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, a half-mile distant from the city. Thus matters stood till the fourth instant, when General Ross sent in a communication, asking what would be the treatment of prisoners if taken by negro soldiers. Colonel Coates replied that they would be treated with the respect due prisoners of war. On the night of the fourth, Ross was reenforced by a brigade of Tennessee troops, numbering eight hundred men, commanded by Brigadier-General R. V. Richardson; and at seven o'clock on the morning of the fifth, an attack was made upon Major McKee, who held the redoubt, while a portion of the enemy went to the left, flanking his position, and entered the town, and came within twenty feet of Colonel Coates's headquarters before they received a check from our men, who were pouring a deadly fire upon them from the windows. Here was almost a hand-to-hand conflict, which lasted four hours, when finally our sharp-shooters had picked off all their gunners, and completely silenced the guns which had riddl
omen and children in it, I spared it. We found there three thirty-two pounder guns and carriages. The guns I brought away, and burnt the carriages and platforms. Hearing that the rebels had a pontoon-bridge a mile from the mouth of Little River, I sent the Cricket up, and burned it. I remained at Trinity until the morning of the fourth, when we proceeded down Black River, and picking up all the cotton near the bank, anchored at dark about twelve miles from the mouth. At daylight on the fifth, I got under way, and arrived at this place at meridian. I am much indebted to the officers of the different vessels for the manner in which they performed their duty. I regret to report that eight men were wounded on the Fort Hindman, one mortally, (since dead,) and two severely. One man was wounded severely on the Osage; Acting Ensign Ezra Beaman, of the Choctaw, whom I took with me as signal officer, was wounded in the right foot while on board of the Ouachita. I would respectfully
urned to his camp yesterday evening, without having lost a man during his reconnoissance. At cavalry headquarters last night, no special details of General Merrill's operations had been received, except that he had been to Madison Court-House, and that he was, at the time his courier was despatched on Saturday night, at Barnett's Ford. He had encountered no considerable force of the enemy, and had met with no losses. The First corps, General Newton, left its camp on the night of Friday, fifth instant, and proceeded to the vicinity of Raccoon Ford. The corps, which was afterward followed by two divisions of the Third, encamped two miles from the river; but no important demonstrations against the enemy were made. Warren's movements on the left seem to have drawn the main body of the enemy to Morton's Ford; while at Raccoon Ford but comparatively a small body was observable on the opposite bank of the river. Our total loss is covered by two hundred, but a small proportion being
ugh he and Adjutant Dean were bullet-proof. Captain Kenyon and Lieutenant Perriont, both on the Colonel's staff, exposed themselves almost recklessly, and escaped without a scratch. You have got to see a street-fight to comprehend it. I can't describe it. Company A did itself credit, as it always tries to do. Orton. Ingersoll. Rebel account. Demopolis, Ala., March 11, 1864 To Adjutant-General Cooper: General Lee telegraphs that Ross and Richardson attacked Yazoo City on the fifth instant, capturing many stores and destroying much cotton about being shipped. The enemy retired to the city and held it until reinforced. They were driven out of the city, which was recaptured, while stores were being destroyed. We have quite a number of prisoners. Our loss was about fifty killed and wounded. The enemy still occupy Yazoo City and Liverpool, intrenching at the latter place. Sherman issued a general order at Canton, in which he speaks of many regiments in his army entitl
olonel Rogers, of the Fifteenth Illinois, was slightly wounded by a rifle-shot. At sundown the enemy had been driven across Baker's Creek, and we held the bridge during the night with two twenty-pounder Parrotts, supported by two regiments of infantry. During the night General McPherson communicated by one of his aids, Lieutenant Vernay, with General Hurlbut, who lay six miles north of us, and learned that the enemy was stubbornly disputing his advance. At sunrise, on the morning of the fifth, the enemy commenced a heavy artillery-fire upon us from the crest of a long ridge which ran parallel with Baker's Creek and three fourths of a mile distant from it. An open level plain lay between us, and the enemy's column could be distinctly seen from our camp in line of battle. The third and fourth divisions of the Seventeenth corps, Brigadier-Generals Leggett and Crocker commanding, were thrown across the creek, and formed in line of battle, facing the enemy, while our Parrotts replied
