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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 110
Doc. 107.-address of the Virginia Assembly. Soldiers of Virginia in the Armies of the Confederate States: It is now nearly three years since you left your homes and firesides at the call of your State to repel the invasion of her soil. Before taking up arms, every effort to obtain the peaceful enjoyment of your rights under the Constitution had been exhausted, your appeals for justice spurned with contempt, and a war to subjugate our sister States of the South commenced by Abraham Lincoln. By this lawless proceeding, the Federal Administration threw off the mask it had hitherto worn. In such a contest, Virginia could not remain an indifferent spectator. Bound by every tie of blood, sympathy, common interests, and common wrongs, to the States against which this hostile preparation was set on foot, she withdrew at once from an association which no longer respected a written Constitution, and resolved to receive on her own bosom the threatened shock of invasion. She invo
baffled cupidity. But for this master passion of their nature, an honorable and speedy peace would be easy. The war has fully developed all the purposes, and you now know the fate that awaits you in the event of subjugation. Your liberties will utterly perish. Your State organization will be blotted out. All your property of every description will be confiscated; for all of us have participated in the revolution. Your lands will be divided out among the banditti from the North and from Europe, who have invaded our State. A free negro population will be established in your midst, who will be your social equals and military governors. Negro guards will, at their pleasure, give you passes' and safe conducts, or arrest you, to be tried and punished by negro commandants and magistrates. And to these, yourselves, your wives and children will be menial laborers and slaves, except those of you whom the malice of your enemies shall reserve for the dungeon or the gallows. Such is the d
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 110
ve ruthlessly invaded the sanctity of the grave and outraged the sensibilities of the living. Under the hypocritical guise of liberating from slavery a population happier and more virtuous than themselves, they have sought to subject us to a yoke more galling than they have essayed to remove. Within a few days past an expedition has been projected, and an abortive effort made to carry into execution, with minute instructions emanating (as we have reason to believe) from the Government at Washington, to sack and fire the city of Richmond, and in the darkness of the night to consign its inhabitants, without a moment's warning, to flames and to death. For this purpose, a special burning party was organized, provided with implements of destruction, and orders to carry into execution the fell design. Among its blazing ruins, the released prisoners from Belle Isle and the Libby were to unite with the bands of Dahlgren and Kilpatrick in dealing out death and slaughter upon unoffending and
Belle Isle, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
effort made to carry into execution, with minute instructions emanating (as we have reason to believe) from the Government at Washington, to sack and fire the city of Richmond, and in the darkness of the night to consign its inhabitants, without a moment's warning, to flames and to death. For this purpose, a special burning party was organized, provided with implements of destruction, and orders to carry into execution the fell design. Among its blazing ruins, the released prisoners from Belle Isle and the Libby were to unite with the bands of Dahlgren and Kilpatrick in dealing out death and slaughter upon unoffending and peaceful citizens, and inflicting outrage upon pure and unprotected women more horrible than death. The heart sickens at the contemplation of the enormities that would have been committed had the nefarious scheme succeeded. No prayer for mercy would have been heard, no scream for help would have been heeded. Fire, rapine, slaughter, and lust would have held und
Andrew Hunter (search for this): chapter 110
fugee to his home. The quiet of thriving villages, when the old man on his crutch and the brave and war-worn veteran with his armless sleeve, shall tell of bloody battles and scenes of privation to smiling children around him. The quiet of prosperous cities, whose wharves shall whiten with an opulent commerce, whose shops shall hum with a busy industry, and whose spires point to that haven of rest which is far away. Then from a thousand happy hearts and happy homes shall arise thanksgiving and praise to the God of battles as of grace, while tears of gratitude will embalm the memories and bedew the graves of the brave men whose blood has been shed as a libation to liberty. A. D. Dickinson, Chairman, A. J. Marshall, Andrew Hunter, Senate Committee, B. H. Shackleford, Chairman, R. W. Hunter, F. B. Deane, A. C. Cummings, R. H. Baker, House Committee. Adopted by Senate, March 5, 1864. Shelton C. Davis, C. S. Adopted by House of Delegates, March 9, 1864. Wm. F. Gordon, C. H. D.
and happy homes shall arise thanksgiving and praise to the God of battles as of grace, while tears of gratitude will embalm the memories and bedew the graves of the brave men whose blood has been shed as a libation to liberty. A. D. Dickinson, Chairman, A. J. Marshall, Andrew Hunter, Senate Committee, B. H. Shackleford, Chairman, R. W. Hunter, F. B. Deane, A. C. Cummings, R. H. Baker, House Committee. Adopted by Senate, March 5, 1864. Shelton C. Davis, C. S. Adopted by House of Delegat praise to the God of battles as of grace, while tears of gratitude will embalm the memories and bedew the graves of the brave men whose blood has been shed as a libation to liberty. A. D. Dickinson, Chairman, A. J. Marshall, Andrew Hunter, Senate Committee, B. H. Shackleford, Chairman, R. W. Hunter, F. B. Deane, A. C. Cummings, R. H. Baker, House Committee. Adopted by Senate, March 5, 1864. Shelton C. Davis, C. S. Adopted by House of Delegates, March 9, 1864. Wm. F. Gordon, C. H. D.
