hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
N. P. Banks 730 0 Browse Search
John Pope 730 6 Browse Search
United States (United States) 728 0 Browse Search
Irwin McDowell 650 0 Browse Search
Doc 510 0 Browse Search
T. C. H. Smith 496 2 Browse Search
Centreville (Virginia, United States) 466 0 Browse Search
F. Sigel 460 4 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 436 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 388 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 101 total hits in 30 results.

1 2 3
Centreville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 213
62. A battle last night, and a victory. Gen. Reno, holding with his division a position three miles this side of Centreville, and a mile to the north of the road, was attacked by part of the forces under Jackson, Ewell, and Hill, about five o'it till the arrival of Kearny. Most of the battle was fought in darkness and storm. The thunder was so heavy that at Centreville, three miles distant, the noise of the cannonade was wholly inaudible, and no battle was suspected to be going on. tunity. Except this battle, there has been no engagement since Saturday. The enemy showed no disposition to attack Centreville in front, but endeavored to win the position by a movement on Fairfax Court-House, which was discovered and foiled by last night's contest. Centreville is abandoned. A battle is possible here, but not expected by the Generals in whose judgment most confidence is placed. Our victory is dearly bought by the death of Gen. Stevens and the capture of General Kearny
Washington (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 213
Doc. 200.-battle of Chantilly, Va. Fairfax Court-House, Tuesday, September 2, 1862. A battle last night, and a victory. Gen. Reno, holding with his division a position three miles this side of Centreville, and a mile to the north of the road, was attacked by part of the forces under Jackson, Ewell, and Hill, about five o'clock in the afternoon. The enemy, attempting a flank movement to put themselves, probably at Fairfax, between General Pope and Washington again, had marched with the utmost celerity across the fields north and east of the Centreville position, which had been occupied in force by Gen. Pope after the reverse of Saturday. Their artillery, therefore, which was obliged to go about by the road, had not come up; but Reno found himself at the beginning of the battle in front of a heavy force of infantry. The engagement, which began with skirmishing at five o'clock, continued for an hour between the force of Reno and the enemy before our reenforcements came. Du
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 213
country. Gen. Kearny brought away from the Peninsula a very high reputation. His services are too recent to have been forgotten. Gen. Stevens's connection with the Port Royal expedition gave him less opportunity than he desired and wished for military services; but he was concerned in all of the operations in which the land forces had a share, and always showed himself the gallant soldier and able General. He has an older reputation in Mexico and Oregon, but I refer especially to his Port Royal career, because I knew him only in South-Carolina, and I wish to add to the public expression of regret at his loss, my own tribute to his gallantry and ability. I have much to say of the events of last week, the condition of this command, of generals and their conduct, and of the immediate prospects before us; but I must defer every thing till another letter, which may be sent I know not when or how. An opening cannonade closes my letter. P. S.--Gen. Kearney was shot, not capture
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 213
nsula a very high reputation. His services are too recent to have been forgotten. Gen. Stevens's connection with the Port Royal expedition gave him less opportunity than he desired and wished for military services; but he was concerned in all of the operations in which the land forces had a share, and always showed himself the gallant soldier and able General. He has an older reputation in Mexico and Oregon, but I refer especially to his Port Royal career, because I knew him only in South-Carolina, and I wish to add to the public expression of regret at his loss, my own tribute to his gallantry and ability. I have much to say of the events of last week, the condition of this command, of generals and their conduct, and of the immediate prospects before us; but I must defer every thing till another letter, which may be sent I know not when or how. An opening cannonade closes my letter. P. S.--Gen. Kearney was shot, not captured. His body has just been brought in. --New-Yor
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 213
The military career of both is well known to the country. Gen. Kearny brought away from the Peninsula a very high reputation. His services are too recent to have been forgotten. Gen. Stevens's connection with the Port Royal expedition gave him less opportunity than he desired and wished for military services; but he was concerned in all of the operations in which the land forces had a share, and always showed himself the gallant soldier and able General. He has an older reputation in Mexico and Oregon, but I refer especially to his Port Royal career, because I knew him only in South-Carolina, and I wish to add to the public expression of regret at his loss, my own tribute to his gallantry and ability. I have much to say of the events of last week, the condition of this command, of generals and their conduct, and of the immediate prospects before us; but I must defer every thing till another letter, which may be sent I know not when or how. An opening cannonade closes my lett
Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 213
Doc. 200.-battle of Chantilly, Va. Fairfax Court-House, Tuesday, September 2, 1862. A battle last night, and a victory. Gen. Reno, holding with his division a position three miles this side of Centreville, and a mile to the north of the road, was attacked by part of the forces under Jackson, Ewell, and Hill, about five o'clock in the afternoon. The enemy, attempting a flank movement to put themselves, probably at Fairfax, between General Pope and Washington again, had marched with the utmost celerity across the fields north and east of the Centreville position, which had been occupied in force by Gen. Pope after the reverse of Saturday. Their artillery, therefore, which was obliged to go about by the road, had not come up; but Reno found himself at the beginning of the battle in front of a heavy force of infantry. The engagement, which began with skirmishing at five o'clock, continued for an hour between the force of Reno and the enemy before our reenforcements came. D
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 213
Doc. 200.-battle of Chantilly, Va. Fairfax Court-House, Tuesday, September 2, 1862. A battle last night, and a victory. Gen. Reno, holding with his division a position three miles this side of Centreville, and a mile to the north of the road, was attacked by part of the forces under Jackson, Ewell, and Hill, about five o'clock in the afternoon. The enemy, attempting a flank movement to put themselves, probably at Fairfax, between General Pope and Washington again, had marched with the utmost celerity across the fields north and east of the Centreville position, which had been occupied in force by Gen. Pope after the reverse of Saturday. Their artillery, therefore, which was obliged to go about by the road, had not come up; but Reno found himself at the beginning of the battle in front of a heavy force of infantry. The engagement, which began with skirmishing at five o'clock, continued for an hour between the force of Reno and the enemy before our reenforcements came. D
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 213
ary career of both is well known to the country. Gen. Kearny brought away from the Peninsula a very high reputation. His services are too recent to have been forgotten. Gen. Stevens's connection with the Port Royal expedition gave him less opportunity than he desired and wished for military services; but he was concerned in all of the operations in which the land forces had a share, and always showed himself the gallant soldier and able General. He has an older reputation in Mexico and Oregon, but I refer especially to his Port Royal career, because I knew him only in South-Carolina, and I wish to add to the public expression of regret at his loss, my own tribute to his gallantry and ability. I have much to say of the events of last week, the condition of this command, of generals and their conduct, and of the immediate prospects before us; but I must defer every thing till another letter, which may be sent I know not when or how. An opening cannonade closes my letter. P
William Robinson (search for this): chapter 213
re drawn up — at first nearly opposite our centre, afterward moving around to our left. Stevens was killed in attempting to advance through the corn-field, and his force driven back. When Birney took command, all the troops of Reno had been withdrawn from the fight, and the line was formed anew on the left. The same formation of the ground extended to the left. Birney drew up his troops at an angle with the line first held by Stevens, so as to front the rebels on the left, and sending Robinson's brigade still further in the same direction, posted Berry's brigade as a reserve, and Graham's battery near it, and himself advanced to the attack with his whole brigade. A heavy fire was kept up for half an hour. From the time when Kearny came on the field a fierce thunder-storm had been raging, and the rain fell incessantly and heavily. It was difficult to keep ammunition dry, but with the advantage of artillery, Birney continued his fire for a considerable time, and inflicted seve
Doc. 200.-battle of Chantilly, Va. Fairfax Court-House, Tuesday, September 2, 1862. A battle last night, and a victory. Gen. Reno, holding with his division a position three miles this side of Centreville, and a mile to the north of the road, was attacked by part of the forces under Jackson, Ewell, and Hill, about five o'clock in the afternoon. The enemy, attempting a flank movement to put themselves, probably at Fairfax, between General Pope and Washington again, had marched with the utmost celerity across the fields north and east of the Centreville position, which had been occupied in force by Gen. Pope after the reverse of Saturday. Their artillery, therefore, which was obliged to go about by the road, had not come up; but Reno found himself at the beginning of the battle in front of a heavy force of infantry. The engagement, which began with skirmishing at five o'clock, continued for an hour between the force of Reno and the enemy before our reenforcements came. D
1 2 3