ame in the Stockdale, with iron, etc., for the repairs of our vessel. On the afternoon of the sixth, the Chickasaw went down and shelled Fort Gaines, and on the morning of the seventh I received a. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864. sir: In obedience to your order of the sixth instant, I respectfully submit the following report of damages to the rigging of this ship during an of Fort Powell, exchanging several shot, and being struck three times. On the morning of the sixth, I proceeded again to Fort Powell, which I found deserted and blown up. I towed out another barging Squadron, August 16, 1864. sir: I have the honor to inform the Department that on the sixth instant I ordered a survey to be made of the hull, armor, etc., of the iron-clad Tennessee, and I hep Richmond, inside of Mobile Bay, August 13, 1864. sir: In obedience to your order of the sixth instant, hereto appended, we have the honor respectfully to report that we have made a strict and ca
re loss, and our forces moved up the East-Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, Willcox's division stopping at Greenville, the former home of Andy Johnson, and Shackleford's occupying Jonesboro. Every thing remained quiet until the twenty-eighth ult., when Shackleford was flanked by the enemy, and forced to fall back on Greenville. Next day, however, the rebels retreated, and Shackleford moved up to his former position. The enemy's attitude remained threatening, and on the morning of the sixth instant, heavy firing was heard in the direction of Rogersville, a small town situated on the north bank of the Holston River. A detachment of the Third Indiana cavalry was immediately sent out to learn the result, and toward evening sent in a courier with the intelligence that our forces at Rogersville, consisting of the Second Tennessee and Seventh Ohio cavalry, and Second Illinois battery, had been defeated, and that the enemy was reported moving on Bull's Gap, eighteen miles in our rear. T
, who also sent a cavalry force across the Tennessee, above Chattanooga, which destroyed a large wagon train in the Sequatchie Valley, captured McMinsville and other points on the railroad, thus almost completely cutting off the supplies of General Rosecrans's army. Fortunately for us, the line of the railroad was well defended, and the enemy's cavalry being successfully attacked by Colonel McCook, at Anderson's Cross-Roads, on the second October; by General Mitchell, at Shelbyville, on the sixth; and by General Crook, at Farmington, on the eighth, were mostly captured or destroyed. Major-General Grant arrived at Louisville, and on the nineteenth, in accordance with the orders of the President, assumed general command of the Departments of the Tennessee, Cumberland, and Ohio. In accordance with his recommendation, Major-General G. W. Thomas was placed in the immediate command of the department of the Cumberland, and Major-General Sherman of that of the Tennessee. As the supply
ch to the relief of Burnside. General Elliot had been ordered by Thomas, on the twenty-sixth of November, to proceed from Alexandria, Tennessee, to Knoxville, with his cavalry division, to aid in the relief of that place. The approach of Sherman caused Longstreet to raise the siege of Knoxville and retreat eastward on the night of the fourth of December. Sherman succeeded in throwing his cavalry into Knoxville on the night of the third. Sherman arrived in person at Knoxville on the sixth, and after a conference with Burnside in reference to t organizing a pursuing force large enough to overtake the enemy and beat him, or drive him out of the State, Burnside was of the opinion that the corps of Granger, in conjunction with his own command, was sufficient for that purpose, and on the seventh addressed to Sherman the following communication: Knoxville, Dec. 7, 1863. To Major-General Sherman: I desire to express to you and your command my most hearty thanks and gratitud
beef is concerned. In regard to bacon, the stock is about exhausted-hence beef is our only hope. I know the prospect is very discouraging, and it only remains with those of us having charge of this most important work to do all we can to exhaust our resources; and when we have done this, our country cannot complain of us. If we fail to do all that can be done, and our cause shall fail, upon us will rest the responsibility; therefore let us employ every means at our command. Again, on the sixth, he says: Major A. can explain to you the great and absolute necessity for prompt action in the matter; for, Major, I assure you, that nearly all now depends on you. And on the nineteenth of October, he says: Captain Townsend, A. C.S., having a leave of absence for thirty days from the army of Tennessee, I have prevailed on him to see you and explain to you my straitened condition, and the imminent danger of our army suffering for the want of beef. And on the twentieth October, he wrote: T
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