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Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 96
r active duty in the field. It was now occupied by a regiment or two, with one battery, and some odds and ends of cavalry, the whole under the command of Ruggles. Upon the arrival of Gen. Breckinridge, he assumed chief command, and the troops were separated into two divisions. To Gen. Clarke were assigned Gen. Ben. Hardin Helm's brigade, consisting of the Fourth and Fifth Kentucky, Fourth Alabama battalions and Thirty-first Mississippi regiment, Col. Stratham's brigade of Tennessee and Mississippi troops, and Cobb's Kentucky and Hudson's Mississippi batteries. To Gen. Ruggles were given his old force, the Fourth Louisiana, Col. Allen; Louisiana battalion, Col. Boyd; the Partisan Rangers, and Semmes' battery, together with Preston's brigade, commanded by Colonel A. P. Thompson, of the Third Kentucky, composed of the Third, Sixth and Seventh Kentucky, and Twenty-sixth Alabama regiments. These troops were mostly war-worn veterans, but their long marches and the arduous picket-duty a
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 96
s. Unfortunately he is confined to his bed with typhoid fever, at the residence of a friend, near Clinton, Miss. Colonel Thompson, however, as Acting Brigadier, proved a gallant and intrepid commander. Of the members of his staff, Capt. W. P. Wallace, aid-de-camp, was wounded early in the action, having his ribs broken; and Lieut. Charles Semple, ordnance-officer, was shot with grape through the leg, being this heroic officer's second wound in the war, the first having been received at Fort Donelson. Major J. R. Throckmorten, Brigade-Quartermaster, rendered invaluable services in removing the wounded. He courted dangerous positions, and captured a lot of Government horses and mules. But this was nothing for a man who had been under fire in nine severe battles. Dr. J. W. Thompson, Brigade-Surgeon, was remarkably efficient in organizing and conducting his field-hospital arrangements. While the left was thus forcing the enemy into town, the right wing, under Gen. Charles Clarke,
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 96
ng broken, and the pieces rendered unmanageable. This was exceedingly unfortunate from the great experience and intrepidity of Capt. Cobb and his cannoniers. At Shiloh the battery was admirably manned, and at Vicksburgh, while in command of Lieut. Graces, it successfully drove back one of the enemy's gunboats. Order being resof the Sixth Kentucky during the first of the action, conspicuous for his daring, but weak from sickness, and scarcely recovered from a terrible wound received at Shiloh, he was forced to yield his position to Major W. L. Clarke. This young officer was quite equal to the task. He was intrepid, skilful, and prudent, and brought hhan they had yet been driven. But during the whole engagement the Fourth and Fifth Kentucky displayed the utmost gallantry, worthy of the laurels they had won at Shiloh. Better men never followed a flag or faced an enemy than compose these two regiments. Col. Thomas H. Hunt, of the Fifth, was in command of the brigade, and rece
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 96
nty-sixth, we received marching orders, and on Sunday the train left for Jackson. Thence by the New-Orleans Railroad, we were quickly spirited to Tangipanoa, in Louisiana, seventy-eight miles from the Crescent City, and sixty from Baton Rouge. This point--one of those railroad mushroom towns, located in the pine woods of St. Helessee and Mississippi troops, and Cobb's Kentucky and Hudson's Mississippi batteries. To Gen. Ruggles were given his old force, the Fourth Louisiana, Col. Allen; Louisiana battalion, Col. Boyd; the Partisan Rangers, and Semmes' battery, together with Preston's brigade, commanded by Colonel A. P. Thompson, of the Third Kentucky, comown, and a third man seized it, receiving a death-wound. But onward went the left. Gen. Ruggles was conspicuous for daring, and his aid, Col. Charles Jones, of Louisiana, while delivering an order, was struck down by a shell and seriously wounded. Our troops were now in the camps, and though tempting enough, none stopped to pill
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 96
oved, but he knew that the wound was a fatal one, and preferred remaining behind Upon the fall back, Gen. Breckinridge ordered the various camps and stores of the enemy to be destroyed. This was accordingly done, and a vast amount of property was burned. There were huge piles of pork, beef, bacon, flour, whisky, molasses, and sugar, quantities of clothing, at which our troops looked wistfully, all given to the flames. The encampments were those of the Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, New-Hampshire, Michigan, and Indiana regiments. There was an air of comfort about all of the tents, and luxurious appointments in many of them. The sutler's stores were crowded with delicacies. But nothing escaped. Many letters, pictures, and documents were picked up, but the boys brought away no booty. Had our means of transportation been more extensive, we could have brought off a month's supply for our army. Gen. Breckinridge intrusted the delicate and important duty of holding the field to
