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New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 159
Doc. 148.-capture of Hamilton, N. C. Newbern, N. C., July 15. An engagement of no little importance took place on the morning of the ninth instant, on Roanoke River, some sixty miles from its mouth, between three of our gunboats, the Commodore Perry, Ceres, and Shawsheen, and a company of Hawkins's Zouaves, under Capt. Hammell, on our side, and a regiment of rebel cavalry, supported by a strong force of infantry and artillery, and a rebel fort which commanded the river. The particulars are as follows : On the eighth instant Capt. Flusser, of the Commodore Perry, who is commanding officer of the naval forces in Albemarle Sound, decided to make a reconnoissance up the Roanoke as far as Hamilton, where he understood a rebel steamer was anchored, and also that the enemy were erecting a fortification and collecting a large force, with the intention of resisting all approaches to Weldon by the river. After taking on board Captain Hammell's company of Zouaves, which are stati
Roanoke (United States) (search for this): chapter 159
Doc. 148.-capture of Hamilton, N. C. Newbern, N. C., July 15. An engagement of no little importance took place on the morning of the ninth instant, on Roanoke River, some sixty miles from its mouth, between three of our gunboats, the Commodore Perry, Ceres, and Shawsheen, and a company of Hawkins's Zouaves, under Capt. Hammell, on our side, and a regiment of rebel cavalry, supported by a strong force of infantry and artillery, and a rebel fort which commanded the river. The partiction and collecting a large force, with the intention of resisting all approaches to Weldon by the river. After taking on board Captain Hammell's company of Zouaves, which are stationed at Plymouth, (a very important point at the mouth of the Roanoke, and also the headquarters of the naval force in the Albemarle Sound,) the fleet proceeded up the river at a rapid rate, meeting with no difficulties until they arrived at a point some six miles above Williamston, where a barricade of rafts and
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 159
ed to make a reconnoissance up the Roanoke as far as Hamilton, where he understood a rebel steamer was anchored, and also that the enemy were erecting a fortification and collecting a large force, with the intention of resisting all approaches to Weldon by the river. After taking on board Captain Hammell's company of Zouaves, which are stationed at Plymouth, (a very important point at the mouth of the Roanoke, and also the headquarters of the naval force in the Albemarle Sound,) the fleet promy, and a splinter sent into his throat from a ball which struck the deck near his head. Captain Woodward, Capt. Macdiarmid, and Capt. Flusser each had very narrow escapes. This victory is of great importance, inasmuch as it clears the way to Weldon. It is impossible to estimate the loss to the enemy, who, it is said, left some forty or fifty dead on the field. Since the departure of Gen. Burnside with a part of his army for Virginia, Acting Major-Gen. Foster, the wheel-horse of the Burn
Williamston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 159
hat the enemy were erecting a fortification and collecting a large force, with the intention of resisting all approaches to Weldon by the river. After taking on board Captain Hammell's company of Zouaves, which are stationed at Plymouth, (a very important point at the mouth of the Roanoke, and also the headquarters of the naval force in the Albemarle Sound,) the fleet proceeded up the river at a rapid rate, meeting with no difficulties until they arrived at a point some six miles above Williamston, where a barricade of rafts and piles were chained together, reaching transversely up and across the river. Just before the fleet arrived at the barricade, a deadly fire from infantry in an ambush was opened upon the Ceres, which was in the advance, killing one seaman, John H. Bridges, of Danvers, Mass., and wounding several more. The Ceres immediately responded with grape, which, with some timely and well-directed shells from the Perry and Shawsheen, soon dispersed the cowardly assassi
Bluff Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 159
the ninth instant, on Roanoke River, some sixty miles from its mouth, between three of our gunboats, the Commodore Perry, Ceres, and Shawsheen, and a company of Hawkins's Zouaves, under Capt. Hammell, on our side, and a regiment of rebel cavalry, supported by a strong force of infantry and artillery, and a rebel fort which commanded the river. The particulars are as follows : On the eighth instant Capt. Flusser, of the Commodore Perry, who is commanding officer of the naval forces in Albemarle Sound, decided to make a reconnoissance up the Roanoke as far as Hamilton, where he understood a rebel steamer was anchored, and also that the enemy were erecting a fortification and collecting a large force, with the intention of resisting all approaches to Weldon by the river. After taking on board Captain Hammell's company of Zouaves, which are stationed at Plymouth, (a very important point at the mouth of the Roanoke, and also the headquarters of the naval force in the Albemarle Sound,
