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es despatched his aids to bring up any troops they met to fill this blank. Major Tremaine, of his staff, fell in with General Zook, at the head of his brigade, (Second corps,) and this gallant officer instantly volunteered to take Barnes's place. Wreached the ground, Barnes's disordered troops impeded the advance of the brigade. If you can't get out of the way, cried Zook, lie down and I will march over you. Barnes ordered his men to lie down, and the chivalric Zook and his splendid brigade, under the personal direction of General Birney, did march over them right into the breach. Alas! poor Zook soon fell, mortally wounded, and half of his brigade perished with him. It was about this time — near seven P. M.--that Sickles was struck bydivision, of the Fifth corps, which lost over fifty per cent of its numbers, holding its position most obstinately. General Zook, so highly complimented by Historicus, commanded a brigade of Caldwell's division. When night fell, our lines were
etermined opposition. The officers and men of my command cannot be awarded too great honor for their heroic conduct in this, the most fiery ordeal of the war. The whole thing was more a matter of individuals than of organization, and consequently the glory is more personal than in any battle I know of. My loss was heavy, but were the dead only living, I should esteem the triumph cheaply purchased. The temporary absence, on account of wounds received in this battle, of Captain Huston, Lieutenants Zoller and Thomas, is a source of considerable embarrassment, as they are most valuable officers. My color-bearer, Corporal Murphy, was killed within a few feet of the summit, in advance of the entire brigade. I had no braver man in my command. Adjutant Johnston and Surgeon Miller have my thanks for the services rendered me, and I especially commend Sergeants Wolf and McDermont for their handsome behavior. You are respectfully referred to Major Campbell's report for those honorably mentio
Frank Zoellner (search for this): chapter 21
who fell in the fight of November eighteenth, in front of Fort Sanders. Fort Hill--At the extreme eastern point of our lines, in memory of Captain Hill, of the Twelfth Kentucky cavalry, who fell during the siege. Battery Fearns--On Flint Hill, in memory of Lieutenant and Adjutant Charles W. Fearns, Forty-fifth Ohio mounted infantry, who fell in the action of November eighteenth, in front of Fort Sanders. Battery Zoellner--Between Fort Sanders and Second Creek, in memory of Lieutenant Frank Zoellner, Second Michigan volunteers, who fell mortally wounded, in the assault upon the enemy's rifle-pits in front of Fort Sanders, on the morning of November twenty-fourth. Battery Stearman--In the gorge between Temperance Hill and Mabrey's Hill, in memory of Lieutenant William Stearman, Thirteenth Kentucky volunteers, who fell near Loudon, Tennessee. Fort Stanley--Comprising all the works upon the central hill on the south side of the river, in memory of Captain C. B. Stanley, For
Sergeant L. Zimmerman (search for this): chapter 48
Harper's Ferry, Va., January 10, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report the following list of killed and wounded in the Independent battalion Maryland cavalry, Major Cole commanding, during an attack made on the camp on Loudon Heights, Va., by Mosby's and White's forces, at three o'clock A. M. on the tenth of January, 1864: Killed.--Sergeant J. J. Kerns, company B; private George Buford, company D. Wounded.--Company A: Captain G. W. F. Vernon, wound of head and left eye; Orderly Sergeant L. Zimmerman, flesh-wound of the left leg; private D. W. Carnes, gunshot, compound fracture of right leg; private H. F. Null, wound of abdomen; private I. Craighton, flesh-wound of left leg; private E. Goodwin, gunshot, compound fracture of left leg; private Samuel Stone, wound of abdomen. Company B: Lieutenant Samuel Rivers, flesh-wound of left foot; Orderly Sergeant J. C. Stouffer, flesh-wound of left hip; Sergeant C. W. Ham, flesh-wound of left arm; private Samuel Rivers, gunshot, compo
Frederick Zimmerman (search for this): chapter 16
caisson filled with ammunition already on fire with two wounded horses attached to it, cut them loose and ran the burning carriage down the hill before it exploded. The colors of the First Ohio, the first on the hill, were carried, while ascending it, at different times, by the following men and officers: Corporal John Emery, company I, wounded. Corporal Wm. McLaughlin, company I, killed. Captain Nicholas Trapp, wounded. Corporal Thos. Bawler, company A, wounded. Corporal Frederick Zimmerman. Major Stafford. The foregoing are but a few of the many instances of heroism displayed on this occasion deserving especial mention: Major William Birch, Ninety-third Ohio, and Major S. C. Erwine, Sixth Ohio infantry, who fell while leading their men, were soldiers of rare efficiency, and their loss will be severely felt by the service and lamented by their friends. My entire staff, as has always been the case in the numerous battles in which they have been engaged, conduc
