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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Pass Christian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
Doc. 21.-taking of pass Christian, Miss. A rebel account. Pass Christian, Miss., April 6, 1862. The inhabitants of the Pass were aroused from their slumbers on Friday morning, April fourth, at an early hour, by the report of cannon in the direction of Ship. Island. As soon as daylight appeared it was discovered that the confederate gunboats Pamlico, Oregon and Carondelet were hotly engaged with four of the Federal fleet, and were slowly retiring towards the Pass, under a heavy fi streets, with the Stars and Stripes floating high in the air, in the direction of (as I was told by one of the officers) Tugville. The enemy appeared to be fully informed in regard to the number and location of our troops and the affairs of Pass Christian generally. Prominent individuals were inquired after, and in one instance a young lady's name was familiarly mentioned. The little remnant of our boys --about two hundred and fifty in all, under the command of Lieut.-Colonel Mellon, who had
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
mer Lewis, and left the Pass, to the infinite relief of the inhabitants. The force of the enemy, as admitted by themselves, was one thousand four hundred, and was composed in part of the Ninth regiment of Connecticut volunteers, belonging to the Irish brigade. The officers generally were spirited and fine-looking men, and the soldiers well armed and equipped, and appeared in excellent condition. We were informed by one of the men that the forces under command of Gen. Butler, now upon Ship Island, amount to fourteen thousand, and that fifteen thousand more were expected daily to arrive; that they occasionally get the New-Orleans papers and receive a mail twice a month from New-York. That they are fully posted as regards the affairs of the coast we believe, and that we have had and now have traitors in our midst no one can for a moment doubt. The officers with whom we conversed express the belief, in all apparent sincerity, that the rebellion will be put down and the Southern C
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
sty retreat. Not one of our men was wounded and but one taken prisoner, and he not until he had fired at and wounded a Lincolnite severely in the arm. Not a musket or cannon was lost by our men. The enemy returned to the Pass at early candle-light, immediately embarked on board the steamer Lewis, and left the Pass, to the infinite relief of the inhabitants. The force of the enemy, as admitted by themselves, was one thousand four hundred, and was composed in part of the Ninth regiment of Connecticut volunteers, belonging to the Irish brigade. The officers generally were spirited and fine-looking men, and the soldiers well armed and equipped, and appeared in excellent condition. We were informed by one of the men that the forces under command of Gen. Butler, now upon Ship Island, amount to fourteen thousand, and that fifteen thousand more were expected daily to arrive; that they occasionally get the New-Orleans papers and receive a mail twice a month from New-York. That they ar
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
t appeared it was discovered that the confederate gunboats Pamlico, Oregon and Carondelet were hotly engaged with four of the Federal fleet, and were slowly retiring towards the Pass, under a heavy fire of the enemy. On the arrival here of our gallant little fleet it was ascertained that the Oregon had been struck by a shell in the pilot-house, and that the Carondelet had been hit in the wheelhouse. Neither boat, however, being seriously damaged, they proceeded at once on their way to New-Orleans, the enemy at the same time advancing slowly with the iron gunboats New-London, Jackson and Hatteras, and the steamer Lewis, the latter having on board large numbers of Lincolnite troops. When within a short distance of the wharf the boats took their positions, the Lewis in front, followed by the Hatteras, Jackson and New-London, all being within a short distance of each other, and directly opposite the town. The Jackson opened fire in the direction of the wharf, at which time a conside
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
Doc. 21.-taking of pass Christian, Miss. A rebel account. Pass Christian, Miss., April 6, 1862. The inhabitants of the Pass were aroused from their slumbers on Friday morning, April fourth, at an early hour, by the report of cannon in the direction of Ship. Island. As soon as daylight appeared it was discovered that the confederate gunboats Pamlico, Oregon and Carondelet were hotly engaged with four of the Federal fleet, and were slowly retiring towards the Pass, under a heavy fire of the enemy. On the arrival here of our gallant little fleet it was ascertained that the Oregon had been struck by a shell in the pilot-house, and that the Carondelet had been hit in the wheelhouse. Neither boat, however, being seriously damaged, they proceeded at once on their way to New-Orleans, the enemy at the same time advancing slowly with the iron gunboats New-London, Jackson and Hatteras, and the steamer Lewis, the latter having on board large numbers of Lincolnite troops. When w
