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Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 75
red and ready to proceed with us up the river to-morrow. A full report will be made as early as possible. Very respectfully, G. N. Fitch, Colonel commanding Forty-sixth Indiana Volunteers. Account by a participant. St. Charles, White River, Arkansas, Saturday, June 21, 1862. my dear mother: I have not had time to write to you before about the battle that we had up here last Tuesday, of which you have doubtless heard by this time. When I went over the battle-field of Pittsburgh Landing, I thought I had seen as horrible a sight as it was possible to see, but the horrors of last Tuesday morning surpassed every thing. I had better give you a full account of the expedition up this river since it left Memphis. We left Memphis last Friday at five A. M., the Mound City, Capt. A. H. Kilty, commanding the expedition, the St. Louis, Capt. W. McGunnegle, and the Lexington, Capt. James W. Shirk, with a coal-barge in tow. At three P. M. came in sight of Helena, and discover
Fort St. Charles (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 75
rt side just above gun No. One, and killing two captains of guns, passed clear through the steam-drum and lodged in the forward officers' mess-room. In looking at that poor mess I thought that perhaps it was foreordained, but may God preserve me from such a fate. Your affectionate son, feed. Wise. Missouri Democrat account. Memphis, June 19, 1862. The gunboat Conestoga and transport Jacob Musselman have just arrived from White River, and bring the news of the capture of Fort St. Charles, on that river, by the gunboats of the expedition which left here on Friday last. The fleet consisted of the gunboats Mound City, (flagship,) St. Louis, Conestoga and Lexington, and the transports New National, White Cloud and Jacob Musselman, having on board the Forty-sixth Indiana regiment, in command of Col. G. N. Fitch. On Saturday last the fleet reached the mouth of White River, and on Monday, the eighteenth, began to ascend the stream. On Tuesday morning, at about seven o'clo
St. Charles, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 75
gs information of the capture of two batteries at St. Charles, eighty miles from the mouth; the first of which t laden with commissary stores. The victory at St. Charles, which has probably given us the command of Whitehe profession. In the attack on the batteries at St. Charles he occupied the leading place, and received his wng information of the capture of two batteries at St. Charles, and the removal of obstructions which have probaf the navy is most gratifying; but the victory of St. Charles is mingled with regret for the lamented dead, andween these great barbarities of a savage enemy at St. Charles, and the humane efforts of yourself and your commCairo. Official report of Colonel Fitch. St. Charles, White River, Ark., June 17. To Hon. E. M. Stantona Volunteers. Account by a participant. St. Charles, White River, Arkansas, Saturday, June 21, 1862. formation that the enemy had erected a battery at St. Charles, some four miles above. Next morning at six we a
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 75
s accordingly ceased firing, and after making considerable of a detour, the Forty-sixth attacked the batteries in the rear, delivering their fire as they came up, charging over the guns and killing the gunners at their posts. The rebels fought stubbornly, asking no quarter, and receiving none from the men of the Forty-sixth, who were enraged at the dastardly firing upon the helpless men in the river; only two of those who were in the battery were taken prisoners, the rest were killed. The Indiana troops then came over the brow of the ridge and down into the wooded bottom-land next the river in pursuit of those who had been firing on the Mound City's crew, the rebels retreating rapidly up the bank of the river, the Forty-sixth firing on them as they fled, killing the greater portion of them. In the flight, Capt. Fry, their commander, was wounded by a ball in the back, was captured, and is now a prisoner on board the Conestoga. The rebel loss in killed is not known, but must have in
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 75
bring the captured steamer Clara Dolsen up to Memphis. The damage to the Mound City is but slight, and can be repaired in half a day. A new crew will be sent down immediately to man her, and she will continue with the expedition, which will proceed further up White River. It was thought that the sunken boats could soon be sufficiently removed to admit the passage of the fleet, and it is not probable that they will meet with any further opposition, as it was conceded that there were no other works further up the stream, and that the river was virtually in our possession. But before many days I hope to send you even more important news; rumors portentous of disaster to the rebels reach us from Vicksburgh; and perhaps even in my next letter I may be able to say that the flag hallowed by the blood of those who first raised it in the Revolution of ‘76, and of those who sustained it in ‘61-2, floats over the last rebel battery that frowned over the Mississippi yellow flood. W. L.
