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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Centreville, Va., August 25.--Captain Ned Gillinglingham, of company B, Thirteenth New-York cavalry, with an escort of eight sergeants, whilst going from camp near Centreville as bearer of despatches to Washington, on the twenty-third instant, was met on the road near Allandale, about two o'clock P. M., by a detachment of the Second Massachusetts cavalry, the Sergeant of the latter asking Captain Gillingham if they need apprehend any danger, to which Captain Gillingham replied: So far, we have not met with any obstruction. Captain Gillingham had scarcely gone over four hundred yards, when he was met by a party of Mosby's cavalry, consisting of about one hundred men, by whom he was ordered, under fire, to halt. Captain Gillingham, taking them for our own troops, (as they were dressed similar to his own men,) replied, Hold up firing — you are fools — you are firing on Government troops, to which the captain of said troops replied: Surrender there, you Yankee----. Captain Gilling
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
imilar to his own men,) replied, Hold up firing — you are fools — you are firing on Government troops, to which the captain of said troops replied: Surrender there, you Yankee----. Captain Gillingham replied he could not see the joke. Then, turning to Sergeant Long, Orderly of company B, and to Sergeant Burnham, ordered them to draw their sabres and follow him. A general conflict ensued, in which sabres and pistols were freely used, resulting in the wounding of Orderly Sergeant Long and Sergeant Zeagle, both of company B, who, with four other sergeants, were all taken prisoners. Captain Ned Gillingham and Sergeant Burnham effected their escape, the former having been wounded in the arm, and the latter in the hip, as well as having their horses shot. Obtaining horses on the road, they reached Washington about six o'clock P. M. Captain Gillingham is a man highly esteemed by both his officers and men, and was warmly welcomed back to camp, to which he returned the following da
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Centreville, Va., August 25.--Captain Ned Gillinglingham, of company B, Thirteenth New-York cavalry, with an escort of eight sergeants, whilst going from camp near Centreville as bearer of despatches to Washington, on the twenty-third instant, was met on the road near Allandale, about two o'clock P. M., by a detachment of the Second Massachusetts cavalry, the Sergeant of the latter asking Captain Gillingham if they need apprehend any danger, to which Captain Gillingham replied: So far, we have not met with any obstruction. Captain Gillingham had scarcely gone over four hundred yards, when he was met by a party of Mosby's cavalry, consisting of about one hundred men, by whom he was ordered, under fire, to halt. Captain Gillingham, taking them for our own troops, (as they were dressed similar to his own men,) replied, Hold up firing — you are fools — you are firing on Government troops, to which the captain of said troops replied: Surrender there, you Yankee----. Captain Gillingh
sergeants, whilst going from camp near Centreville as bearer of despatches to Washington, on the twenty-third instant, was met on the road near Allandale, about two o'clock P. M., by a detachment of the Second Massachusetts cavalry, the Sergeant of the latter asking Captain Gillingham if they need apprehend any danger, to which Captain Gillingham replied: So far, we have not met with any obstruction. Captain Gillingham had scarcely gone over four hundred yards, when he was met by a party of Mosby's cavalry, consisting of about one hundred men, by whom he was ordered, under fire, to halt. Captain Gillingham, taking them for our own troops, (as they were dressed similar to his own men,) replied, Hold up firing — you are fools — you are firing on Government troops, to which the captain of said troops replied: Surrender there, you Yankee----. Captain Gillingham replied he could not see the joke. Then, turning to Sergeant Long, Orderly of company B, and to Sergeant Burnham, ordered the
Sergeant Long (search for this): chapter 6
is own men,) replied, Hold up firing — you are fools — you are firing on Government troops, to which the captain of said troops replied: Surrender there, you Yankee----. Captain Gillingham replied he could not see the joke. Then, turning to Sergeant Long, Orderly of company B, and to Sergeant Burnham, ordered them to draw their sabres and follow him. A general conflict ensued, in which sabres and pistols were freely used, resulting in the wounding of Orderly Sergeant Long and Sergeant Zeagle,Orderly Sergeant Long and Sergeant Zeagle, both of company B, who, with four other sergeants, were all taken prisoners. Captain Ned Gillingham and Sergeant Burnham effected their escape, the former having been wounded in the arm, and the latter in the hip, as well as having their horses shot. Obtaining horses on the road, they reached Washington about six o'clock P. M. Captain Gillingham is a man highly esteemed by both his officers and men, and was warmly welcomed back to camp, to which he returned the following da