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 96
knew that the wound was a fatal one, and preferred remaining behind Upon the fall back, Gen. Breckinridge ordered the various camps and stores of the enemy to be destroyed. This was accordingly done, and a vast amount of property was burned. There were huge piles of pork, beef, bacon, flour, whisky, molasses, and sugar, quantities of clothing, at which our troops looked wistfully, all given to the flames. The encampments were those of the Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, New-Hampshire, Michigan, and Indiana regiments. There was an air of comfort about all of the tents, and luxurious appointments in many of them. The sutler's stores were crowded with delicacies. But nothing escaped. Many letters, pictures, and documents were picked up, but the boys brought away no booty. Had our means of transportation been more extensive, we could have brought off a month's supply for our army. Gen. Breckinridge intrusted the delicate and important duty of holding the field to Capt. John A
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 96
easily been removed, but he knew that the wound was a fatal one, and preferred remaining behind Upon the fall back, Gen. Breckinridge ordered the various camps and stores of the enemy to be destroyed. This was accordingly done, and a vast amount of property was burned. There were huge piles of pork, beef, bacon, flour, whisky, molasses, and sugar, quantities of clothing, at which our troops looked wistfully, all given to the flames. The encampments were those of the Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, New-Hampshire, Michigan, and Indiana regiments. There was an air of comfort about all of the tents, and luxurious appointments in many of them. The sutler's stores were crowded with delicacies. But nothing escaped. Many letters, pictures, and documents were picked up, but the boys brought away no booty. Had our means of transportation been more extensive, we could have brought off a month's supply for our army. Gen. Breckinridge intrusted the delicate and important duty of holdi
Clinton, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 96
self-possessed as on a dress-parade, and led his brave men into every danger. Falling from the effects of a sunstroke, the command devolved upon Lieut.-Col. Goodwin, a young officer of great promise. The conduct of this brigade (Preston's) was preeminently noble, and I regret that its General could not have been present to have shared its perils and enjoyed its constant succession of triumphs. Unfortunately he is confined to his bed with typhoid fever, at the residence of a friend, near Clinton, Miss. Colonel Thompson, however, as Acting Brigadier, proved a gallant and intrepid commander. Of the members of his staff, Capt. W. P. Wallace, aid-de-camp, was wounded early in the action, having his ribs broken; and Lieut. Charles Semple, ordnance-officer, was shot with grape through the leg, being this heroic officer's second wound in the war, the first having been received at Fort Donelson. Major J. R. Throckmorten, Brigade-Quartermaster, rendered invaluable services in removing the
Saint Helena (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 96
iven from New-Orleans in a few days. --Jackson Mississippian. Grenada appeal narrative. camp on Comite River, Thursday, Aug. 7, 1862. On Saturday, July twenty-sixth, we received marching orders, and on Sunday the train left for Jackson. Thence by the New-Orleans Railroad, we were quickly spirited to Tangipanoa, in Louisiana, seventy-eight miles from the Crescent City, and sixty from Baton Rouge. This point--one of those railroad mushroom towns, located in the pine woods of St. Helena parish--was to be the base of our operations. Camp Moore was in the immediate vicinity, where for several months the Louisiana troops had been fitted for active duty in the field. It was now occupied by a regiment or two, with one battery, and some odds and ends of cavalry, the whole under the command of Ruggles. Upon the arrival of Gen. Breckinridge, he assumed chief command, and the troops were separated into two divisions. To Gen. Clarke were assigned Gen. Ben. Hardin Helm's brigade, c
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 96
been fitted for active duty in the field. It was now occupied by a regiment or two, with one battery, and some odds and ends of cavalry, the whole under the command of Ruggles. Upon the arrival of Gen. Breckinridge, he assumed chief command, and the troops were separated into two divisions. To Gen. Clarke were assigned Gen. Ben. Hardin Helm's brigade, consisting of the Fourth and Fifth Kentucky, Fourth Alabama battalions and Thirty-first Mississippi regiment, Col. Stratham's brigade of Tennessee and Mississippi troops, and Cobb's Kentucky and Hudson's Mississippi batteries. To Gen. Ruggles were given his old force, the Fourth Louisiana, Col. Allen; Louisiana battalion, Col. Boyd; the Partisan Rangers, and Semmes' battery, together with Preston's brigade, commanded by Colonel A. P. Thompson, of the Third Kentucky, composed of the Third, Sixth and Seventh Kentucky, and Twenty-sixth Alabama regiments. These troops were mostly war-worn veterans, but their long marches and the arduou
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