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river (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 88
ton battalion, wounded in the leg, in an endeavor to bring off whom, it was said, Private Bresnan, Irish volunteers, was mortally wounded. Gallantry and discretion of Lieut.-Col. Capers marked. Capt. Ryan, Irish volunteers, Charleston battalion, distinguished himself by his gallant courage. Lieut. J. Ward Hopkins, Sumter Guard, Charleston battalion, wounded in shoulder. Our companies first engaged, were reenforced during the action by several others. All fell back across the causeway to River's merely, and joined the main body of our troops. Enemy ascertained from prisoners to be in strong force at Legare's, under command of Brig.-Gen. Stevens. Heavy bombardment all day by gunboats, of our troops in line of battle, to resist enemy's advance from Legare's; our troops necessarily much exposed. A section of Capt. William C. Preston's battery light artillery, under Capt. Preston and Lieut. Julius Rhett, was carried with great promptness and dash into position, and worked with fier
Secessionville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 88
a few shell thrown from the Stono, toward Secessionville, fell near the camp of Twenty-fourth regimre's Point, that of Capt. Warley, close to Secessionville, and Secessionville itself. This place beSecessionville itself. This place being then occupied by the Eutaw battalion, Lieut.-Col. Charles H. Simonton commanding; the Charlestonnd of Capt.----Warley, in the direction of Secessionville, rendered the enemy's advance across the cnes. Gunboats from creek in front shelled Secessionville. Design of enemy to occupy apparent. Enemand. Heavy firing of shot and shell upon Secessionville, from enemy's gunboats, and from a batteryly all day. One man killed in his tent, at Secessionville, by a shell. June 15.--Similar firing upon Secessionville. Colonel Lamar replies more deliberately. Firing very slow towards night. Two the enemy at daylight on the earthwork at Secessionville. Brig.-Gen. Stevens in command of assault.-Col. McEnery, reenforced the garrison at Secessionville during the fight, and rushing gallantly in
Eutaw (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 88
ost silenced by this latter fire. A gun, worked by Lieut.-Col. Ellison Capers,, in a little battery-across the creek, at Clarke's, somewhat flanking the enemy's advance, did effective service. By order of Col. Johnson Hagood, in command of advanced troops, the Louisiana battalion, Lieut.-Col. McEnery, reenforced the garrison at Secessionville during the fight, and rushing gallantly into the fire with the cry of Remember Butler, soon drove the enemy from his flanking position at Hill's. The Eutaw battalion on the right engaged the enemy for a short time in the woods, to the rear of Hill's house, when he fell back, together with the troops engaged by the Louisiana battalion and our other troops from across the creek. Then the entire force of the enemy, between five and six thousand strong, slowly and sullenly retired from the attack to their positions on the Stono and within their late line of pickets, burning Rivers's house on their retreat. Enemy's loss probably eight hundred men;
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 88
Doc. 84.-a rebel soldier's Diary of the enemy's approach to and withdrawal from before Charleston, S. C., May, June and July, 1862. May 17.--Enemy sounding Stono Channel in barges. One fired on from Goat Island by riflemen, and driven off. May 19.--Several of the enemy's gunboats attempted to enter Stono Inlet; one ran aground and all put back. May 20.--Three gunboats crossed the Bar and entered the Stono River about three o'clock A. M. One ran up and anchored a little below Batterant batteries of Col. T. G. Lamar and of Capt.----Warley, in the direction of Secessionville, rendered the enemy's advance across the causeway, though repeatedly threatened, too perilous for him to attempt. Brig.-Gen. H. W. Mercer arrived from Charleston in the afternoon. Col. Johnson Hagood, First regiment South-Carolina volunteers, previously detained in the city by his duties as Provost-Marshal, joined his regiment during the day. Casualties light. Brig.-Gen. Gist and aids, covered with sa
Folly River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 88
buildings. Our men on the qui vive. On appearance of a gunboat off mouth of Folly River, carronade on marsh battery, near Folly River, thrown overboard by those in Folly River, thrown overboard by those in charge. Coles's and Battery Islands shelled by the enemy. May 21.--Six of our pickets, of Capt. Jones's company, Twenty-fourth regiment South Carolina volunteers, who were riding out. June 1--(Sunday.)--A gunboat came some distance up Folly River, but soon retired. Reconnoitring apparently. June 2.--A gunboat came up Folly River this morning, on the flood, about nine A. M., shelled the battery of Capt. Chichester at Legare's Point, that of Capt. Warley, close to Secessionville, ace on the field, supported by a cross-fire from gunboats in the Stono and in Folly River. Enemy engaged said to have been Twenty-eighth Massachusetts and One Hundreng the flank movement on our right. Enemy's fire from gunboats in Stono and Folly Rivers, from his stationary battery at Legare's Point, from his light artillery and
Stono Inlet (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 88
