Brigadier-General Anderson, of North-Carolina; General Lawton, of Georgia, in leg; General Wright, of Georgia, in leg; General Ripley, of South-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who sucGeorgia, in leg; General Ripley, of South-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who succeeded Ripley in command, slightly; Colonel Magill, of Georgia regulars, lost an arm; Majors Sorrell and Walton, of Longstreet's staff; Colonel Gordon and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, of the Sixth Alabama, Captain Reedy, of the Third Alabama, (wounGeorgia regulars, lost an arm; Majors Sorrell and Walton, of Longstreet's staff; Colonel Gordon and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, of the Sixth Alabama, Captain Reedy, of the Third Alabama, (wounded and missing at Boonesboro Gap;) Colonel Alfred Cumming, of the Tenth Georgia; Major Tracy, badly, and Captain Watson, of the Sixth Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Sloan, of the Fifty-third Georgia; Colonel Jones, of the Twenty-second Georgia; Lieuteanch, of North-Carolina, killed. Brig.-Gen. R. H. Anderson, wounded in hip, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Wright, of Georgia, flesh wounds in breast and leg. Brig.-Gen. Lawton, in leg. Brig.-Gen. Armistead, in the foot. Brig.-Gen. Riple
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 131
it is, and comprises only such names as I have been able to gather up during the progress of the fight. My arrangements have all been made to procure full, as far as possible, correct lists of the killed and wounded, provided the army should not move immediately. But I cannot say more at this time. This brief and hastily written note is designed to be the forerunner only of my account of the battle, and is sent now because an opportunity is offered to forward it to the post-office at Winchester. I will only add, that the timely appearance of McLaws on the left, about nine o'clock in the morning, saved the day on that part of the field, and that to Toombs we are indebted for saving it in the afternoon on the right. Both charges were brilliantly successful. A. P. Hill got up at two P. M., and went in at four, and contributed largely to the success of the day. Nearly all the troops behaved with great spirit. Again I say — and with this remark I conclude this note — the prosp
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 131
the contest was carried on mainly by artillery, with which both the enemy and ourselves were abundantly supplied. The only difference between the two, if any at all, was in the superiority of their metal and positions, and on our part the lack of sufficient ammunition. Battery after battery was sent to the rear exhausted, and our ordnance wagons, until late in the day, were on the opposite side of the Potomac, blocked up by the long commissary trains which had been ordered forward from Martinsburgh and Shepherdstown to relieve the necessities of the army. As indicated in the former part of this letter, our artillery was posted on the summits of the line of hills which ran from right to left in front of the town. That of the enemy, with one exception, was on the rising ground at the base of the Blue Ridge, and upon the various eminences this side. A single Federal battery was boldly thrown over the stone bridge on the turnpike, nine hundred or a thousand yards in our front, and
Sharpsburg (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 131
f whatever similar movements may have been attempted by us. Our loss is variously estimated at from five to nine thousand. Savannah Republican account. Sharpsburgh, September 17, 9 P. M. A bloody battle has been fought to day. It commenced at daylight and lasted until eight o'clock at night--fourteen hours. The enemy mao return to Virginia. P. W. A. Richmond Inquirer account. Richmond, September 23. We have received authentic particulars of the sanguinary battle at Sharpsburgh alluded to elsewhere, and concerning which so many painful rumors were afloat on yesterday. We have the gratification of being able to announce that the battle Jackson, and gradually became general. Both armies maintained their respective positions, and fought desperately throughout the entire day. During this battle Sharpsburgh was fired by the enemy's shells, and at one time the enemy obtained a position which enabled them to pour a flanking fire upon a portion of our left wing, causi
orrell and Walton, of Longstreet's staff; Colonel Gordon and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, of the Sixth Alabama, Captain Reedy, of the Third Alabama, (wounded and missing at Boonesboro Gap;) Colonel Alfred Cumming, of the Tenth Georgia; Major Tracy, badly, and Captain Watson, of the Sixth Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Sloan, of the Fifty-third Georgia; Colonel Jones, of the Twenty-second Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Crowder, badly, of the Thirty-first Georgia; Major Lewis, Captains Harney and St. Martin, and Lieutenants Murphy, Cook, Current, Dea, Montgomery, Bryant, Wren, Birdsall, and McJimsey, of the Eighth Louisiana; Colonel Penn, Captains Frank Clark and O'Connor, and Lieutenants Smith, Orr and Martin, of the Sixth Louisiana; Captains Herrin, Morgan and Harper, and Lieutenants Knox, Tarpey, Flower, Talbot, and Wells, of the Seventh Louisiana; Major Menger, Captain Hart and Lieut. Patterson, of the Fifth Louisiana; Colonel Hately, Lieutenant-Colonel T. B. Lamar, Sergeant-Major Anderso
