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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore).

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erings they have endured) that they entered their country's service. They have been the most loyal, devoted, and earnest men. Even on the last days of their lives they have said that all they hoped for was just to live and enter the ranks again and meet their foes. It is a most glorious record in reference to the devotion of our men to their country. I do not think their patriotism has ever been equalled in the history of the world. All of which is respectfully submitted. B. F. Wade, Chairman. war Department, Washington City, May 4, 1864. sir: I have the honor to submit to you a report made to this department by Colonel Hoffman, Commissary General of prisoners, in regard to the condition of Union soldiers who have, until within a few days, been prisoners of war at Richmond, and would respectfully request that your Committee immediately proceed to Annapolis to take testimony there, and examine with their own eyes the condition of those who have been returned from rebel captiv
Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 2
nt and starvation, the result of which will be that few, if any, of the prisoners that have been in their hands during the past winter will ever again be in a condition to render any service, or even to enjoy life. Your obedient servant, Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Hon. B. F. Wade, Chairman of Joint Committee on Conduct of the War. office of Commissary General of prisoners, Washington, D. C., May 3, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report that, pursuant to your instructions of thefficer, deserves much credit for the very satisfactory condition to which he has brought his command. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. Hoffman, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary General of Prisoners. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C. Testimony. Annapolis, Maryland, May 6, 1864. Howard Leedom, sworn and examined: by the Chairman: Question. To what company and regiment have you belonged? Answer. Company G, Fifty-secon
Doc. 2.-the returned prisoners. In the Senate of the United States. May 9, 1864. Mr. Wade submitted the following report. The Joint Committee on the conduct and expenditures of the war submitted the following report, with the accompanying testimony. On the fourth instant your Committee received a communication of that date from the Secretary of War, inclosing the report of Colonel Hoffman, Commissary General of prisoners, dated May third, calling the attention of the Committee to the condition of returned Union prisoners, with the request that the Committee would immediately proceed to Annapolis and examine with their own eyes the condition of those who have been returned from rebel captivity. The Committee resolved that they would comply with the request of the Secretary of War on the first opportunity. The fifth of May was devoted by the Committee to concluding their labors upon the investigation of the Fort Pillow massacre. On the sixth of May, however, the Committe
starvation, the result of which will be that few, if any, of the prisoners that have been in their hands during the past winter will ever again be in a condition to render any service, or even to enjoy life. Your obedient servant, Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Hon. B. F. Wade, Chairman of Joint Committee on Conduct of the War. office of Commissary General of prisoners, Washington, D. C., May 3, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report that, pursuant to your instructions of the second instant, I proceeded, yesterday morning, to Annapolis, with a view to see that the paroled prisoners about to arrive there from Richmond were properly received and cared for. The flag-of-truce boat New-York, under the charge of Major Mulford, with thirty-two officers, three hundred and sixty-three enlisted men, and one citizen on board, reached the wharf at the Naval School hospital about ten o'clock. On going on board, I found the officers generally in good health, and much cheered by their
m the Secretary of War, inclosing the report of Colonel Hoffman, Commissary General of prisoners, dated May third, calling the attention of the Committee to the condition of returned Union prisoners, with the request that the Committee would immediately proceed to Annapolis and examine with their own eyes the condition of those who have been returned from rebel captivity. The Committee resolved that they would comply with the request of the Secretary of War on the first opportunity. The fifth of May was devoted by the Committee to concluding their labors upon the investigation of the Fort Pillow massacre. On the sixth of May, however, the Committee proceeded to Annapolis and Baltimore, and examined the condition of our returned soldiers, and took the testimony of several of them, together with the testimony of surgeons and other persons in attendance upon the hospitals. That testimony, with the communication of the Secretary of War, and the report of Colonel Hoffman, is herewith tr
Doc. 2.-the returned prisoners. In the Senate of the United States. May 9, 1864. Mr. Wade submitted the following report. The Joint Committee on the conduct and expenditures of the war submitted the following report, with the accompanying testimony. On the fourth instant your Committee received a communication of that date from the Secretary of War, inclosing the report of Colonel Hoffman, Commissary General of prisoners, dated May third, calling the attention of the Committee to the condition of returned Union prisoners, with the request that the Committee would immediately proceed to Annapolis and examine with their own eyes the condition of those who have been returned from rebel captivity. The Committee resolved that they would comply with the request of the Secretary of War on the first opportunity. The fifth of May was devoted by the Committee to concluding their labors upon the investigation of the Fort Pillow massacre. On the sixth of May, however, the Committ
tention of the Committee to the condition of returned Union prisoners, with the request that the Committee would immediately proceed to Annapolis and examine with their own eyes the condition of those who have been returned from rebel captivity. The Committee resolved that they would comply with the request of the Secretary of War on the first opportunity. The fifth of May was devoted by the Committee to concluding their labors upon the investigation of the Fort Pillow massacre. On the sixth of May, however, the Committee proceeded to Annapolis and Baltimore, and examined the condition of our returned soldiers, and took the testimony of several of them, together with the testimony of surgeons and other persons in attendance upon the hospitals. That testimony, with the communication of the Secretary of War, and the report of Colonel Hoffman, is herewith transmitted. The evidence proves, beyond all manner of doubt, a determination on the part of the rebel authorities, deliberately
March 24th (search for this): chapter 2
n a while a little piece of meat. Question. How often did they give you meat? Answer. May be once a day; may be once a week — just as they happened to have it. Question. Did you get enough to eat, such as it was? Answer. No, sir; I did not even get enough corn-bread. Question. How long were you on the island? Answer. I was on the island only a month, and in the hospital three months. Question. How long is it since you were exchanged? Answer. I came here on the twenty-fourth of March. Question. There were others with you on the island? Answer. Yes, sir. Question. How did they fare? Answer. The same as I did; we all fared alike. Question. Were any others frozen? Answer. Yes, sir; plenty of them frozen to death. Question, Frozen to death? Answer. Yes, sir. Question. Were their blankets taken away like yours? Answer. Yes, sir; they had to lie out in the open ditch. They did not have as good over them as I had Question. Did not they
e rebel authorities, I would very respectfully urge that retaliatory measures be at once instituted by subjecting the officers we now hold as prisoners of war to a similar treatment. I took advantage of the opportunity which this visit to Annapolis gave me to make a hasty inspection of Camp Parole, and I am happy to report that I found it in every branch in a most commendable condition. The men all seemed to be cheerful and in fine health, and the police inside and out was excellent. Colonel Root, the commanding officer, deserves much credit for the very satisfactory condition to which he has brought his command. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. Hoffman, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary General of Prisoners. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C. Testimony. Annapolis, Maryland, May 6, 1864. Howard Leedom, sworn and examined: by the Chairman: Question. To what company and regiment have you belonged? Answer
May 3rd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 2
aled. There appears to have been a deliberate system of savage and barbarous treatment and starvation, the result of which will be that few, if any, of the prisoners that have been in their hands during the past winter will ever again be in a condition to render any service, or even to enjoy life. Your obedient servant, Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Hon. B. F. Wade, Chairman of Joint Committee on Conduct of the War. office of Commissary General of prisoners, Washington, D. C., May 3, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report that, pursuant to your instructions of the second instant, I proceeded, yesterday morning, to Annapolis, with a view to see that the paroled prisoners about to arrive there from Richmond were properly received and cared for. The flag-of-truce boat New-York, under the charge of Major Mulford, with thirty-two officers, three hundred and sixty-three enlisted men, and one citizen on board, reached the wharf at the Naval School hospital about ten o'clock.
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