withdrawal from before Charleston, S. C., May, June and July, 1862. May 17.--Enemy sounding Stono Channel in barges. One fired on from Goat Island by riflemen, and driven off. May 19.--Several of the enemy's gunboats attempted to enter Stono Inlet; one ran aground and all put back. May 20.--Three gunboats crossed the Bar and entered the Stono River about three o'clock A. M. One ran up and anchored a little below Battery Island, commanding the old (river) route from Coles's Island — tind the General's headquarters, and exploded. After firing for about an hour, the enemy withdrew. No damage, up to this time, done by the enemy's firing, except to horses. Evening.--More than twenty vessels in sight off Charleston Bar and Stono Inlet, and in Stono River. Enemy reported as being on James Island, at the point nearest Battery Island, and as having driven in our pickets. Capt. Carlos Tracy, volunteer aid to Gen. Gist, and Lieut. Winter, Wassamassaw cavalry, fired on while re
Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 88
ted to enter Stono Inlet; one ran aground and all put back. May 20.--Three gunboats crossed the Bar and entered the Stono River about three o'clock A. M. One ran up and anchored a little below Battery Island, commanding the old (river) route from's firing, except to horses. Evening.--More than twenty vessels in sight off Charleston Bar and Stono Inlet, and in Stono River. Enemy reported as being on James Island, at the point nearest Battery Island, and as having driven in our pickets. and Col. Simonton showed promptitude and skill, repulsing the flank movement on our right. Enemy's fire from gunboats in Stono and Folly Rivers, from his stationary battery at Legare's Point, from his light artillery and from his small-arms, terribom Grimball's, now ascertained to be all withdrawn from that place. Transports, for several days past, seen going out of Stono. Gunboats in the river off Grimball's. July 7.--Major William Duncan, First regiment South--Carolina volunteers, narr
Snake Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 88
bout three o'clock A. M. One ran up and anchored a little below Battery Island, commanding the old (river) route from Coles's Island — the enemy thinking, probably, to cut off our troops on Coles's Island. Lieut.-Col. Ellison Capers, Twenty-fourth reColes's Island. Lieut.-Col. Ellison Capers, Twenty-fourth regiment South-Carolina volunteers, commanding on Coles's Island, withdrew his force, (two companies,) under standing orders, to James Island, by the new (back) and scarcely completed route over Dixon's Island. Capt. L. Buist, Palmetto Guard, commandinColes's Island, withdrew his force, (two companies,) under standing orders, to James Island, by the new (back) and scarcely completed route over Dixon's Island. Capt. L. Buist, Palmetto Guard, commanding on Battery Island, withdrew his force, (two companies,) under similar orders, also to James Island. By like orders, the buildings on Coles's and on Battery Islands were fired by our men before retiring. Volumes of smoke from the burning buildings a gunboat off mouth of Folly River, carronade on marsh battery, near Folly River, thrown overboard by those in charge. Coles's and Battery Islands shelled by the enemy. May 21.--Six of our pickets, of Capt. Jones's company, Twenty-fourth regime
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 88
commanding on Coles's Island, withdrew his force, (two companies,) under standing orders, to James Island, by the new (back) and scarcely completed route over Dixon's Island. Capt. L. Buist, Palmettomanding on Battery Island, withdrew his force, (two companies,) under similar orders, also to James Island. By like orders, the buildings on Coles's and on Battery Islands were fired by our men beformagazine on the approach of a gunboat up the Stono. Enemy saw them and landed. Legare's, on James Island, shelled this day by a gunboat slowly going up the Stono. May 25.--Gunboats to this time h in sight off Charleston Bar and Stono Inlet, and in Stono River. Enemy reported as being on James Island, at the point nearest Battery Island, and as having driven in our pickets. Capt. Carlos Tracprobably from gunboats. Enemy withdrawn from Legare's. July 8.--Enemy known to have altogether abandoned James Island, and our city to be safe for the present.--Charleston Mercury, September 22.
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 88
heir arms. The night tempestuous. June 4.--Main body of our troops driven within the lines. Gunboats from creek in front shelled Secessionville. Design of enemy to occupy apparent. Enemy said to be advancing this evening. Untrue. June 5.--Enemy said to be advancing this evening. Our troops marched to the front. Every thing quiet by sundown. No fight. June 6.--Brig.-Gen. W. D. Smith arrived on the Island and assumed command, Gen. Mercer having been ordered to take command at Savannah. Picket-guard this evening, under Col. C. H. Stevens, Twenty-fourth regiment South-Carolina volunteers, skirmished with the enemy at the Presbyterian church. Enemy left one dead on the ground. Indications that he suffered further. A section of Preston's battery did some firing. No loss on our side. A prisoner brought into camp. June 7.--Alarm in evening. Troops to the front. Every thing soon quiet. Enemy moving about Grimball's, on the Stono. June 8.--Enemy evidently in force
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