hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Pope 730 6 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 730 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 728 0 Browse Search
Irwin McDowell 650 0 Browse Search
Doc 510 0 Browse Search
T. C. H. Smith 496 2 Browse Search
Centreville (Virginia, United States) 466 0 Browse Search
F. Sigel 460 4 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 436 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 388 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 103 total hits in 36 results.

1 2 3 4
McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
ry scarce. All the stores were bought out. Coffee rose to one dollar per pound, and storekeepers increased their prices to a par with those of Richmond. The confederates offered to pay double price for every thing. A Union man from whom they wished to purchase forage, told them that their scrip depreciated the paper on which it was printed. All the while the enemy staid here we were continually excited by rumors of the approach of the Federal forces. At one time they were reported at Hanover; at another, to be within fifteen miles, etc. I took pains to learn the Star Spangled Banner on the piano, and played it with vim often during their stay here, greatly to the disgust of the passing soldiers. On Wednesday, the tenth, the army commenced moving at two A. M., Jackson leading off with about three thousand men, and the rest of the army, which had been camped near the Junction, followed, after having blown up the iron bridge of the railroad. A continuous stream of lousy, dirty
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
mselves to liquors and medicines, but principally the spirits, as one of them said he used very little medicine with his men, it cost so much, and he, for his part, preferred whisky or brandy. As the troops filed up Patrick street, by way of Hagerstown, one of them asked, Where does this road lead to? To Hagerstown, he was told. And which way is Baltimore? he said. Fifty-five miles in the opposite direction, he was told. The devil! Do you hear that, Bill? We are marching from instead oHagerstown, he was told. And which way is Baltimore? he said. Fifty-five miles in the opposite direction, he was told. The devil! Do you hear that, Bill? We are marching from instead of to Baltimore, and they then had an excited conversation, and passed on. Twelfth September.--About ten o'clock our pickets were announced approaching, and how every one brightened up is difficult to tell on paper. About six hundred cavalry were concealed in a bend in Patrick street awaiting their arrival. On our advance cavalry guard came. Charge! was the order on both sides, and a short skirmish took place in the streets opposite McPherson's house. I was within fifty yards of it and saw
Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
Doc. 202.-the rebel army in Frederick. Accounts by an army Surgeon. Frederick, Md., September 21, 1862. on Friday night, September fifth, I received a despatch from Col. Miles at Harper's Ferry, that the enemy would shortly be in FredeFrederick, Md., September 21, 1862. on Friday night, September fifth, I received a despatch from Col. Miles at Harper's Ferry, that the enemy would shortly be in Frederick, and advising me to burn my stores. I had every thing prepared, with plenty of turpentine and acids, also, in case of fire failing. There was great commotion in the city at the time, the secessionists being very unruly, and in firing my sheeFrederick, and advising me to burn my stores. I had every thing prepared, with plenty of turpentine and acids, also, in case of fire failing. There was great commotion in the city at the time, the secessionists being very unruly, and in firing my sheets, etc., my hospital steward had to threaten with his pistol several of the crowd who attempted to interfere. We were up that night until three o'clock, when we concluded to retire. Nothing happened until about nine o'clock next morning, when it uildings before he left. However, in regard to this I wrote to General Lee, and he prevented it. Their reception in Frederick was decidedly cool; all the stores shut, no flags flying, and every thing partook of a churchyard appearance. The troo
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 215
pital concealing some articles, a man rode in, and pointing a carbine at the officer of the day, demanded the surrender of the place in the name of the confederate States of America. Not being able to withstand the argument of powder and ball, he concluded to surrender, and the troop of cavalry passed in and took possession of thed as usual, and Jackson attended the Presbyterian and German Reformed Church. At the latter place the minister, Dr. Zacharias, prayed for the President of the United States in a firm voice. While at the hospital this day the United States telegraph operator from the Monocacy Junction was brought in. He had been engaged telegrapUnited States telegraph operator from the Monocacy Junction was brought in. He had been engaged telegraphing on the night of the entrance of the rebels into Maryland on the business of the railroad, had failed to receive notice of the enemy's approach, and was notified of their arrival by the entrance of the confederate General Hill, with one or two aids. The General told him he was a prisoner, and desired him to telegraph to Baltim
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
ce leaving Leesburgh. They were entirely in the dark as to their future movements, expecting, however, to go either to Baltimore or to Pennsylvania. During the day several medical officers called, among others a Dr. Coleman, Medical Director of onfederate General Hill, with one or two aids. The General told him he was a prisoner, and desired him to telegraph to Baltimore to send up a large train of cars, signing his (the operator's) name. He, however, told the General that the wires had , by way of Hagerstown, one of them asked, Where does this road lead to? To Hagerstown, he was told. And which way is Baltimore? he said. Fifty-five miles in the opposite direction, he was told. The devil! Do you hear that, Bill? We are marching from instead of to Baltimore, and they then had an excited conversation, and passed on. Twelfth September.--About ten o'clock our pickets were announced approaching, and how every one brightened up is difficult to tell on paper. About six hu
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
he President of the United States in a firm voice. While at the hospital this day the United States telegraph operator from the Monocacy Junction was brought in. He had been engaged telegraphing on the night of the entrance of the rebels into Maryland on the business of the railroad, had failed to receive notice of the enemy's approach, and was notified of their arrival by the entrance of the confederate General Hill, with one or two aids. The General told him he was a prisoner, and desired rs fed in truly hotel style. When Burnside rode through, the acclamations were universal, but nothing to the reception given McClellan when he entered some time after. Bouquets were thrown; men, women and children rushed to him, he bowing and speaking to all; girls embracing his horse's neck, and kissing the animal, only because they could not reach the General. The reception given to the troops was most inspiring to them, as it had been believed by them that Maryland was not truly loyal.
