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St. Paul (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
I am especially obliged to Lieutenant E. Champlin, Acting Adjutant; Sergeant-Major Akers, Quartermaster Sergeant H. D. Pettibone, and First Sergeant C. D. Bevans, who, I lament to say, was killed; also First Sergeant James M. Moran, company H, and, in short, to all the officers and men of the regiment, for their promptitude in obeying all orders. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Everett W. Foster, Major Third Minnesota, commanding Regiment. St. Paul Pioneer account. St. Paul, April 16. In conversation with Captain Devereux, of the Third regiment, who has just returned from Little Rock, Arkansas, we were favored with the following particulars of the recent fight at Fitzhugh's Woods, near Augusta, in North-Eastern Arkansas. On Wednesday, the thirtieth ultimo, the Third regiment was on duty at Little Rock, in Arkansas. At five P. M. it received orders from Colonel (now General) Andrews, commanding the post, to be prepared to march in one hour. At halfpast s
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
In conversation with Captain Devereux, of the Third regiment, who has just returned from Little Rock, Arkansas, we were favored with the following particulars of the recent fight at Fitzhugh's Woods,tern Arkansas. On Wednesday, the thirtieth ultimo, the Third regiment was on duty at Little Rock, in Arkansas. At five P. M. it received orders from Colonel (now General) Andrews, commanding the powo thirds through the twisted folds, just above his stomach. It was understood, at leaving Little Rock, that the object of the expedition was to relieve Batesville, an outpost on White River, thrennesota infantry, and fifty of the Eighth Missouri cavalry, under Colonel C. C. Andrews, left Little Rock at eight P. M. of the thirtieth ultimo, reached Duvall's Bluff at four o'clock next morning, freedom, giving three cheers for the flag and three for Colonel Andrews. We were away from Little Rock three days, travelled three hundred and twenty miles, chased McRay's boasted band of eight hu
Cache River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
rain, it was ascertained that McCrea had left that country and gone toward Jacksonport. Upon getting this information, we immediately returned to the boat, and proceeded up the river to Augusta, where we arrived at half-past 5 A. M., on the first of April; disembarked, and pushed without delay, with one hundred and sixty men, all told, into the country, on the Jacksonport road, the cavalry in advance. My orders were to keep within supporting distance, which I did. At the crossing of the Cache River road, four miles from Augusta, I encamped with the cavalry, which had been skirmishing with the enemy for the last two miles, and here found them in force. The Colonel ordered me to take three companies into the woods and engage them. I took companies B, H, and I, and drove the enemy before me about one mile, and across a large cypress-swamp. I afterward learned from prisoners that the force. I drove was the notorious Rutherford and about one hundred and fifty men. At this time the re
Napoleon (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
e fight one of the men found a very large bullet imbedded in his blanket, having passed two thirds through the twisted folds, just above his stomach. It was understood, at leaving Little Rock, that the object of the expedition was to relieve Batesville, an outpost on White River, threatened by McRae's force, or to divert McRae's attention from that post for the time. Missouri Democrat account. little Rock, Ark., April 6, 1864. A force of one hundred and fifty of the Third Minnesot moved in the dark toward the understood locality of the rebel McRay's camp, five miles distant. After fording the muddy branch of White River, we learned that Ray and his band had gone up the river to attack our transports then on their way to Batesville. Returning to our boat, we reached Augusta and landed at sunrise; then took up our line of march on the Jacksonport road, having learned that the enemy was posted in strong force near it. Less than a mile ahead, we discovered McRay's advance
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
Doc. 128.-battle of Fitzhugh's woods, Ark. Report of Major Foster. headquarters Third Minnesota Volunteer infantry, little Rock, Ark., April 3, 1864. Captain John Peetz, Post-Adjutant, Little Rock: Captain: I have the honor to report the part which the detachment of the Third Minnesota volunteers, under my command, took in the recent expedition and action up White River, under command of Colonel C. C. Andrews, of the Third Minnesota. I received orders from Colonel Andrews at halt. Paul, April 16. In conversation with Captain Devereux, of the Third regiment, who has just returned from Little Rock, Arkansas, we were favored with the following particulars of the recent fight at Fitzhugh's Woods, near Augusta, in North-Eastern Arkansas. On Wednesday, the thirtieth ultimo, the Third regiment was on duty at Little Rock, in Arkansas. At five P. M. it received orders from Colonel (now General) Andrews, commanding the post, to be prepared to march in one hour. At halfpas
