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Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
Doc. 30.-naval fight at Fort Pillow. Official report of Captain Davis. U. S. Flag-steamer Benton, off Fort Pillow, May 11. Hon. GiFort Pillow, May 11. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: I have the honor to inform the Department that yesterday morning, a little after seven o'clock, tbelieve, fitted as rams — came round the point at the bend above Fort Pillow, and steamed gallantly up the river, fully prepared for a regularters. The enemy finally retreated with haste below the guns of Fort Pillow. I have to call the especial attention of the Department to tCommanding and Fleet Captain. Chicago times report. off Fort Pillow, May 10. At last the monotony is broken. We have had a fightport: report of Captain Montgomery. Flag-Boat Little Rebel, Fort Pillow, May 12. I have the honor to report an engagement with the Federal gunboats at Plum Point Bend, four miles above Fort Pillow, May tenth, 1862. Having previously arranged with my officers the order of
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
were met by greater bravery, skill and metal, and were being badly worsted. Capt. Davis, on the flag-ship Benton, directed every movement of our fleet with the sagacity and style of a veteran in naval warfare. He made no mistakes. Not a boat was moved but with fearful effect upon the enemy. Did the Carondolet put her bows up-stream, it was to let fly her stern guns; did the Cairo turn about, it was that a broadside might give its destruction to the foe. The Mound City, St. Louis, Cincinnati, and the old war-horse Benton were each and all diligent and effective, while the Conestoga (wooden) lay off at a safe distance and made good use of her long-range guns. The cannonading was fearful and its reverberations most grand and terrible. The noise was almost like one continuous report, while the broad river was covered with a dense volume of smoke that for a time completely enveloped both fleets and hid them from view. It was at this time that a report, louder and more distant
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
f the Mound City were severely wounded. The other accidents of the day were slight. I have the honor to be, Your most obedient servant, C. H. Davis, Captain Commanding Mississippi Flotilla, pro tern. Commander Pennock's despatch. Cairo, May 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: News from the fleet is just received. The Mound City was injured on the starboard bow by a ram, and is now on her way to Cairo for repairs. The Cincinnati was injured on her starboaCairo for repairs. The Cincinnati was injured on her starboard bow and sunk in twelve feet of water. She will be raised and sent here for repairs, which will be done with all possible despatch. Commander Stembel is here at the Naval Depot, doing well. Fourth Master Reynolds of the Cincinnati was mortally wounded. Two of the Cincinnati's crew were slightly wounded. There were no other casualties. Commander Stembel fought his ship gallantly. (Signed) A. W. Pennock, Commanding and Fleet Captain. Chicago times report. off Fort Pillow, May
A. H. Kilty (search for this): chapter 30
n; he fired his mortar eleven times at the enemy, reducing the charge and diminishing the elevation. Commander Stembel, in the gunboat Cincinnati, which was the leading vessel in the line on that side of the river, followed immediately by Commander Kilty, in the Mound City, hastened to the support of the mortar-boats, and were repeatedly struck by the enemy's rams, at the same time that they disabled the enemy and drove him away. The two leading vessels of the enemy's line were successively hour, and took place at the closest quarters. The enemy finally retreated with haste below the guns of Fort Pillow. I have to call the especial attention of the Department to the gallantry and good conduct exhibited by Commanders Stembel and Kilty, and Lieut. Commanding S. L. Phelps. I regret to say that Commander Stembel, Fourth Master Reynolds, and one of the seamen of the Cincinnati and one of the Mound City were severely wounded. The other accidents of the day were slight. I have
Benjamin Gregory (search for this): chapter 30
ully prepared for a regular engagement. The vessels of this squadron were lying at the time tied up to the bank of the river--three on the eastern and four on the western side — and (as they were transferred to me by Flag-Officer Foote) ready for action. Most of the vessels were prompt in obeying the signal to follow the motions of the commander--in chief. The leading vessels of the rebel squadron made directly for mortar-boat No. Sixteen, which was for a moment unprotected. Acting-Master Gregory and his crew behaved with great spirit during the action; he fired his mortar eleven times at the enemy, reducing the charge and diminishing the elevation. Commander Stembel, in the gunboat Cincinnati, which was the leading vessel in the line on that side of the river, followed immediately by Commander Kilty, in the Mound City, hastened to the support of the mortar-boats, and were repeatedly struck by the enemy's rams, at the same time that they disabled the enemy and drove him aw
Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 30
Doc. 30.-naval fight at Fort Pillow. Official report of Captain Davis. U. S. Flag-steamer Benton, off Fort Pillow, May 11. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: I have the honor to inform the Department that yesterday morning, a little after seven o'clock, the rebel squadron, consisting of eight iron-clad steamers--four of them, I believe, fitted as rams — came round the point at the bend above Fort Pillow, and steamed gallantly up the river, fully prepared for a regular ely wounded. The other accidents of the day were slight. I have the honor to be, Your most obedient servant, C. H. Davis, Captain Commanding Mississippi Flotilla, pro tern. Commander Pennock's despatch. Cairo, May 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: News from the fleet is just received. The Mound City was injured on the starboard bow by a ram, and is now on her way to Cairo for repairs. The Cincinnati was injured on her starboard bow and sunk in twelve fe
ther flight, then rounded down the river under a broadside fire, and drifted until her tiller-rope that had got out of order, could be readjusted. A few moments after the Bragg struck her blow, the General Sterling Price ran into the same boat aft, a little starboard of her midships, carrying away her rudder, stern-post, and a large piece of her stern. This threw the Carondelet's stern to the Sumter, who struck her running at the utmost speed of his boat. The General Earl Van Dorn, Capt. Fulkerson, running according to orders in the rear of the Price and Sumter, directed his attention to the Mound City, at the time pouring broadsides into the Price and Sumter. As the Van Dorn proceeded, the Mound City sheered, and the Van Dorn struck her a glancing blow, making a hole four feet deep in her starboard forward quarter, evidenced by splinters left on the iron bow of the Van Dorn. As our remaining boats, the General M. Jeff. Thompson, the Colonel Lovell and the General Beauregard,
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 30
ngagement with the Federal gunboats at Plum Point Bend, four miles above Fort Pillow, May tenth, 1862. Having previously arranged with my officers the order of attack, our boats left their moorings at six o'clock A. M., and proceeding up the river, passed round a sharp point, which brought us in full view of the enemy's fleet, numbering eight gunboats and twelve mortar-boats. The Federal boat Carondelet was lying nearest us, guarding a mortar-boat that was shelling the Fort. The General Bragg, Capt. W. H. H. Leonard, dashed at her; the Carondelet, firing her heavy guns, retreated toward a bar, where the depth of water would not be sufficient for our boats to follow. The Bragg continued boldly on under fire of nearly their whole fleet, and struck her a violent blow that stopped her further flight, then rounded down the river under a broadside fire, and drifted until her tiller-rope that had got out of order, could be readjusted. A few moments after the Bragg struck her blow, t
Henry Walke (search for this): chapter 30
mmediately by Commander Kilty, in the Mound City, hastened to the support of the mortar-boats, and were repeatedly struck by the enemy's rams, at the same time that they disabled the enemy and drove him away. The two leading vessels of the enemy's line were successively encountered by this ship. The boilers or steam-chest of one of them was exploded by our shot, and both of them were disabled. They, as well as the first vessel encountered by the Cincinnati, drifted down the river. Commander Walke informs me that he fired a fifty-pound rifle-shot through the boilers of the third of the enemy's gunboats, of the western line, and rendered her for the time being helpless. The action lasted during the better part of an hour, and took place at the closest quarters. The enemy finally retreated with haste below the guns of Fort Pillow. I have to call the especial attention of the Department to the gallantry and good conduct exhibited by Commanders Stembel and Kilty, and Lieut. C
D. W. Foote (search for this): chapter 30
to inform the Department that yesterday morning, a little after seven o'clock, the rebel squadron, consisting of eight iron-clad steamers--four of them, I believe, fitted as rams — came round the point at the bend above Fort Pillow, and steamed gallantly up the river, fully prepared for a regular engagement. The vessels of this squadron were lying at the time tied up to the bank of the river--three on the eastern and four on the western side — and (as they were transferred to me by Flag-Officer Foote) ready for action. Most of the vessels were prompt in obeying the signal to follow the motions of the commander--in chief. The leading vessels of the rebel squadron made directly for mortar-boat No. Sixteen, which was for a moment unprotected. Acting-Master Gregory and his crew behaved with great spirit during the action; he fired his mortar eleven times at the enemy, reducing the charge and diminishing the elevation. Commander Stembel, in the gunboat Cincinnati, which was the
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