White River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 75
ng G. W. Blodgett, arrived here to-day from White River. She brings information of the capture o There is now but one gunboat remaining in White River, the Pontchartrain, mounting three or five discovered. The Conestoga will return to White River tonight with reinforcements, accompanied by which has probably given us the command of White River, and secured our communication with Gen. Cuwhich have probably given us the command of White River, has been received. The intelligence of the to anchor at ten A. M., some ten miles up White River by a cut-off leading into Arkansas River. we then all got under way and proceeded up White River. We anchored that night some fifty miles uport Jacob Musselman have just arrived from White River, and bring the news of the capture of Fort aturday last the fleet reached the mouth of White River, and on Monday, the eighteenth, began to ase expedition, which will proceed further up White River. It was thought that the sunken boats co
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 75
scue the wounded and disabled at Memphis is honorable to the gallant men of the flotilla, and will be gratefully remembered. The nation honoring the memory and sufferings of its heroes, sympathizes with the wounded survivors and the bereaved families of the gallant dead. Its noblest tributes are due to those who bleed for their country and die in its cause. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Gideon Welles. To Flag-Officer Charles H. Davis, Commanding Western Flotilla, Memphis via Cairo. Official report of Colonel Fitch. St. Charles, White River, Ark., June 17. To Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: On arriving eight miles below here last evening, we ascertained that the enemy had two batteries here, supported by a force — number unknown — of infantry. A combined attack was made at seven o'clock A. M. to-day. The regiment under my command (Forty-sixth Indiana) landed two and a half miles below the battery, and skirmishers were thrown out, who drove in the
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 75
elena, fired several shots at her, but they all fell short. We continued the chase until about nine in the evening, when, having for some time lost sight of the Dolsen entirely, and knowing her to be one of the fastest boats on the river, we gave up the chase and came to anchor. Next morning, the iron-boats having caught up to us in the mean time, we took the barge in tow and started down the river and came to anchor at ten A. M., some ten miles up White River by a cut-off leading into Arkansas River. The tug Spiteful then went up the river on a reconnoissance and returned in the afternoon, followed by the Clara Dolsen, which she had captured some twenty miles up the river. She is a magnificent boat and worth about sixty thousand dollars. We lay there all that night and the next day and night, tortured dreadfully by musquitoes. On Sunday Captain Kilty put the Dolsen in charge of the Third Master of the Lexington, James Fitzpatrick, and sent her up to Memphis. Next morning, (Mon
Conestoga (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 75
ead to reconnoitre. She returned in about two hours with the information that the enemy had erected a battery at St. Charles, some four miles above. Next morning at six we all got under way, the Mound City leading the St. Louis, Lexington and Conestoga, and the transports White Cloud and New National, with some six hundred men under Col. Fitch. At eight o'clock we called to quarters and commenced firing our No. One Parrott gun, and, the transports disembarked their troops, who marched out have just arrived from White River, and bring the news of the capture of Fort St. Charles, on that river, by the gunboats of the expedition which left here on Friday last. The fleet consisted of the gunboats Mound City, (flagship,) St. Louis, Conestoga and Lexington, and the transports New National, White Cloud and Jacob Musselman, having on board the Forty-sixth Indiana regiment, in command of Col. G. N. Fitch. On Saturday last the fleet reached the mouth of White River, and on Monday, th
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 75
Doc. 75.-battle on White River, Ark. Fought June 17, 1862. Commander Davis's reports. United States flag steamer Benton, Memphis, June 19, 1862. sir: The Conestoga, Lieut. Commanding G. W. Blodgett, arrived here to-day from White River. She brings information of the capture of two batteries at St. Charles, eighty miles from the mouth; the first of which mounted four Parrott guns, and the second three forty-two-pounder rifled guns. Three guns, it is understood, were taken frod their willingness to die when they were told that the victory was ours. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, C. H. Davis, Flag-Officer Commanding Western Flotilla. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. United States flag steamer Benton, Memphis, June 20. sir: The number of wounded men on board of the hospital boat Red Rover, is forty-one. The account given me yesterday was incorrect. I shall still wait for further knowledge before presenting a final
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