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 131
Read's Georgia battery. Also, Col. Strong, Captains Ritchie and Calloway, and Lieutenants Little and Lynne of the Sixth Louisiana, and Captain McFarland and Lieutenant Newman, of the Seventh Louisiana. Wounded: Major-General Anderson, of South-Carolina; Brigadier-General Anderson, of North-Carolina; General Lawton, of Georgia, in leg; General Wright, of Georgia, in leg; General Ripley, of South-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who succeeded Ripley in command, slightly; Colonel MagSouth-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who succeeded Ripley in command, slightly; Colonel Magill, of Georgia regulars, lost an arm; Majors Sorrell and Walton, of Longstreet's staff; Colonel Gordon and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, of the Sixth Alabama, Captain Reedy, of the Third Alabama, (wounded and missing at Boonesboro Gap;) Colonel Alfred Cumming, of the Tenth Georgia; Major Tracy, badly, and Captain Watson, of the Sixth Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Sloan, of the Fifty-third Georgia; Colonel Jones, of the Twenty-second Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Crowder, badly, of the Thirty-first
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 131
, and Captain McFarland and Lieutenant Newman, of the Seventh Louisiana. Wounded: Major-General Anderson, of South-Carolina; Brigadier-General Anderson, of North-Carolina; General Lawton, of Georgia, in leg; General Wright, of Georgia, in leg; General Ripley, of South-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who succeeded Ripst of commanding officers killed and wounded in the engagement: Gen. Stark, of Mississippi, commanding Jackson's division, killed. Brig.-Gen. Branch, of North-Carolina, killed. Brig.-Gen. R. H. Anderson, wounded in hip, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Wright, of Georgia, flesh wounds in breast and leg. Brig.-Gen. Lawtonunded in hip, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Wright, of Georgia, flesh wounds in breast and leg. Brig.-Gen. Lawton, in leg. Brig.-Gen. Armistead, in the foot. Brig.-Gen. Ripley, in neck, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Ransome, of North-Carolina, slightly. Col. Alfred Cummings, in command of Wilcox's brigade, slightly.
Georgetown (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 131
on. Battery after battery was sent to the rear exhausted, and our ordnance wagons, until late in the day, were on the opposite side of the Potomac, blocked up by the long commissary trains which had been ordered forward from Martinsburgh and Shepherdstown to relieve the necessities of the army. As indicated in the former part of this letter, our artillery was posted on the summits of the line of hills which ran from right to left in front of the town. That of the enemy, with one exception,ad determined upon a flank movement towards Harper's Ferry, and thus obtain a position in our rear. General Lee, with steady foresight, anticipated the movement by drawing the main body of his army back on the south side of the Potomac, at Shepherdstown, Va., whence he will, of course, project the necessary combinations for again defeating his adversary. The enemy's artillery was served with disastrous effect upon our gallant troops; but they replied from musket, howitzer, and cannon with a
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 131
blow. It was now about three o'clock in the afternoon, but notwithstanding the strange lull in the storm, no one believed it would not be renewed before night. Intelligence has come from the rear that General A. P. Hill was advancing from Harper's Ferry with the force which Jackson had left behind, and every eye was turned anxiously in that direction. In a little while we saw some of his troops moving cautiously, under cover of the woods and hills, to the front, and in an hour more he was id kept them from the position during the rest of the day. It being evident that the Young Napoleon, finding he could not force his way through the invincible ranks of our army in that direction, had determined upon a flank movement towards Harper's Ferry, and thus obtain a position in our rear. General Lee, with steady foresight, anticipated the movement by drawing the main body of his army back on the south side of the Potomac, at Shepherdstown, Va., whence he will, of course, project the n
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...