hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Pope 730 6 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 730 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 728 0 Browse Search
Irwin McDowell 650 0 Browse Search
Doc 510 0 Browse Search
T. C. H. Smith 496 2 Browse Search
Centreville (Virginia, United States) 466 0 Browse Search
F. Sigel 460 4 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 436 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 388 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 607 total hits in 142 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Warwick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Pennsylvania, had the good fortune to be in advance: and arriving on the battle-ground at a critical time, won a reputation greatly to be envied. Gen. Devens, with his brigade, hurried forward. The Second Rhode Island and Seventh Massachusetts were pushed to support Gen. Peck at a trying period of the fight, and were faithful to their trust. The Tenth Massachusetts was sent to the right to support Gen. Hancock, and did good service. The General Commanding deeply regrets the absence at Warwick of the Thirty-sixth New-York. Graham's brigade came up too late to share in the glory of the fight, but not too late to assure the Division-General that they were ready for any duty which soldiers could be asked to perform. Friends! we have gained the confidence of our country; let us in future battles, as in the last, show that we can face our rebel foes, and whip them, too. By order of Brigadier-General Couch. Francis A. Wale A. A. G. Official — Wm. H. Morris, Captain, A. A. G.
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ome eighty or ninety are reported killed or wounded. Colonel Kemper's regiment suffered terribly, though we have no account of the extent of the casualties. We learn that Gen. Magruder has been for several days quite sick at Westover, on James River. The enemy had not occupied Jamestown at six o'clock on Tuesday evening, but were in large force at Grove wharf and King's mill. They are also understood to be landing forces at West-Point. The Virginia (No. 2) was passed on James Riveren for several days quite sick at Westover, on James River. The enemy had not occupied Jamestown at six o'clock on Tuesday evening, but were in large force at Grove wharf and King's mill. They are also understood to be landing forces at West-Point. The Virginia (No. 2) was passed on James River yesterday, and will be at Richmond to-day. We have conflicting reports of the fight at Barhamsville yesterday, and prefer to wait for an official statement before giving publicity to rumors.
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
The Thirty-eighth New-York regiment, or Scott life-guard, preserved well the high reputation it gained for gallantry at Bull Run, and although in that engagement and in this it has lost fifteen officers and one third of its members, it is still reade to support our flag. I ask that Congress will, by special resolution, authorize this regiment to place upon its flag, Bull Run and Williamsburgh, and the Fortieth New-York or Mozart regiment, Williamsburgh. I trust that the General commanding divight have been expected of him, (when, as Colonel of the Fourth regiment of Maine volunteers, he nearly saved the day at Bull Run,) and also a genius for war and a pertinacity in the fight that proved him fit for high command — for he was most severeot and gun for gun. The army of the Potomac, long drilled, long in waiting, eager to avenge the slaughter and repulse at Bull Run and Ball's Bluff, knew no such word as fail. When the firing was the most terrific, and the anxiety the most intense,
New Kent (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ed we have the names of the following officers: Killed-Colonel Ward, of the Fourth Florida regiment; Major William H. Palmer, of the First Virginia regiment, (and son of Mr. Wm. Palmer, of this city,) and Capt. Jack Humphreys, of the Seventeenth Virginia regiment. Wounded--Col. Corse, of the Seventeenth Virginia regiment; Col. Kemper, of the Seventh Virginia regiment, and Col. Garland, of Lynchburgh, severely. Another heavy battle took place yesterday near Barhamsville, in the county of New-Kent, but with what result was not known, as the courier who brought the intelligence to this city left at twelve o'clock. The enemy landed their forces from gunboats (twenty-four in number) at or near West-Point. The number engaged on either side is not known, but that of the enemy was supposed to be very large. A general engagement of the two armies is expected. The loss on both sides in the fight of yesterday was very heavy, ours believed to be not less than one thousand up to twelve o'c
Barhamsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Kearney's Division. Letter from General Kearney. headquarters Third division Heintzelman's corps, camp Berry, Barhamsville, May 10, 1862. To His Excellency Gov. Morgan: sir: It is with great satisfaction that I have the honor of bringing lman's Corps. Compliment to the Maine troops. headquarters Third division Heintzelman's corps, camp Berry, Barhamsville, Va., May 10. To His Excellency, Israel Washburn, Jr., Governor of Maine: sir: As Commanding General of this divisioneventh Virginia regiment, and Col. Garland, of Lynchburgh, severely. Another heavy battle took place yesterday near Barhamsville, in the county of New-Kent, but with what result was not known, as the courier who brought the intelligence to this cint. The Virginia (No. 2) was passed on James River yesterday, and will be at Richmond to-day. We have conflicting reports of the fight at Barhamsville yesterday, and prefer to wait for an official statement before giving publicity to rumors.
