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Hanover County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Doc. 16.-battle of Hanover Court-House, Va. A correspondent of the New-York World gives the following account of this fight: Huntingdon, Hanover County, Va., (Sixteen Miles North of Richmond,) Wednesday, May 28. One of the most brilliant movements and achievements yet accomplished by any of our armies was consummated with the setting of yes terday's sun. The rapidity which which it was done and the happy results following it, all combine to mark it as a living incident in the history of this army's work, which history shall fitly preserve and time never wipe out. The outline of operations is briefly this: For some days past the enemy have been throwing forces upon our right flank, in the direction of Hanover Court-House, extending their pickets to Old Church, thus annoying our right and even threatening our communications with our waterbase. It became necessary to dispose of this force, as well as to cut the communications of the enemy by the Virginia Central and Rich
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
e but a mile and a half west of us. The Twenty-second Massachusetts, Col. Gove, was ordered to strike the track, disable the road, and then march northward on it, joining the main body two or three miles above. The regiment obeyed, and as will subsequently be seen, did their work. A brief allusion as to what we hoped to find at or near Hanover is proper here. As late as Sunday, the twenty-fifth instant, a strong brigade of rebels had been posted there, believed to be composed of six North-Carolina regiments, commanded by Lawrence O'Brien Branch, formerly member of Congress, but more latterly brigadier-general, with the smell of defeat upon his garments, he having encountered Burnside at Newbern in March last, the retreat from which, it will be seen, did not prove to be his last march. His regiments are: Seventh, Twelfth, Eighteenth, Twenty-eighth, Thirty-third, and Thirty-eighth North-Carolina State troops. Their strength is represented by members of the same to approach nearly
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
g. For more than an hour consecrated by bravery like this, that mere handful of men held the enemy in check. At length the sound of distant cheers was heard. It was the Third brigade hastening to their relief. In line of battle, Sixteenth Michigan on the left and Eighty-third Pennsylvania on the right, they were pressing through the ploughed fields, straight for the heaviest fire. Up lode General Butterfield, whose uncovered head at this moment struck you as more than ordinarily like Napoleon's. Ah! Here comes the little General, says one. Now for the double-quick. Yes, my boys, now you see the use of double-quick. Oh! Yes; oh! Yes. Well, then, three rousing cheers to encourage our brave fellows yonder. The effect was electric. Those men who had already marched eighteen miles through drenching rain and bottomless roads, and chased the enemy two miles more, took up the double-quick, caught the General's cheer and sent it increased many fold through the ranks of the enemy,
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
om Butterfield and McQuade, who drove from the ground a force superior to the whole of ours engaged at any one time. Butterfield's efforts, from first to last, were productive of the very best results. The results are more than we expected. Up to this hour, over six hundred prisoners. Gen. Stoneman captured a railway-train. Another account. Butterpield's brigade, Porter's division, Fifth provisional army corps, camp near Hanover Court-House, Va., May 29. Fort Donelson, Pittsburgh Landing, Williamsburgh, Hanover, and Fair Oaks illustrate in this war, what is a remarkable fact in the campaigns of both classic and modern times, that the most drenching storms and the deepest mud have not been able to deter energetic commanders and vigorous troops from making long marches or fighting hard battles. The old division of Gen. Fitz-John Porter, now commanded by its ranking general, Brig.-Gen. Morell, received, on the night of the twenty-sixth instant, orders to move on the fo
McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ations is briefly this: For some days past the enemy have been throwing forces upon our right flank, in the direction of Hanover Court-House, extending their pickets to Old Church, thus annoying our right and even threatening our communications with our waterbase. It became necessary to dispose of this force, as well as to cut the communications of the enemy by the Virginia Central and Richmond and Fredericksburgh railroads. A heavy force was therefore thrown suddenly between Richmond and Hanover yesterday morning, two spirited and even severe engagements fought, the enemy totally dispersed with heavy loss, our flank cleared, and the railroad disabled. The force selected for this important work was Gen. G. W. Morell's division of Gen. Fitz-John Porter's Fifth Provisional Army Corps. I have in former letters fitly spoken of this spirited and admirably disciplined body of men. No words of adulation from my pen can add to the honor won by them yesterday. Every bosom breathes a fer