White River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
which the detachment of the Third Minnesota volunteers, under my command, took in the recent expedition and action up White River, under command of Colonel C. C. Andrews, of the Third Minnesota. I received orders from Colonel Andrews at half-pased on the steamer Dove, and at seven o'clock, together with a small force of the Eighth Missouri cavalry, proceeded up White River, reaching Gregory's Landing — which is ten miles above the mouth of the Little Red, and one hundred and ten miles abovEstes--the whole under command of General Andrews--was embarked at Duval's Bluff on the steamer Dove, and proceeded up White River, convoyed by gunboat No. Twenty-five, of the Mosquito Fleet. At Gregory's Landing, sixty-five miles from the Bluff, e dark toward the understood locality of the rebel McRay's camp, five miles distant. After fording the muddy branch of White River, we learned that Ray and his band had gone up the river to attack our transports then on their way to Batesville. R
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
ed to the boat, and proceeded up the river to Augusta, where we arrived at half-past 5 A. M., on thsing of the Cache River road, four miles from Augusta, I encamped with the cavalry, which had been e out of the woods, we again proceeded toward Augusta. We marched on about two and a half miles, toccupy some farm-buildings up the road toward Augusta, and protect the crossing of Cypress Swamp, aof the recent fight at Fitzhugh's Woods, near Augusta, in North-Eastern Arkansas. On Wednesday, ed to the boat, and proceeded up the river to Augusta, reaching that place at about daylight of Fris information, resolved to leave the boats at Augusta, and march into the country; and did so marche citizens along the line of our march, as at Augusta, all professed to know nothing of McRae or hi Near the battle-field, about five miles from Augusta, the column had to make its way on the road tesville. Returning to our boat, we reached Augusta and landed at sunrise; then took up our line [5 more...]
Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
Sergeant slightly on the side of his forehead. The men wore their blankets rolled and twisted, the ends tied together, and the coil thus made thrown over the head, and hanging on the left shoulder and right side. After the fight one of the men found a very large bullet imbedded in his blanket, having passed two thirds through the twisted folds, just above his stomach. It was understood, at leaving Little Rock, that the object of the expedition was to relieve Batesville, an outpost on White River, threatened by McRae's force, or to divert McRae's attention from that post for the time. Missouri Democrat account. little Rock, Ark., April 6, 1864. A force of one hundred and fifty of the Third Minnesota infantry, and fifty of the Eighth Missouri cavalry, under Colonel C. C. Andrews, left Little Rock at eight P. M. of the thirtieth ultimo, reached Duvall's Bluff at four o'clock next morning, and embarked on the steamer Dove. With the iron-clad No. 25 we reached Gregory's L
Jacksonport (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
n the darkness and rain, it was ascertained that McCrea had left that country and gone toward Jacksonport. Upon getting this information, we immediately returned to the boat, and proceeded up the ri and pushed without delay, with one hundred and sixty men, all told, into the country, on the Jacksonport road, the cavalry in advance. My orders were to keep within supporting distance, which I didorce came up, the cavalry advanced, and I followed, crossing the swamp, and proceeding toward Jacksonport, the cavalry doing the skirmishing. We marched on to the Methodist church, near Dr. Westmore to our boat, we reached Augusta and landed at sunrise; then took up our line of march on the Jacksonport road, having learned that the enemy was posted in strong force near it. Less than a mile aheasposition to stand, but soon dispersed in the woods. We followed McRay twelve miles over the Jacksonport road, and then, learning nothing more of him, started back near night for our boats. We had
Canuck (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
Doc. 128.-battle of Fitzhugh's woods, Ark. Report of Major Foster. headquarters Third Minnesota Volunteer infantry, little Rock, Ark., April 3, 1864. Captain John Peetz, Post-Adjutant, Little Rock: Captain: I have the honor to report the part which the detachment of the Third Minnesota volunteers, under my command, took in the recent expedition and action up White River, under command of Colonel C. C. Andrews, of the Third Minnesota. I received orders from Colonel Andrews at hal at leaving Little Rock, that the object of the expedition was to relieve Batesville, an outpost on White River, threatened by McRae's force, or to divert McRae's attention from that post for the time. Missouri Democrat account. little Rock, Ark., April 6, 1864. A force of one hundred and fifty of the Third Minnesota infantry, and fifty of the Eighth Missouri cavalry, under Colonel C. C. Andrews, left Little Rock at eight P. M. of the thirtieth ultimo, reached Duvall's Bluff at four
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