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Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
the Thirty-third Illinois regiment, was ordered by General Steele to open the road on the opposite side of the Cache, make a reconnoissance in front down to the Clarendon road, along which the army were to march, and also to scour the woods thoroughly. Colonel Hovey detailed for this enterprise the following force: Colonel Harrise enemy unknown. We had driven the enemy three miles. After halting there two hours, and no enemy making his appearance, Lieutenant-Colonel Wood returned to the Clarendon road and went to the Bayou du View to carry out his original intention. General Benton came up with his brigade and took command. In camp it was supposed that everything on the march in good order, we heard what we supposed was the distant report of howitzers. The deception arose from the dropping of a bucket into a well on a neighboring plantation. We encamped for the night on the side toward Clarendon. Major Bowen dashed down eight miles before dark and reported the road clear.
Bayou Cache (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
llant conduct while exposed to the enemy's fire; also, to all the officers and men engaged. After a short rest, we proceeded, with seven additional companies of infantry, under the command of Lieut.-Col. Wood of the Eleventh Wisconsin regiment, to the bridge across Bayou de View, as before mentioned. I have the honor to be Your obedient servant, William F. Wood, Lieut-Col. First Regiment Indiana Cavalry. St. Louis Democrat account. The battle of the seventh of July, near Bayou Cache, won against tremendous odds, resulted in the death of over one hundred and ten rebels and the utter demoralization of six Texan regiments, who have not ventured to molest us since. The army under General Curtis was encamped at the junction of the Bayou Cache and Cache River, where our progress was delayed by a blockade of fallen timber. A road had been cut through this blockade on the evening of the sixth, and early next morning Colonel Hovey, of the Thirty-third Illinois regiment, was
Des Arc (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
De View, he had proceeded but a short distance when I overtook and turned him back, with instructions to hasten down the Des Arc road, and, if possible, rescue a prisoner just captured. He marched rapidly for half a mile, and fell into an ambush. proved extremely opportune. Colonel Hovey was posted about one hundred and fifty yards from Colonel Hill's house on the Des Arc road, and the army were not in view. Coming up at full speed, having heard the firing, the First Indiana were welcomed fight took place on another road, and consequently General Benton's orders were to make a rapid reconnoissance down the Des Arc road. Bowen's howitzers were pushed forward down one road after the enemy. A shot was fired on the rebels and three meprevent pursuit from our cavalry. It has been subsequently ascertained that six thousand Texans, under Rust, crossed at Des Arc on Sunday, the sixth, for the purpose of fighting us near the blockade, and annoy and obstruct our advance in every poss
White River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
fifty men. Colonel Hovey started about six A. M., with company D, of the Eleventh Wisconsin, ahead. Skirmishers were thrown out, and in this way they proceeded to the Hill plantation, at the forks of the road, four miles distant from camp. On the way some pickets were driven in. The main road here leads to Cotton Plant and Clarendon. The road to the left is a neighborhood road, while that turning to the side leads across the Cache, four miles distant, and thence to the Des Are, on the White River. Detachments were sent forward on each of these roads to reconnoitre. Colonel Harris, with three companies of the Eleventh Wisconsin, and Captain Potter, with the small rifle piece, proceeded rapidly down the Des Are road, having no cavalry. They passed a cornfield on the left, entered an open wood, and reaching a turn in the road, at the same time rising up in elevation, they fell in with two Texan regiments of cavalry, with a regiment of conscript infantry drawn up on their right, re
Cotton Plant, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
, Captain Lawton; and company A, Captain Potter, who took charge, and one small rifled gun belonging to the First Indiana cavalry. The whole force numbered not over three hundred and fifty men. Colonel Hovey started about six A. M., with company D, of the Eleventh Wisconsin, ahead. Skirmishers were thrown out, and in this way they proceeded to the Hill plantation, at the forks of the road, four miles distant from camp. On the way some pickets were driven in. The main road here leads to Cotton Plant and Clarendon. The road to the left is a neighborhood road, while that turning to the side leads across the Cache, four miles distant, and thence to the Des Are, on the White River. Detachments were sent forward on each of these roads to reconnoitre. Colonel Harris, with three companies of the Eleventh Wisconsin, and Captain Potter, with the small rifle piece, proceeded rapidly down the Des Are road, having no cavalry. They passed a cornfield on the left, entered an open wood, and rea
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