Ned Gillinglingham (search for this): chapter 6
Centreville, Va., August 25.--Captain Ned Gillinglingham, of company B, Thirteenth New-York cavalry, with an escort of eight sergeants, whilst going from camp near Centreville as bearer of despatches to Washington, on the twenty-third instant, was met on the road near Allandale, about two o'clock P. M., by a detachment of the Second Massachusetts cavalry, the Sergeant of the latter asking Captain Gillingham if they need apprehend any danger, to which Captain Gillingham replied: So far, we have not met with any obstruction. Captain Gillingham had scarcely gone over four hundred yards, when he was met by a party of Mosby's cavalry, consisting of about one hundred men, by whom he was ordered, under fire, to halt. Captain Gillingham, taking them for our own troops, (as they were dressed similar to his own men,) replied, Hold up firing — you are fools — you are firing on Government troops, to which the captain of said troops replied: Surrender there, you Yankee----. Captain Gillingh
milar to his own men,) replied, Hold up firing — you are fools — you are firing on Government troops, to which the captain of said troops replied: Surrender there, you Yankee----. Captain Gillingham replied he could not see the joke. Then, turning to Sergeant Long, Orderly of company B, and to Sergeant Burnham, ordered them to draw their sabres and follow him. A general conflict ensued, in which sabres and pistols were freely used, resulting in the wounding of Orderly Sergeant Long and Sergeant Zeagle, both of company B, who, with four other sergeants, were all taken prisoners. Captain Ned Gillingham and Sergeant Burnham effected their escape, the former having been wounded in the arm, and the latter in the hip, as well as having their horses shot. Obtaining horses on the road, they reached Washington about six o'clock P. M. Captain Gillingham is a man highly esteemed by both his officers and men, and was warmly welcomed back to camp, to which he returned the following da
Emily M. Washington (search for this): chapter 6
Centreville, Va., August 25.--Captain Ned Gillinglingham, of company B, Thirteenth New-York cavalry, with an escort of eight sergeants, whilst going from camp near Centreville as bearer of despatches to Washington, on the twenty-third instant, was met on the road near Allandale, about two o'clock P. M., by a detachment of the Second Massachusetts cavalry, the Sergeant of the latter asking Captain Gillingham if they need apprehend any danger, to which Captain Gillingham replied: So far, we have not met with any obstruction. Captain Gillingham had scarcely gone over four hundred yards, when he was met by a party of Mosby's cavalry, consisting of about one hundred men, by whom he was ordered, under fire, to halt. Captain Gillingham, taking them for our own troops, (as they were dressed similar to his own men,) replied, Hold up firing — you are fools — you are firing on Government troops, to which the captain of said troops replied: Surrender there, you Yankee----. Captain Gillingh
gham replied: So far, we have not met with any obstruction. Captain Gillingham had scarcely gone over four hundred yards, when he was met by a party of Mosby's cavalry, consisting of about one hundred men, by whom he was ordered, under fire, to halt. Captain Gillingham, taking them for our own troops, (as they were dressed similar to his own men,) replied, Hold up firing — you are fools — you are firing on Government troops, to which the captain of said troops replied: Surrender there, you Yankee----. Captain Gillingham replied he could not see the joke. Then, turning to Sergeant Long, Orderly of company B, and to Sergeant Burnham, ordered them to draw their sabres and follow him. A general conflict ensued, in which sabres and pistols were freely used, resulting in the wounding of Orderly Sergeant Long and Sergeant Zeagle, both of company B, who, with four other sergeants, were all taken prisoners. Captain Ned Gillingham and Sergeant Burnham effected their escape, the former hav
Ned Gillingham (search for this): chapter 6
cond Massachusetts cavalry, the Sergeant of the latter asking Captain Gillingham if they need apprehend any danger, to which Captain GillinghaCaptain Gillingham replied: So far, we have not met with any obstruction. Captain Gillingham had scarcely gone over four hundred yards, when he was met by a pCaptain Gillingham had scarcely gone over four hundred yards, when he was met by a party of Mosby's cavalry, consisting of about one hundred men, by whom he was ordered, under fire, to halt. Captain Gillingham, taking them foCaptain Gillingham, taking them for our own troops, (as they were dressed similar to his own men,) replied, Hold up firing — you are fools — you are firing on Government troopsain of said troops replied: Surrender there, you Yankee----. Captain Gillingham replied he could not see the joke. Then, turning to Sergeantho, with four other sergeants, were all taken prisoners. Captain Ned Gillingham and Sergeant Burnham effected their escape, the former havi the road, they reached Washington about six o'clock P. M. Captain Gillingham is a man highly esteemed by both his officers and men, and wa
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