B. H. Shackleford (search for this): chapter 110
fugee to his home. The quiet of thriving villages, when the old man on his crutch and the brave and war-worn veteran with his armless sleeve, shall tell of bloody battles and scenes of privation to smiling children around him. The quiet of prosperous cities, whose wharves shall whiten with an opulent commerce, whose shops shall hum with a busy industry, and whose spires point to that haven of rest which is far away. Then from a thousand happy hearts and happy homes shall arise thanksgiving and praise to the God of battles as of grace, while tears of gratitude will embalm the memories and bedew the graves of the brave men whose blood has been shed as a libation to liberty. A. D. Dickinson, Chairman, A. J. Marshall, Andrew Hunter, Senate Committee, B. H. Shackleford, Chairman, R. W. Hunter, F. B. Deane, A. C. Cummings, R. H. Baker, House Committee. Adopted by Senate, March 5, 1864. Shelton C. Davis, C. S. Adopted by House of Delegates, March 9, 1864. Wm. F. Gordon, C. H. D.
R. H. Baker (search for this): chapter 110
fugee to his home. The quiet of thriving villages, when the old man on his crutch and the brave and war-worn veteran with his armless sleeve, shall tell of bloody battles and scenes of privation to smiling children around him. The quiet of prosperous cities, whose wharves shall whiten with an opulent commerce, whose shops shall hum with a busy industry, and whose spires point to that haven of rest which is far away. Then from a thousand happy hearts and happy homes shall arise thanksgiving and praise to the God of battles as of grace, while tears of gratitude will embalm the memories and bedew the graves of the brave men whose blood has been shed as a libation to liberty. A. D. Dickinson, Chairman, A. J. Marshall, Andrew Hunter, Senate Committee, B. H. Shackleford, Chairman, R. W. Hunter, F. B. Deane, A. C. Cummings, R. H. Baker, House Committee. Adopted by Senate, March 5, 1864. Shelton C. Davis, C. S. Adopted by House of Delegates, March 9, 1864. Wm. F. Gordon, C. H. D.
A. C. Cummings (search for this): chapter 110
ugee to his home. The quiet of thriving villages, when the old man on his crutch and the brave and war-worn veteran with his armless sleeve, shall tell of bloody battles and scenes of privation to smiling children around him. The quiet of prosperous cities, whose wharves shall whiten with an opulent commerce, whose shops shall hum with a busy industry, and whose spires point to that haven of rest which is far away. Then from a thousand happy hearts and happy homes shall arise thanksgiving and praise to the God of battles as of grace, while tears of gratitude will embalm the memories and bedew the graves of the brave men whose blood has been shed as a libation to liberty. A. D. Dickinson, Chairman, A. J. Marshall, Andrew Hunter, Senate Committee, B. H. Shackleford, Chairman, R. W. Hunter, F. B. Deane, A. C. Cummings, R. H. Baker, House Committee. Adopted by Senate, March 5, 1864. Shelton C. Davis, C. S. Adopted by House of Delegates, March 9, 1864. Wm. F. Gordon, C. H. D.
A. J. Marshall (search for this): chapter 110
ugee to his home. The quiet of thriving villages, when the old man on his crutch and the brave and war-worn veteran with his armless sleeve, shall tell of bloody battles and scenes of privation to smiling children around him. The quiet of prosperous cities, whose wharves shall whiten with an opulent commerce, whose shops shall hum with a busy industry, and whose spires point to that haven of rest which is far away. Then from a thousand happy hearts and happy homes shall arise thanksgiving and praise to the God of battles as of grace, while tears of gratitude will embalm the memories and bedew the graves of the brave men whose blood has been shed as a libation to liberty. A. D. Dickinson, Chairman, A. J. Marshall, Andrew Hunter, Senate Committee, B. H. Shackleford, Chairman, R. W. Hunter, F. B. Deane, A. C. Cummings, R. H. Baker, House Committee. Adopted by Senate, March 5, 1864. Shelton C. Davis, C. S. Adopted by House of Delegates, March 9, 1864. Wm. F. Gordon, C. H. D.
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