John P. Zetlich (search for this): chapter 5
n; and Peter Parks, seaman. These officers are certainly in error in their statement that a row of buoys stretched from the shore a distance of one to two hundred yards. We now know, that the channel adjacent to the shore was entirely clear of torpedoes, and that the latter were placed between the two large buoys, to which I have referred in my reports. In addition to the persons named in this report as saved, the boat from the Metacomet, under Acting Ensign Nields, rescued Acting Ensign John P. Zetlich, Chauncey V. Dean, Quartermaster; Wm. Roberts, Quartermaster; James McDonald, seaman; Geo. Major, seaman; James Thorn, seaman; Chas. Packard, ordinary seaman; Wm. Fadden, landsman; and Wm. C. West, coal-heaver — with the pilot of the Tecumseh, John Collins. Four others also swam to the beach, and were taken prisoners at Fort Morgan and immediately sent away. This information was received when communicating by flag of truce with the Fort. none of them, we were told, were of
Arnold Zenetti (search for this): chapter 71
they were assisting the Adjutant into an ambulance. The party, ambulance and all, was taken by the rebels. First Lieutenant J. W. Day, company E; Captain J. K. Floyd and First Lieutenant J. R. Hill, company H; First Lieutenant L. B. Cabins, company I; First Lieutenant B. N. Manas, company K, are also missing, with about fifty privates. The most of the fighting was done by the One Hundred and Thirty-second, losing in all about eighty. Lieutenant and Acting Quartermaster of company A, Arnold Zenetti, killed. Company A.--Sergeant Richter, Corporal John Dennman, Corporal Christian Wullen, Lewis Strab, Edward Thaller. Company B.--Corporal James Folley, Sergeant James Dekeb, B. Schmidt, Thomas Clinton, Luther Cook, Arthur Corcoran, William Edwards, William Elmer, John Hargan, Michael Kane, James Smith. Company C.--First Lieutenant Joseph Grasing. Company G.--Second Lieutenant W. A. C. Whyan. There are among the missing other names I was not able to secure. From the strengt
W. W. Zener (search for this): chapter 19
and to get, if possible, a position where our artillery might be made effective. Colonel Lippincott moved promptly with his command, and I soon had the pleasure of hearing from him, that he had secured a good position for our artillery. Adjutant W. W. Zener, of the Eighteenth Indiana, now on my staff, was ordered to bring up two pieces of the First Michigan battery, under command of Lieutenant Stillman, which he accomplished with despatch. The pieces were brought up, and placed in battery un, courage, and ability. They are as follows: Major J. H. Elliott, Thirty-third Illinois, Inspector and Chief of Staff; Captain S. H. Dunbar, Eighth Indiana, A. A. A. General; Captain John Reuss, Eighth Indiana, A. A. C. S.; Lieutenant and Adjutant W. W. Zener, Eighteenth Indiana, A. D. C. and P. M.; Lieutenant G. H. Fifer, Thirty-third Illinois, A. D. C.; Lieutenant J. G. Seaver, Ninety-ninth Illinois, Ord. Officer; Major Lillie, Ninety-ninth Illinois, Senior Surgeon, was detailed on Operating
John B. Zellick (search for this): chapter 4
he bay for the purpose of attacking the enemy. At seven took station between Fort Morgan and the wooden vessels of the fleet in line of battle. At fifteen minutes past seven opened fire on the fort, the enemy firing rapidly. At eight the United States Monitor Tecumseh was blown up and sunk by a torpedo when within about a cable length of us, and shortly after the following men, having been saved from the wreck, were brought on board in a boat belonging to the Metacomet: Acting Ensign John B. Zellick, Quartermaster Wm. Roberts, Quartermaster Chauncey P. Dean. Seamen: George Major, James McDonald. Ordinary seamen: James Burnes, Charles Packand, James Lands, William Tidder. Coal-passer: William West. At half-past 8 passed Fort Morgan, and steamed slowly up the bay. At ten minutes past nine the after-turret broke down. At fifteen minutes past nine received order from flag-ship to attack the rebel ram Tennessee, which surrendered at forty-five minutes past nine. Anchored wi
o the First brigade, Third division, Sixteenth army corps, belongs the credit of giving the enemy the first check, of turning his flank, of driving him further, and of holding longer the grounds captured, than any troops on the field. . . . . Captain George R. Brown, of the Ninth Indiana battery, has proved himself a capable, cool, and gallant officer. Captain John Tobin, company K, Fifty-eighth Illinois, fell, shot through the heart, while gallantly leading his men in the charge. Captain F. S. Zeek, company C, Eighty-ninth Indiana, fell severely wounded in both feet, while bravely leading his men across the field. In this connection, I would respectfully state that quite a number of the One Hundred and Seventy-eighth New-York, with their colors, were with me on the three-mile charge through the woods, and acquitted themselves with honor. Again thanking the brave officers and men whom I have the honor to command, I am, Captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. F. Ly
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