Marin (Nuevo Leon, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 16
for a fight. Col. Johnson boldly pressed forward, and engaged them at close range, making hot work of it for both sides, for at least fifteen minutes before any supports arrived. The enemy were driven from behind their sheltering places, but suddenly a force of them appeared from the woods, on the right flank of the Twenty-fifth, and succeeded in capturing a part of company G, carrying them to their rear promptly as prisoners. Col. Johnson now anxiously looked for help, when a section of Marin's Massachusetts battery came up, followed by a couple of pieces from Griffin's regular battery, which soon fixed the earnest attention of the rebels who were firing grape and shell from their twelve-pound howitzers with great vigor. Here comes the surprise. From the cool and determined stand of the rebels, it was evident that they conceived the force in sight to be our total strength, and that it would,be an easy matter to repulse or capture it. But word had gone to Gen. Butterfield, who s
O'brien Branch (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
econd Massachusetts, Col. Gove, was ordered to strike the track, disable the road, and then march northward on it, joining the main body two or three miles above. The regiment obeyed, and as will subsequently be seen, did their work. A brief allusion as to what we hoped to find at or near Hanover is proper here. As late as Sunday, the twenty-fifth instant, a strong brigade of rebels had been posted there, believed to be composed of six North-Carolina regiments, commanded by Lawrence O'Brien Branch, formerly member of Congress, but more latterly brigadier-general, with the smell of defeat upon his garments, he having encountered Burnside at Newbern in March last, the retreat from which, it will be seen, did not prove to be his last march. His regiments are: Seventh, Twelfth, Eighteenth, Twenty-eighth, Thirty-third, and Thirty-eighth North-Carolina State troops. Their strength is represented by members of the same to approach nearly to the maximum standard of one thousand men each
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ubsequently be seen, did their work. A brief allusion as to what we hoped to find at or near Hanover is proper here. As late as Sunday, the twenty-fifth instant, a strong brigade of rebels had beroach nearly to the maximum standard of one thousand men each. This force was certainly all at Hanover on Sunday. From secession, but reliable sources, we learn further that it was the intention of the enemy to reenforce the position strongly. By throwing a strong column between Hanover and Richmond, this force might be cut off, and possibly captured entire. This was our hope; now for the recluded, to move forward rapidly, as it was expected to meet the enemy in large force at or near Hanover. Col. Gove returned to the railroad, remarking that there were evidences of an attempt by the amp near Hanover Court-House, Va., May 29. Fort Donelson, Pittsburgh Landing, Williamsburgh, Hanover, and Fair Oaks illustrate in this war, what is a remarkable fact in the campaigns of both class
Alexandria (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ter's. Closely pressing the enemy, and capturing some thirty prisoners, among them a captain and half his company, the Eighty-third Pennsylvania hurried up the road in the direction of Hanover Court-House. There Gen. Butterfield received intelligence from Gen. Porter that the enemy was in our rear, and to return at once. Now commenced the marching such as no troops under the sun could have endured except those who had been subjected to their five months severe drill on the banks of the Potomac. Meantime the Forty-fourth New-York, when the enemy made his appearance a second time for the purpose named, had been ordered up with a section of Martin's battery, and soon found itself subjected to a cross-fire from a much superior force. Clearly the enemy thought his work easy. A fragment of the Twenty-fifth New-York, the Second Maine, and the Forty-fourth New-York, lying in the open road, were exposed to the galling fire of an enemy concealed and protected by a close fence in the
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
rave regiments from Butterfield and McQuade, who drove from the ground a force superior to the whole of ours engaged at any one time. Butterfield's efforts, from first to last, were productive of the very best results. The results are more than we expected. Up to this hour, over six hundred prisoners. Gen. Stoneman captured a railway-train. Another account. Butterpield's brigade, Porter's division, Fifth provisional army corps, camp near Hanover Court-House, Va., May 29. Fort Donelson, Pittsburgh Landing, Williamsburgh, Hanover, and Fair Oaks illustrate in this war, what is a remarkable fact in the campaigns of both classic and modern times, that the most drenching storms and the deepest mud have not been able to deter energetic commanders and vigorous troops from making long marches or fighting hard battles. The old division of Gen. Fitz-John Porter, now commanded by its ranking general, Brig.-Gen. Morell, received, on the night of the twenty-sixth instant, orders
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