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 159
-directed shells from the Perry and Shawsheen, soon dispersed the cowardly assassins with heavy loss, who then pushed on to the fort at Hamilton, to assist their comrades in resisting us at that point. On arriving at the barricade Capt. Flusser proceeded at once to blow up and destroy the obstructions in his usual dashing way. It was not long before he succeeded in cutting his way through this difficult blockade, which was considered by the enemy quite as strong as the barricade in the James River. On went the fleet up this narrow river, darkened by a dense forest on each side, through a continuous storm of bullets and grape from the innumerable masked batteries which lined both banks of the river on the bluff commanding the approach to Hamilton. Hamilton is situated upon an eminence, back some distance from the river, and separated from this important stream by a thick growth of heavy timber, which sheltered the hidden foe, who were raining down an incessant fire upon our gunboa
Plymouth, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 159
follows : On the eighth instant Capt. Flusser, of the Commodore Perry, who is commanding officer of the naval forces in Albemarle Sound, decided to make a reconnoissance up the Roanoke as far as Hamilton, where he understood a rebel steamer was anchored, and also that the enemy were erecting a fortification and collecting a large force, with the intention of resisting all approaches to Weldon by the river. After taking on board Captain Hammell's company of Zouaves, which are stationed at Plymouth, (a very important point at the mouth of the Roanoke, and also the headquarters of the naval force in the Albemarle Sound,) the fleet proceeded up the river at a rapid rate, meeting with no difficulties until they arrived at a point some six miles above Williamston, where a barricade of rafts and piles were chained together, reaching transversely up and across the river. Just before the fleet arrived at the barricade, a deadly fire from infantry in an ambush was opened upon the Ceres, whic
Hamilton, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 159
Doc. 148.-capture of Hamilton, N. C. Newbern, N. C., July 15. An engagement of no little importance took place on the morning of the ninth instant, on Roa in Albemarle Sound, decided to make a reconnoissance up the Roanoke as far as Hamilton, where he understood a rebel steamer was anchored, and also that the enemy werrsed the cowardly assassins with heavy loss, who then pushed on to the fort at Hamilton, to assist their comrades in resisting us at that point. On arriving at thees which lined both banks of the river on the bluff commanding the approach to Hamilton. Hamilton is situated upon an eminence, back some distance from the river, anwere landed, with a howitzer, and with fixed bayonets commenced the advance on Hamilton, accompanied with a strong company from each of our gunboats, armed in the samrt, which they took, despite a strong opposition, together with the village of Hamilton, over which the Stars and Stripes were raised, with an additional outbreak of
Danvers (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 159
he headquarters of the naval force in the Albemarle Sound,) the fleet proceeded up the river at a rapid rate, meeting with no difficulties until they arrived at a point some six miles above Williamston, where a barricade of rafts and piles were chained together, reaching transversely up and across the river. Just before the fleet arrived at the barricade, a deadly fire from infantry in an ambush was opened upon the Ceres, which was in the advance, killing one seaman, John H. Bridges, of Danvers, Mass., and wounding several more. The Ceres immediately responded with grape, which, with some timely and well-directed shells from the Perry and Shawsheen, soon dispersed the cowardly assassins with heavy loss, who then pushed on to the fort at Hamilton, to assist their comrades in resisting us at that point. On arriving at the barricade Capt. Flusser proceeded at once to blow up and destroy the obstructions in his usual dashing way. It was not long before he succeeded in cutting his way
Doc. 148.-capture of Hamilton, N. C. Newbern, N. C., July 15. An engagement of no little importance took place on the morning of the ninth instant, on Roanoke River, some sixty miles from its mouth, between three of our gunboats, the Commodore Perry, Ceres, and Shawsheen, and a company of Hawkins's Zouaves, under Capt. Hammell, on our side, and a regiment of rebel cavalry, supported by a strong force of infantry and artillery, and a rebel fort which commanded the river. The particulars are as follows : On the eighth instant Capt. Flusser, of the Commodore Perry, who is commanding officer of the naval forces in Albemarle Sound, decided to make a reconnoissance up the Roanoke as far as Hamilton, where he understood a rebel steamer was anchored, and also that the enemy were erecting a fortification and collecting a large force, with the intention of resisting all approaches to Weldon by the river. After taking on board Captain Hammell's company of Zouaves, which are stat
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