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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore).

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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
A national account. Bull's Gap, Tenn., Nov. 11, 1863. More than a month since, the division of reenforcements, under General O. B. Willcox, entered East-Tennessee, and, with Shackleford's division, moved immediately on the rebels at Blue Spring. After a sharp engagement, the enemy was forced to retire, with severe loss, aus the following detailed account of this operation, which was not only creditable in itself, but has gone far to give a new turn to confederate fortunes in East-Tennessee: The affair at Rogersville, East-Tennessee, affords some mitigation of the general ignoring of the campaign there. A series of movements of the most unfortunTennessee, affords some mitigation of the general ignoring of the campaign there. A series of movements of the most unfortunate and disgraceful character, illustrated by the retreat of General Williams, glorious to him and his command, but wholly shameful to those responsible for his exposed position, the only other matter of commendation, justifies this sweeping phrase. A true relation of these will, doubtless, fill a dark page in history. Let us tur
Greenville, North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
avenues of escape through which the greater part of the enemy got away. This, however, was probably for good reasons. The most unfortunate part of the affair was the return of the army that night to camp, by order of General Jones, against the earnest remonstrance of Colonel Giltner. This resulted in the escape of many prisoners, and the loss of any material results beyond the captures. Subsequent intelligence shows that four men, pursuing the retreating Yankees within a few miles of Greensville, captured a wagon which had escaped by Chism's Ford, and carried dismay into the camp of the Yankees at Rheatown and Greenville; and that while the confederate cavalry was hastening to secure its communications, the Yankees were stampeding through Greenville — horses, cattle, artillery, wagons, men and officers blockading the streets, filling the sidewalks into the very doors of the houses, a dismayed and disorganized mob. On they went even to Russellville, twenty-five miles, galloping ba
Carter's Valley (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
rds, in the Holston, below Rogersville. He, finding great obstacles in the way of his advance, had determined to cross the river at Long's ford, and take the Carter's Valley road to Rogersville, in the rear of Garrard's camp. This transferred him to the right, instead of the left of the army, and brought him by the north of the Yankee position, instead of by the south, to the rear or west of it. Colonel Giltner had received information of a home guard camp, on the Carter's Valley road, by a citizen, whom he sent at once to General Jones, and by means of his information he was enabled to surprise their camp about daylight, where he captured some thirty or f their arms in the woods to the right of the road, and in front of the lane last mentioned. While this was going on in front, General Jones had moved down the Carter Valley road to the left of the enemy's camp, to the intersection with the main road, a mile east of Rogersville, where he despatched a detachment of Witcher's battali
Jonesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
onal account. Bull's Gap, Tenn., Nov. 11, 1863. More than a month since, the division of reenforcements, under General O. B. Willcox, entered East-Tennessee, and, with Shackleford's division, moved immediately on the rebels at Blue Spring. After a sharp engagement, the enemy was forced to retire, with severe loss, and our forces moved up the East-Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, Willcox's division stopping at Greenville, the former home of Andy Johnson, and Shackleford's occupying Jonesboro. Every thing remained quiet until the twenty-eighth ult., when Shackleford was flanked by the enemy, and forced to fall back on Greenville. Next day, however, the rebels retreated, and Shackleford moved up to his former position. The enemy's attitude remained threatening, and on the morning of the sixth instant, heavy firing was heard in the direction of Rogersville, a small town situated on the north bank of the Holston River. A detachment of the Third Indiana cavalry was immediatel
Ollis Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
eat of General Williams, glorious to him and his command, but wholly shameful to those responsible for his exposed position, the only other matter of commendation, justifies this sweeping phrase. A true relation of these will, doubtless, fill a dark page in history. Let us turn to the brighter point, and present to your readers the truth. A few days since, information of a reliable character was received by General Ransom of the exact position, numbers, and condition of the Yankees at Big Creek, four miles east of Rogersville. The nearest supporting force being at Greenville, he conceived the idea of cutting them off by a rapid night march of cavalry upon their front and rear. Brigadier-General Jones, accordingly, was directed to put his brigade in motion, so as to bring himself, on Thursday evening, within a night's march, by the south side of Holston River, down the valley of Buck Creek; while Colonel Giltner, commanding Brigadier-General Williams's brigade, was to move from