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
erior officer charged with the advance on the Yorktown road, for authority to throw my command on tohalf a mile, and the same was the case on the Yorktown road. Between the edge of the felled timber nce as skirmishers until they had reached the Yorktown road, and when that was gained to have word s the skirmishers to the right had reached the Yorktown road, where word was sent to Col. Blaisdell tk over the note, and returned with it, by the Yorktown road, after an absence of twenty minutes. through Williamsburgh, on their retreat from Yorktown, and were recalled to strengthen the rebel fos and strength of the rebel fortifications at Yorktown, the Northern public could hardly have expect were barren until three or four miles beyond Yorktown, where there were signs of cultivation and mad give any good reason for the abandonment of Yorktown, which they concurred in pronouncing the best the planting of torpedoes in the road, as at Yorktown, they proceeded across the field, passing an [9 more...]
Cologne (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 7
r more than compensated for his suffering. By the order of the General he was at once removed to a private house near at hand, and attended by a skilful surgeon. The appearance of the college hospital was not at all creditable to its rebel keepers. The floors, the stairs, the walls, and even the windows, were covered with filth, and we had only to open the pantries, or stroll in the yards, to detect as many distinct and well-defined stenches as Coleridge counted in the dirty streets of Cologne. Medical stores and implements, fragments of furniture and clothing, broken crockery, cooking utensils, and kindred rubbish, was strewn all over the building, while the grounds, heretofore so picturesque and well-protected, which for their historic associations, if for nothing more, should have been jealously guarded, were a complete waste. The fences prostrate, the stone gate-posts overturned, the sod and trees destroyed, and even the marble statue of Baron de Botetourt disfigured and be
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the Maine troops. headquarters Third division Heintzelman's corps, camp Berry, Barhamsville, Va., May 10. To His Excellency, Israel Washburn, Jr., Governor of Maine: sir: As Commanding General of this division, of which two of the Generals commanding brigades, (Gen. Jameson and Gen. Berry,) as well as two regiments, the Thir to enclose the report of Gen. D. B. Birney, who commanded the noble brigade, of which these two regiments form a part. Gen. Birney commands two New-York and two Maine regiments. It is peculiarly appropriate, after having rendered justice to the regiments and Colonels, to bring Gens. Jameson and Berry to the especial attention Gen. Berry, charged with the left wing of our line of battle, evinced a courage that might have been expected of him, (when, as Colonel of the Fourth regiment of Maine volunteers, he nearly saved the day at Bull Run,) and also a genius for war and a pertinacity in the fight that proved him fit for high command — for he was most s
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
elieve the siege-gun found in Fort Page the only one of that character used by the enemy during the day. Where Hooker had fought the signs of slaughter were abundant. Though many of the bodies had been buried, there were enough yet exposed to show the terrible effect of his shot. Bramhall's horses were thickly scattered over the ground, a certificate to his precarious position. That he managed to escape with his life is a wonder of the day. Here, too, we saw where Massachusetts and New-Hampshire men and the Sickles brigade had met the enemy, and where the Jerseymen, under the younger Patterson, had proven worthy their fathers of Monmouth and Trenton. The acres of felled and tangled trees had greatly impeded our progress, and held many of our brave fellows under the enemy's galling fire. This was by far the best defended portion of his lines, and would probably have been held much longer but for Hancock's coup de maitre. All over the battle-field our inquisitive troops were
Chambersburg (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
abundant. Though many of the bodies had been buried, there were enough yet exposed to show the terrible effect of his shot. Bramhall's horses were thickly scattered over the ground, a certificate to his precarious position. That he managed to escape with his life is a wonder of the day. Here, too, we saw where Massachusetts and New-Hampshire men and the Sickles brigade had met the enemy, and where the Jerseymen, under the younger Patterson, had proven worthy their fathers of Monmouth and Trenton. The acres of felled and tangled trees had greatly impeded our progress, and held many of our brave fellows under the enemy's galling fire. This was by far the best defended portion of his lines, and would probably have been held much longer but for Hancock's coup de maitre. All over the battle-field our inquisitive troops were exploring the enemy's defences — now examining the forts, now measuring the rifle-pits, and anon surveying the stockades and parallels. Many and original were
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...