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Washington (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
with great patience. For seven days they had had skirmishing with the rebels and had taken over four hundred prisoners and liberated about thirty of Banks' men. After fourteen days of continued work the battle comes, and now what was the condition of our men? Of course they were not in the best. Many were sick-our force was weak. The division of Blenker, although strong in numbers, was nevertheless weak, for they had become so demoralized by their excesses on their various marches from Washington, that there was a lack of discipline, a thing indispensable to a good soldier. Under circumstances such as these, Gen. Fremont fought the battle of Cross Keys. Did it not require a man with a stout heart and steady hand? In spite of all untoward circumstances he gained much, and but for the misfortune on the left would have captured Gen. Jackson with both army and baggage. Do you ask why it is called Cross Keys? Well, there is, about the middle of the battle-ground, a store-house,
Mount Jackson (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ng. During the day they obtained possession of the enemy's ground, which was disputed foot by foot, and only withdrew at evening when ordered to retire to a suitable position for the night. The skill and gallantry displayed by Cluseret on this and frequent former occasions during the pursuit in which we have been engaged deserve high praise. Respectfully, J. C. Fremont, Major-General. General Schenck's report. headquarters Schenck's brigade, Mountain Department, camp at Mt. Jackson, Va., June 12. Col. Albert Tracy, A. A.G.: I have the honor to report the part taken by the Ohio brigade, in the engagement at Cross Keys, on the eighth instant. It was about one o'clock P. M. when I arrived near the point of the road leading to Port Republic, where the advance-guard had already come upon the enemy. A staff-officer, after indicating the position where my cavalry was to be left in reserve, informed me that I was to pass into the field and take position on the right, fo
Union Church (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
Doc. 18.-battle of cross Keys, Va. Gen. Fremont's despatches. Headquarters army in the field, camp near Port Republic, June 8, 9 P. M. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: the army left Harrisonburgh at six o'clock this morning, and at half-past 8 my advance engaged the rebels about seven miles from that place, near Union Church. The enemy was very advantageously posted in the timber, having chosen his own position, forming a smaller circle than our own, and with his troops formed in masses. It consisted undoubtedly of Jackson's entire force. The battle began with heavy firing at eleven o'clock, and lasted with great obstinacy and violence until four in the afternoon, some skirmishing and artillery firing continuing from that time until dark. Our troops fought occasionally under the murderous fire of greatly superior numbers — the hottest of the small-arm fire being on the left wing, which was held by Stahl's brigade, consisting of five regiments. The bayon
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
the enemy again in the morning. I regret to have to state that in the night a party detailed from the battalion of Connecticut cavalry, Sergeant Morehouse and four men of company D, being sent to ascertain the position of Col. Cluseret, commandifth Ohio444 Eighty-second Ohio,374   Total Infantry,2138  Men.Guns. DeBeck's battery,946 Rigby's battery,915 Connecticut cavalry,113  The casualties were, altogether, but four killed, seven wounded, and four missing. I append in a seph; Col. Cantwell, of the Eighty-second; Capt. De Beck, of the First Ohio artillery, and Capt. Blakeslee, of company A, Connecticut cavalry, commanding my guard. To the officers of my Staff also--Capt. Don Piatt, A. A.G.; Capt. Margedant, of Enginowing that he had removed, Gen. Schenck, after dark, sent out Sergt. John B. Morehouse and four privates of company D, Connecticut cavalry, in search of him. But in the mean time the Colonel had changed his forces. Morehouse did not return, and he
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
Doc. 18.-battle of cross Keys, Va. Gen. Fremont's despatches. Headquarters army in the field, camp near Port Republic, June 8, 9 P. M. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: the army left Harrisonburgh at six o'clock this morning, and at half-past 8 my advance engaged the rebels about seven miles from that place, near Union Church. The enemy was very advantageously posted in the timber, having chosen his own position, forming a smaller circle than our own, and with his troops formed in masses. It consisted undoubtedly of Jackson's entire force. The battle began with heavy firing at eleven o'clock, and lasted with great obstinacy and violence until four in the afternoon, some skirmishing and artillery firing continuing from that time until dark. Our troops fought occasionally under the murderous fire of greatly superior numbers — the hottest of the small-arm fire being on the left wing, which was held by Stahl's brigade, consisting of five regiments. The bayo