Smiths Ford (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s, it was nearly eleven o'clock when the column had passed the river, with a march of twenty-one miles between them and the enemy's camp. The intense darkness of the night, with rain, made the march one of great difficulty and discomfort, but it was cheerfully encountered by officers and men, who seemed to have no doubt of the success which awaited them. At Lyons's Store the head of the column encountered the brigade of General Jones, who was understood to have started for Dodson's and Smith's fords, in the Holston, below Rogersville. He, finding great obstacles in the way of his advance, had determined to cross the river at Long's ford, and take the Carter's Valley road to Rogersville, in the rear of Garrard's camp. This transferred him to the right, instead of the left of the army, and brought him by the north of the Yankee position, instead of by the south, to the rear or west of it. Colonel Giltner had received information of a home guard camp, on the Carter's Valley road, by
Holston (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ated, and Shackleford moved up to his former position. The enemy's attitude remained threatening, and on the morning of the sixth instant, heavy firing was heard in the direction of Rogersville, a small town situated on the north bank of the Holston River. A detachment of the Third Indiana cavalry was immediately sent out to learn the result, and toward evening sent in a courier with the intelligence that our forces at Rogersville, consisting of the Second Tennessee and Seventh Ohio cavalry, them off by a rapid night march of cavalry upon their front and rear. Brigadier-General Jones, accordingly, was directed to put his brigade in motion, so as to bring himself, on Thursday evening, within a night's march, by the south side of Holston River, down the valley of Buck Creek; while Colonel Giltner, commanding Brigadier-General Williams's brigade, was to move from Kingsport and its vicinity, on the north side of the river. During the afternoon of the fifth Colonel Giltner concentrat
Bull's Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Doc. 8.-fight at Rogersville, Tenn. A national account. Bull's Gap, Tenn., Nov. 11, 1863. More than a month since, the division of reenforcements, under General O. B. Willcox, entered East-Tennessee, and, with Shackleford's division, moved immediately on the rebels at Blue Spring. After a sharp engagement, the enemy was forced to retire, with severe loss, and our forces moved up the East-Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, Willcox's division stopping at Greenville, the former home ot, and toward evening sent in a courier with the intelligence that our forces at Rogersville, consisting of the Second Tennessee and Seventh Ohio cavalry, and Second Illinois battery, had been defeated, and that the enemy was reported moving on Bull's Gap, eighteen miles in our rear. Then there was mustering in hot haste, and both divisions were quickly on the road for the Gap. Lick Creek was to be crossed before reaching the Gap, and it was feared the rebels would attempt to destroy the bridge
Greenville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
d our forces moved up the East-Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, Willcox's division stopping at Greenville, the former home of Andy Johnson, and Shackleford's occupying Jonesboro. Every thing remain the twenty-eighth ult., when Shackleford was flanked by the enemy, and forced to fall back on Greenville. Next day, however, the rebels retreated, and Shackleford moved up to his former position. T Yankees at Big Creek, four miles east of Rogersville. The nearest supporting force being at Greenville, he conceived the idea of cutting them off by a rapid night march of cavalry upon their front h had escaped by Chism's Ford, and carried dismay into the camp of the Yankees at Rheatown and Greenville; and that while the confederate cavalry was hastening to secure its communications, the Yankees were stampeding through Greenville — horses, cattle, artillery, wagons, men and officers blockading the streets, filling the sidewalks into the very doors of the houses, a dismayed and disorganized
Kingsport (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
brigade in motion, so as to bring himself, on Thursday evening, within a night's march, by the south side of Holston River, down the valley of Buck Creek; while Colonel Giltner, commanding Brigadier-General Williams's brigade, was to move from Kingsport and its vicinity, on the north side of the river. During the afternoon of the fifth Colonel Giltner concentrated his command, and went into camp at Kingsport, and ordered his force to move at six o'clock P. M. Owing to great difficulty in passKingsport, and ordered his force to move at six o'clock P. M. Owing to great difficulty in passing the fords, it was nearly eleven o'clock when the column had passed the river, with a march of twenty-one miles between them and the enemy's camp. The intense darkness of the night, with rain, made the march one of great difficulty and discomfort, but it was cheerfully encountered by officers and men, who seemed to have no doubt of the success which awaited them. At Lyons's Store the head of the column encountered the brigade of General Jones, who was understood to have started for Dodson'
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