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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 210
Doc. 197.-the patriotism of Boston, mass., as exhibited August 31, 1862. Boston, September 1. The man does not live who has seen Boston stirred to its very depths as it was yesterday. The winds had been blowing for a week, and there had been an unusual moving of the waters; but yesterday there came a perfect tornado, and such a storm of public feeling as it waked up Boston never knew before. One might imagine as he left the metropolis and journeyed eastward toward the Hub of the Universe, he were going away from the action of the centrifugal forces to where the people never went off in tangents, or got excited. But how deceptive is philosophy! Your heavy, choleric Boston men are all in a blaze, and all the way down, through all the grades, every body is stretching every nerve and wondering why he had been so indifferent up to this time. In the first place, on arriving in the city, after six months absence, not unnaturally I went home and found a brother, not eighte
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 210
ing for God's sake to send on shirts, and bandages, and surgeons. Then reports went around that seventeen thousand of the wounded had been already brought into Washington, and the call seemed no ordinary appeal to human sympathy and patriotism. Gov. Andrew sent notice around to all the churches of the city. Many of them suspendsented yesterday in the uprising of the people, one and all, in hearty and quick response to the relief of the wounded who had fallen in the late battles before Washington. The call had been made, and the congregations separated, each one wending his way diligently to his home, and thinking on every thing which he might contribg nine long freight-cars went out, and Mayor Wightman and several of the city police accompanied the train. Twenty-six surgeons, in answer to the call, went to Washington immediately. Supplies continue to come in to-day from the surrounding towns, and they will be forwarded as they arrive. The excitement has not subsided to-d
d were in circulation, coupled with the calls for lint-bandages and sick supplies. Whether true or not, it was circulated, and had its influence, that after the first call for surgeons and supplies was responded to but slowly, a message came calling for God's sake to send on shirts, and bandages, and surgeons. Then reports went around that seventeen thousand of the wounded had been already brought into Washington, and the call seemed no ordinary appeal to human sympathy and patriotism. Gov. Andrew sent notice around to all the churches of the city. Many of them suspended immediately with a short and fervent prayer; service for the afternoon was abandoned, and the churches were opened for the receival of the contributions for the wounded. All the church-going population of the city thus heard the appeal, and never were human sympathies more promptly or liberally responsive to the call of suffering than yesterday in Boston. The world might halt to look upon so sublime a spectacle
Doc. 197.-the patriotism of Boston, mass., as exhibited August 31, 1862. Boston, September 1. The man does not live who has seen Boston stirred to its very depths as it was yesterday. The winds had been blowing for a week, and there had been an unusual moving of the waters; but yesterday there came a perfect tornado, and such a storm of public feeling as it waked up Boston never knew before. One might imagine as he left the metropolis and journeyed eastward toward the Hub of the Universe, he were going away from the action of the centrifugal forces to where the people never went off in tangents, or got excited. But how deceptive is philosophy! Your heavy, choleric Boston men are all in a blaze, and all the way down, through all the grades, every body is stretching every nerve and wondering why he had been so indifferent up to this time. In the first place, on arriving in the city, after six months absence, not unnaturally I went home and found a brother, not eightee
Wines and liquors of every description and in surprising quantities were sent in, and one merchant contributed a whole wagon-load of packages of Bay rum. Such quantities were sent in that no lack of stimulating materials will occur for a long time. One merchant sent in enough material for three thousand pounds of lint, and I believe that an almost fabulous amount of bandages will have been prepared — enough to wind the whole army in cotton cloth if it should be necessary. Many were engaged in nailing up the boxes as fast as they were packed, which were then put upon the express wagons and taken to the Worcester depot. At five o'clock last evening nine long freight-cars went out, and Mayor Wightman and several of the city police accompanied the train. Twenty-six surgeons, in answer to the call, went to Washington immediately. Supplies continue to come in to-day from the surrounding towns, and they will be forwarded as they arrive. The excitement has not subsided to-day.
Doc. 197.-the patriotism of Boston, mass., as exhibited August 31, 1862. Boston, September 1. The man does not live who has seen Boston stirred to its very depths as it was yesterday. The winds had been blowing for a week, and there had been an unusual moving of the waters; but yesterday there came a perfect tornado, and such a storm of public feeling as it waked up Boston never knew before. One might imagine as he left the metropolis and journeyed eastward toward the Hub of the Universe, he were going away from the action of the centrifugal forces to where the people never went off in tangents, or got excited. But how deceptive is philosophy! Your heavy, choleric Boston men are all in a blaze, and all the way down, through all the grades, every body is stretching every nerve and wondering why he had been so indifferent up to this time. In the first place, on arriving in the city, after six months absence, not unnaturally I went home and found a brother, not eighte
September 1st (search for this): chapter 210
Doc. 197.-the patriotism of Boston, mass., as exhibited August 31, 1862. Boston, September 1. The man does not live who has seen Boston stirred to its very depths as it was yesterday. The winds had been blowing for a week, and there had been an unusual moving of the waters; but yesterday there came a perfect tornado, and such a storm of public feeling as it waked up Boston never knew before. One might imagine as he left the metropolis and journeyed eastward toward the Hub of the Universe, he were going away from the action of the centrifugal forces to where the people never went off in tangents, or got excited. But how deceptive is philosophy! Your heavy, choleric Boston men are all in a blaze, and all the way down, through all the grades, every body is stretching every nerve and wondering why he had been so indifferent up to this time. In the first place, on arriving in the city, after six months absence, not unnaturally I went home and found a brother, not eighte
August 31st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 210
Doc. 197.-the patriotism of Boston, mass., as exhibited August 31, 1862. Boston, September 1. The man does not live who has seen Boston stirred to its very depths as it was yesterday. The winds had been blowing for a week, and there had been an unusual moving of the waters; but yesterday there came a perfect tornado, and such a storm of public feeling as it waked up Boston never knew before. One might imagine as he left the metropolis and journeyed eastward toward the Hub of the Universe, he were going away from the action of the centrifugal forces to where the people never went off in tangents, or got excited. But how deceptive is philosophy! Your heavy, choleric Boston men are all in a blaze, and all the way down, through all the grades, every body is stretching every nerve and wondering why he had been so indifferent up to this time. In the first place, on arriving in the city, after six months absence, not unnaturally I went home and found a brother, not eighte