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
Doc. 202.-the rebel army in Frederick. Accounts by an army Surgeon. Frederick, Md., September 21, 1862. on Friday night, September fifth, I received a despatch from Col. Miles at Harper's Ferry, that the enemy would shortly be in Frederick, and advising me to burn my stores. I had every thing prepared, with plenty of turpentine and acids, also, in case of fire failing. There was great commotion in the city at the time, the secessionists being very unruly, and in firing my sheets, etc., my hospital steward had to threaten with his pistol several of the crowd who attempted to interfere. We were up that night until three o'clock, when we concluded to retire. Nothing happened until about nine o'clock next morning, when it was announced that the enemy was corning. Presently a refugee reported that it was Banks's force that was approaching, and the Unionists were again jubilant; but about half an hour after, a troop of gray-coated cavalry came riding over the hill beyond
Leesburg (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
However, in regard to this I wrote to General Lee, and he prevented it. Their reception in Frederick was decidedly cool; all the stores shut, no flags flying, and every thing partook of a churchyard appearance. The troops had marched from Leesburgh, twenty-three miles distant, since two A. M., crossing at Hauling Ford — a swift march, and more than our men could do. They were the filthiest set of men and officers I ever saw; with clothing that was ragged, and had not been cleaned for weekipline was observed, implicit obedience was maintained; for if a man declined or moved tardily, a blow from sabre or butt of a pistol enforced the order. It was stated by the men that four of the army had been shot for straggling since leaving Leesburgh. They were entirely in the dark as to their future movements, expecting, however, to go either to Baltimore or to Pennsylvania. During the day several medical officers called, among others a Dr. Coleman, Medical Director of Jackson. He was
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
ery thing to be replaced and the offenders to be placed in the guard-house. No straggling was allowed, and although no discipline was observed, implicit obedience was maintained; for if a man declined or moved tardily, a blow from sabre or butt of a pistol enforced the order. It was stated by the men that four of the army had been shot for straggling since leaving Leesburgh. They were entirely in the dark as to their future movements, expecting, however, to go either to Baltimore or to Pennsylvania. During the day several medical officers called, among others a Dr. Coleman, Medical Director of Jackson. He was an Oily Gammon sort of an individual; very anxious about my instruments, quinine, etc.; but as we had either sent away or hidden these things, he got none. In the afternoon I saw brought in, a prisoner, one of the men of Best's battery--Sergeant Driscoll. Although no communication took place between us, I felt very certain that Banks's force was near at hand. From this
ling since leaving Leesburgh. They were entirely in the dark as to their future movements, expecting, however, to go either to Baltimore or to Pennsylvania. During the day several medical officers called, among others a Dr. Coleman, Medical Director of Jackson. He was an Oily Gammon sort of an individual; very anxious about my instruments, quinine, etc.; but as we had either sent away or hidden these things, he got none. In the afternoon I saw brought in, a prisoner, one of the men of Best's battery--Sergeant Driscoll. Although no communication took place between us, I felt very certain that Banks's force was near at hand. From this circumstance all our hopes were much raised, but doomed to disappointment; for, as I afterward learned, he had been sent up here by the captain to purchase a wagon, not anticipating a rebel invasion. Brad. Johnson during the day became drunk, and ordered Brigadier-General Cooper's (United States army) house to be taken for officers' quarters.
1 2 3 4