sten down the Des Arc road, and, if possible, rescue a prisoner just captured. He marched rapidly for half a mile, and fell into an ambush. The woods swarmed with rebels, and the firing was terrific. I have since learned that over two thousand Texas troops were here drawn up in line of battle. Capt. Miller led our advance, and was immediately followed by First Lieut. Chesebro, both of whose companies were deployed as skirmishers. These companies began the fight. The little cannon was plan I a report of the prisoners taken. A large number of horses were captured, and many left dead on the field. Sixty-six were counted within an area of half a mile square. Our loss was seven killed, and fifty-seven wounded. The rebel force--Texas troops — engaged in the fight could not have been far from two thousand (2000) men, and was supported by a still larger reserve force, all under the command of General Rust. The loyal force was less than four hundred, (400,) increased just at
Cache River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
within a mile of the place known as Round Hill, we met a messenger from Col. Hovey, who said that the Colonel had been attacked by a large force and had three companies killed. We afterward met a squad of infantry hurrying toward our camp on Cache River, who informed us that they had been badly used up; Col. Hovey, Thirty-third Illinois volunteers, with about four hundred infantry and one gun under the command of Lieut. Denneman, First regiment Indiana cavalry, had been fighting with the rebe. Four kegs of powder were found concealed. The houses along the road were filled with rebel wounded, and the porches and door-steps were besmeared with blood from those which they carried away. They abandoned their camp and fled across the Cache River, destroying a bridge they had constructed with boats. The bank on the opposite side was also cut out very steep so as to prevent pursuit from our cavalry. It has been subsequently ascertained that six thousand Texans, under Rust, crossed at
Helena, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
with a force of infantry, and the First Indiana cavalry, to pursue and capture them. He proceeded to Bayou De View, shelled the rebels from their camp, and prevented the burning of the bridge, on which fagots had already been piled. By this time it was dark, and the forces rested. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, C. E. Hovey, Colonel Commanding. To Captain J. W. Paddock, Assistant Adjutant-General. Report of Lieut.-Colonel wood. headquarters First Indiana cavalry, Helena, Ark., July 15, 1862. Col. Conrad Baker, Commanding Fourth Brigade: sir: In obedience to your order, on the seventh inst., I proceeded with the Second battalion First regiment Indiana cavalry, and two steel rifled guns to the bridge across Bayou de View, which we fortunately succeeded in saving from destruction, the rebels having built a fire at the north end, ready to burn it. This we prevented by cautiously approaching their pickets, who fired upon us and fled. We returned their fire and
Bayou De View (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
on, and fired on them. Passing the forks of the road at this place towards Bayou De View, he had proceeded but a short distance when I overtook and turned him back, were being collected and cared for, another body of rebels appeared on the Bayou De View road and drove in our pickets. I immediately sent Lieut.-Col. Wood, of theand the First Indiana cavalry, to pursue and capture them. He proceeded to Bayou De View, shelled the rebels from their camp, and prevented the burning of the bridgst regiment Indiana cavalry, and two steel rifled guns to the bridge across Bayou de View, which we fortunately succeeded in saving from destruction, the rebels havi with several battalions of conscripts at Round Hill, eight miles north of Bayou de View. When within a mile of the place known as Round Hill, we met a messenger ff Lieut.-Col. Wood of the Eleventh Wisconsin regiment, to the bridge across Bayou de View, as before mentioned. I have the honor to be Your obedient servant, W
Round Hill, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
out your order we incidentally engaged a large force of the enemy composed of the Twelfth and Fourteenth Texas cavalry, with several battalions of conscripts at Round Hill, eight miles north of Bayou de View. When within a mile of the place known as Round Hill, we met a messenger from Col. Hovey, who said that the Colonel had beRound Hill, we met a messenger from Col. Hovey, who said that the Colonel had been attacked by a large force and had three companies killed. We afterward met a squad of infantry hurrying toward our camp on Cache River, who informed us that they had been badly used up; Col. Hovey, Thirty-third Illinois volunteers, with about four hundred infantry and one gun under the command of Lieut. Denneman, First regimenbeen fighting with the rebels and had retreated before a very large force, having a great number of men killed and wounded. Increasing our speed, we arrived at Round Hill, and the first squad of infantry we saw ran from us, supposing us to be the enemy. The principal part of the infantry were standing in groups in the edge of th
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