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
over some wheat-fields, along the edge of another wood. This I accomplished without loss, though exposed to a pretty severe fire of shell from the enemy, marching my line, composed of the Seventy-third, Fifty-fifth, and Eighty-second regiments of Ohio volunteer infantry, directed by the flank, detaching the Seventy-fifth and Thirty-second Ohio to cover the artillery moving by a more circuitous route. While effecting this, I was ordered by a message from the General commanding to detach Rigby'sa more severe struggle than ever. Many thought the rebels to be in force in their old position, while others were of the opinion that they would make a final stand at or near this place. This, in connection with a desire to present you a list of Ohio and Indiana killed and wounded, has induced me to delay writing till to-day. Sunday morning dawned bright and beautiful. The birds were singing their sweet melodies as if in worship of Him who made the Sabbath, and the soft air that came balmi
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
summer was well-nigh here. A movement had been ordered that morning. They say that history shows that battles begun on Sunday seldom are successes for the attacking party. Whether this will prove an exception to the general rule, I will not say, but leave the sequel to tell. A reconnoissance made on Saturday by Gen. Milroy, with the Second, Third, Fifth and Eighth Virginia, and Fifty-fifth and Sixtieth Ohio, clearly revealed the fact that Jackson, after having travelled the pike from Winchester, had suddenly turned to the left in the direction of Port Republic, over a miserably bad road, and with the intention of crossing the river. At this place, twelve miles south-east of Harrisonburgh, was a bridge over the Shenandoah. Other bridges had previously been destroyed, and it seemed pretty clear that he intended to use this. Part of Shields's force, as early as Saturday, had a little fight over the bridge, but could not hold it. Early in the morning the army was in motion, Co
Cross Keys (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
Ohio and Eighth Virginia, afterward supported by the Garibaldi Guard, formed our advance, and commenced the <*>attle of Cross Keys, by sharp skirmishing, at nine o'clock in the morning. During the day they obtained possession of the enemy's ground, 12. Col. Albert Tracy, A. A.G.: I have the honor to report the part taken by the Ohio brigade, in the engagement at Cross Keys, on the eighth instant. It was about one o'clock P. M. when I arrived near the point of the road leading to Port Repe opposite side of the river. An unfordable river was between them, and the only bridge was in flames. The battle of P Cross Keys was now a matter of history, and the famous pursuit of Jackson and his army was at an end. Gen. Fremont had left Fra the misfortune on the left would have captured Gen. Jackson with both army and baggage. Do you ask why it is called Cross Keys? Well, there is, about the middle of the battle-ground, a store-house, a church, and a house or two; this is called by
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
nt's despatches. Headquarters army in the field, camp near Port Republic, June 8, 9 P. M. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: the army left Harrisonburgh at six o'clock this morning, and at half-past 8 my advance engaged the rebels about seven miles from that place, near Union Church. The enemy was very advantageously posted in the timber, having chosen his own position, forming a smaller circle than our own, and with his troops formed in masses. It consisted undoubtedly of Jackson's entire force. The battle began with heavy firing at eleven o'clock, and lasted with great obstinacy and violence until four in the afternoon, some skirmishing and artillery firing continuing from that time until dark. Our troops fought occasionally under the murderous fire of greatly superior numbers — the hottest of the small-arm fire being on the left wing, which was held by Stahl's brigade, consisting of five regiments. The bayonet and canister-shot were used freely and with gre
Petersburgh (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
almost interminable train could be seen winding along like a huge snake, in the distant valley. Several regiments were drawn in line of battle on the opposite side of the river. An unfordable river was between them, and the only bridge was in flames. The battle of P Cross Keys was now a matter of history, and the famous pursuit of Jackson and his army was at an end. Gen. Fremont had left Franklin on Sunday, May twenty-fifth, taking up his line of march for the valley of Virginia. At Petersburgh he had left his tents and heavy baggage. With one exception, he had marched sixteen consecutive days. The rains had been heavy and severe. Frequently our soldiers had bivouacked in water and mud, and lain down in their drenched clothes to steal a little sleep, to have a dream of the loved ones at home, and to have a very few hours of rest that they might endure the fatigues of the coming day. Transportation had been difficult. Forage was scarce, the country having been cleaned of such
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