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Charleston, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
toward Dalton, crossing the ridge three miles north of the place known as Tunnel Hill, with my infantry and one section of artillery, the latter under command of Lieutenant Stansbury. I passed the first and second ridges to a road running south on the eastern base of the latter, along the road to Neil's farm, six miles from Dalton. At this point I made a junction with Colonel Long, in command of six hundred cavalry. He was in position, and skirmishing with the enemy. He had left Charleston, Tennessee, passed around on Spring-Place road, thence west by Varnell's Station to the position at which I found him. Neils farm is six miles north-west of Dalton, and three miles north of the Chattanooga and Dalton Railroad. We both advanced on the wagon-road south, toward Glaze's house, at the railroad. The ridge to our right at this place, (Neil's house,) soon changes to south-east, and continues that direction until it passes beyond Davis's house, at the western base of the ridge, at wh
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
Doc. 140.-operations around Dalton, Ga. Colonel Grose's report. headquarters Third brigade, First diken by this brigade in the recent seven days before Dalton. I was ordered by the Division Commander, and macommanding the division, to move on the road toward Dalton, and, if possible, find the enemy. I advanced threion. I was here directed to move south-east toward Dalton, crossing the ridge three miles north of the place tter, along the road to Neil's farm, six miles from Dalton. At this point I made a junction with Colonel LongI found him. Neils farm is six miles north-west of Dalton, and three miles north of the Chattanooga and Daltorailroad, at a point three miles north of west from Dalton, and at a point one and a half miles east of the gosition of forces during the reconnaissance near Dalton, Georgia. February, 1864. advanced, Colonel Long takingay before. With ten thousand more men on our left, Dalton, no doubt, would have fallen an easy prey to our ar
Blue Springs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
Doc. 140.-operations around Dalton, Ga. Colonel Grose's report. headquarters Third brigade, First division, Fourth army corps, Blue Springs, tens., February 29, 1864. Major W. H. Sinclair, A. A.G. First Division: sir: I have the honor to report the part taken by this brigade in the recent seven days before Dalton. I was ordered by the Division Commander, and marched to take part in the reconnaissance toward the enemy from this place, on the morning of the twenty-second of February, 1864, with the Eighty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Waters, Seventy-fifth Illinois, Colonel Bennett, Thirty-sixth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Carey, Thirtieth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Hind, Eightieth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Kilgour, and Twenty-Fourth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Cockerill, with battery H, Fourth U. S. artillery, Lieutenant Heilman; effective force, officers and men, including battery, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six. My brigade having the advance, and the Thirty-
Rocky Face Ridge (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
ough which a creek flows to the west, south of which the ridge bears to the west of south one and a fourth miles to the railroad, at a point three miles north of west from Dalton, and at a point one and a half miles east of the gorge through Rocky-Face Ridge, or Buzzard's Roost, forming a valley east of Rocky Face Ridge about one and a half miles wide, running from Davis's house south to the railroad a like distance. We steadily Map showing relative position of forces during the reconnaissanRocky Face Ridge about one and a half miles wide, running from Davis's house south to the railroad a like distance. We steadily Map showing relative position of forces during the reconnaissance near Dalton, Georgia. February, 1864. advanced, Colonel Long taking the lead; drove the enemy from all the ridge north of the creek. Upon entering the valley, Colonel Long's command passed to the right, alone the base of the ridge, to the west. The Eighty-fourth and Seventy-fifth Illinois infantry were moved forward in the valley on the left of the cavalry, covering the slope of the eastern ridge with skirmishers, thrown forward and to the left to cover the ridge and flank of the line. Th
Catoosa Springs (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
nding the division, to move on the road toward Dalton, and, if possible, find the enemy. I advanced three miles to Wade's farm, and found the enemy's pickets, drove them, and directed Captain Van Antwerp, with his company of Fourth Michigan cavalry, to pursue them, which he did promptly, one and a half miles. Upon the cavalry rejoining the brigade, we returned to Red Clay and rested for the night. February 23d. Marched with the division via Dr. Lee's house twelve miles, to near Catoosa Springs, Georgia, to make a junction with Fourteenth corps; arrived there about nine o'clock P. M. February 24th. Marched back east to Dr. Lee's house, with division. I was here directed to move south-east toward Dalton, crossing the ridge three miles north of the place known as Tunnel Hill, with my infantry and one section of artillery, the latter under command of Lieutenant Stansbury. I passed the first and second ridges to a road running south on the eastern base of the latter, along the ro