Biloxi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
eart. The enemy disclaimed the intention of doing harm to any one but the confederate soldiery, if they could find them, or of desiring to shell the town. When remonstrated with not having sent a flag of truce ashore, said they had done so at Biloxi, and it was treated with contempt, and that they were informed it would be disregarded by the citizens of the Pass, and that they would not have fired upon the town if the attempt to burn the wharf had not been made. But when I tell you that sev and fifty in all, under the command of Lieut.-Colonel Mellon, who had just returned to camp, in an almost exhausted condition, from Handsboroa, where they had been to join the balance of the Third regiment on their way to meet the Lincolnites at Biloxi — were taken quite by surprise; but, notwithstanding their jaded condition, they opened fire on the enemy and stood their ground manfully under a galling fire, until informed of the vastly superior force they had to contend with, and of the enemy
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
nth regiment of Connecticut volunteers, belonging to the Irish brigade. The officers generally were spirited and fine-looking men, and the soldiers well armed and equipped, and appeared in excellent condition. We were informed by one of the men that the forces under command of Gen. Butler, now upon Ship Island, amount to fourteen thousand, and that fifteen thousand more were expected daily to arrive; that they occasionally get the New-Orleans papers and receive a mail twice a month from New-York. That they are fully posted as regards the affairs of the coast we believe, and that we have had and now have traitors in our midst no one can for a moment doubt. The officers with whom we conversed express the belief, in all apparent sincerity, that the rebellion will be put down and the Southern Confederacy completely wiped out within the next two months. Here ye, hear ye! all you that haven't paid your fare, will, in accordance with the above prediction, please step up to the captai
ilently through the streets, with the Stars and Stripes floating high in the air, in the direction of (as I was told by one of the officers) Tugville. The enemy appeared to be fully informed in regard to the number and location of our troops and the affairs of Pass Christian generally. Prominent individuals were inquired after, and in one instance a young lady's name was familiarly mentioned. The little remnant of our boys --about two hundred and fifty in all, under the command of Lieut.-Colonel Mellon, who had just returned to camp, in an almost exhausted condition, from Handsboroa, where they had been to join the balance of the Third regiment on their way to meet the Lincolnites at Biloxi — were taken quite by surprise; but, notwithstanding their jaded condition, they opened fire on the enemy and stood their ground manfully under a galling fire, until informed of the vastly superior force they had to contend with, and of the enemy's intention to flank and surround them, when the
James B. Christian (search for this): chapter 21
Doc. 21.-taking of pass Christian, Miss. A rebel account. Pass Christian, Miss., April 6, 1862. The inhabitants of the Pass were aroused from their slumbers on Friday morning, April fourth, at an early hour, by the report of cannon in the direction of Ship. Island. As soon as daylight appeared it was discovered that the confederate gunboats Pamlico, Oregon and Carondelet were hotly engaged with four of the Federal fleet, and were slowly retiring towards the Pass, under a heavy fire of the enemy. On the arrival here of our gallant little fleet it was ascertained that the Oregon had been struck by a shell in the pilot-house, and that the Carondelet had been hit in the wheelhouse. Neither boat, however, being seriously damaged, they proceeded at once on their way to New-Orleans, the enemy at the same time advancing slowly with the iron gunboats New-London, Jackson and Hatteras, and the steamer Lewis, the latter having on board large numbers of Lincolnite troops. When
Carondelet (search for this): chapter 21
Doc. 21.-taking of pass Christian, Miss. A rebel account. Pass Christian, Miss., April 6, 1862. The inhabitants of the Pass were aroused from their slumbers on Friday morning, April fourth, at an early hour, by the report of cannon in the direction of Ship. Island. As soon as daylight appeared it was discovered that the confederate gunboats Pamlico, Oregon and Carondelet were hotly engaged with four of the Federal fleet, and were slowly retiring towards the Pass, under a heavy fire of the enemy. On the arrival here of our gallant little fleet it was ascertained that the Oregon had been struck by a shell in the pilot-house, and that the Carondelet had been hit in the wheelhouse. Neither boat, however, being seriously damaged, they proceeded at once on their way to New-Orleans, the enemy at the same time advancing slowly with the iron gunboats New-London, Jackson and Hatteras, and the steamer Lewis, the latter having on board large numbers of Lincolnite troops. When w
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