Tunnel Hill (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
Fourteenth corps; arrived there about nine o'clock P. M. February 24th. Marched back east to Dr. Lee's house, with division. I was here directed to move south-east toward Dalton, crossing the ridge three miles north of the place known as Tunnel Hill, with my infantry and one section of artillery, the latter under command of Lieutenant Stansbury. I passed the first and second ridges to a road running south on the eastern base of the latter, along the road to Neil's farm, six miles from Dath ten thousand more men on our left, Dalton, no doubt, would have fallen an easy prey to our arms. At night, the object of the reconnoissance being ended, we were ordered, and, with the division, retired to Dr. Lee's farm, on the west of the Tunnel Hill range of ridges, and three miles north of that place. February 26th. At about nine o'clock A. M., I moved my command south-east one mile, on to the ridge two miles north of the Tunnel, threw out some skirmishers on the eastern slope, met s
Stevenson (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
e railroad, the command of Colonel Long driving the rebel infantry out of their camps immediately at the road. We continued in this position, skirmishing in front, for some time, when lines of the enemy's infantry commenced an advance upon us. A few well-directed rounds from the section of artillery, with the aid of a heavy skirmish-line, brought them to a halt and put them under cover. It was now near night, and learning from prisoners that Stewart's rebel division was in our front, and Stevenson's near by, and not knowing that it was possible to have any assistance during the night, at dusk I withdrew the forces, leaving the cavalry and Eightieth Illinois infantry at Neil's farm, and retired the residue to widow Burk's house, reported the facts, and rested for the night. February 25th. At early day Brigadier-General Cruft, division commander, promptly came up with the other two brigades, and by his orders all moved forward to Neil's farm, the enemy having reoccupied the ridge
rested for the night. February 23d. Marched with the division via Dr. Lee's house twelve miles, to near Catoosa Springs, Georgia, to make a junction with Fourteenth corps; arrived there about nine o'clock P. M. February 24th. Marched back east to Dr. Lee's house, with division. I was here directed to move south-east toward Dalton, crossing the ridge three miles north of the place known as Tunnel Hill, with my infantry and one section of artillery, the latter under command of Lieutenant Stansbury. I passed the first and second ridges to a road running south on the eastern base of the latter, along the road to Neil's farm, six miles from Dalton. At this point I made a junction with Colonel Long, in command of six hundred cavalry. He was in position, and skirmishing with the enemy. He had left Charleston, Tennessee, passed around on Spring-Place road, thence west by Varnell's Station to the position at which I found him. Neils farm is six miles north-west of Dalton, and thr
he latter under command of Lieutenant Stansbury. I passed the first and second ridges to a road running south on the eastern base of the latter, along the road to Neil's farm, six miles from Dalton. At this point I made a junction with Colonel Long, in command of six hundred cavalry. He was in position, and skirmishing with theand not knowing that it was possible to have any assistance during the night, at dusk I withdrew the forces, leaving the cavalry and Eightieth Illinois infantry at Neil's farm, and retired the residue to widow Burk's house, reported the facts, and rested for the night. February 25th. At early day Brigadier-General Cruft, division commander, promptly came up with the other two brigades, and by his orders all moved forward to Neil's farm, the enemy having reoccupied the ridge where the road passes over toward Davis's house, and for near a mile to the north. Our lines were soon formed, my brigade on the ridge to the right, covering the summit and extendi
lery, Lieutenant Heilman; effective force, officers and men, including battery, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six. My brigade having the advance, and the Thirty-sixth Indiana marching in front, we marched toward Red Clay, or Council-ground, on the Georgia State-line, a distance of eight miles; arrived there at half-past 12 P. M. I was there ordered by the General commanding the division, to move on the road toward Dalton, and, if possible, find the enemy. I advanced three miles to Wade's farm, and found the enemy's pickets, drove them, and directed Captain Van Antwerp, with his company of Fourth Michigan cavalry, to pursue them, which he did promptly, one and a half miles. Upon the cavalry rejoining the brigade, we returned to Red Clay and rested for the night. February 23d. Marched with the division via Dr. Lee's house twelve miles, to near Catoosa Springs, Georgia, to make a junction with Fourteenth corps; arrived there about nine o'clock P. M. February 24th. Marc
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