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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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n our own, I beg leave to call your attention to the following extracts from private letters recently found on the prize steamer Ceres, which plainly show that all such statements are fictions: Captain Maffit, in a letter to Mr. Lamar, dated Liverpool, October, says: The news from blockade-runners is decidedly bad. Six of the last boats have recently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in a letter to their correspondents in Charleston, dated December second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibraltar. Captain Ridgely, senior naval officer off Wilmington, reports, under date of the tenth instant, that but one vessel has succeeded in getting in, to the knowledge of any of the blockading vessels, and that on the night of the tenth instant. She was fired at and hit several times by the Howqua and
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
f the Navy: sir: In reference to the excessive running of the blockade off Wilmington, as reported in the rebel journals, and copied in our own, I beg leave to calecently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in ecember second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibraltar. Captain Ridgely, senior naval officer off Wilmington, reports, under date of the tenth instant, that but one vessel has succeeded in getting in, to the knowledge of any of the blockading vessels, and says that: The newspaper paragraph stating that seventeen vessels arrived in Wilmington in one night, is entirely destitute of truth. Such reports are, doubtless, pir names very often, for the same purpose. Each vessel on the blockade off Wilmington sends to me here a carefully prepared abstract from the log for the month, in
Liverpool (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ral Lee's report. flag-ship Minnesota, Newport news, Va., December 21, 1863. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: In reference to the excessive running of the blockade off Wilmington, as reported in the rebel journals, and copied in our own, I beg leave to call your attention to the following extracts from private letters recently found on the prize steamer Ceres, which plainly show that all such statements are fictions: Captain Maffit, in a letter to Mr. Lamar, dated Liverpool, October, says: The news from blockade-runners is decidedly bad. Six of the last boats have recently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in a letter to their correspondents in Charleston, dated December second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibraltar. Captain Ridgely, senior naval officer off Wilmin
Charleston, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
llowing extracts from private letters recently found on the prize steamer Ceres, which plainly show that all such statements are fictions: Captain Maffit, in a letter to Mr. Lamar, dated Liverpool, October, says: The news from blockade-runners is decidedly bad. Six of the last boats have recently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in a letter to their correspondents in Charleston, dated December second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibraltar. Captain Ridgely, senior naval officer off Wilmington, reports, under date of the tenth instant, that but one vessel has succeeded in getting in, to the knowledge of any of the blockading vessels, and that on the night of the tenth instant. She was fired at and hit several times by the Howqua and Britannia. Also, under date of the seventeenth, Captain
Doc. 27.-the efficiency of the blockade. Rear-Admiral Lee's report. flag-ship Minnesota, Newport news, Va., December 21, 1863. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: In reference to the excessive running of the blockade off Wilmington, as reported in the rebel journals, and copied in our own, I beg leave to call your attention to the following extracts from private letters recently found on the prize steamer Ceres, which plainly show that all such statements are fictions: Captain Maffit, in a letter to Mr. Lamar, dated Liverpool, October, says: The news from blockade-runners is decidedly bad. Six of the last boats have recently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in a letter to their correspondents in Charleston, dated December second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibral
ade. Rear-Admiral Lee's report. flag-ship Minnesota, Newport news, Va., December 21, 1863. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: In reference to the excessive running of the blockade off Wilmington, as reported in the rebel journals, and copied in our own, I beg leave to call your attention to the following extracts from private letters recently found on the prize steamer Ceres, which plainly show that all such statements are fictions: Captain Maffit, in a letter to Mr. Lamar, dated Liverpool, October, says: The news from blockade-runners is decidedly bad. Six of the last boats have recently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in a letter to their correspondents in Charleston, dated December second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibraltar. Captain Ridgely, senior naval o
A. R. Admiral (search for this): chapter 29
the knowledge of any of the blockading vessels, and that on the night of the tenth instant. She was fired at and hit several times by the Howqua and Britannia. Also, under date of the seventeenth, Captain Ridgely says that: The newspaper paragraph stating that seventeen vessels arrived in Wilmington in one night, is entirely destitute of truth. Such reports are, doubtless, published to encourage the shipment of crews for the large numbers of vessels recently purchased for blockade-running, as they have been very roughly handled of late. The blockade-runners change their names very often, for the same purpose. Each vessel on the blockade off Wilmington sends to me here a carefully prepared abstract from the log for the month, in which every movement is actually recorded, and it is evident from: a comparison of such abstracts, that the reports are entirely unfounded. I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully yours, S. P. Lee, A. R. Admiral Commanding N. A. B. Squadron.
the knowledge of any of the blockading vessels, and that on the night of the tenth instant. She was fired at and hit several times by the Howqua and Britannia. Also, under date of the seventeenth, Captain Ridgely says that: The newspaper paragraph stating that seventeen vessels arrived in Wilmington in one night, is entirely destitute of truth. Such reports are, doubtless, published to encourage the shipment of crews for the large numbers of vessels recently purchased for blockade-running, as they have been very roughly handled of late. The blockade-runners change their names very often, for the same purpose. Each vessel on the blockade off Wilmington sends to me here a carefully prepared abstract from the log for the month, in which every movement is actually recorded, and it is evident from: a comparison of such abstracts, that the reports are entirely unfounded. I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully yours, S. P. Lee, A. R. Admiral Commanding N. A. B. Squadron.
William P. Campbell (search for this): chapter 29
nals, and copied in our own, I beg leave to call your attention to the following extracts from private letters recently found on the prize steamer Ceres, which plainly show that all such statements are fictions: Captain Maffit, in a letter to Mr. Lamar, dated Liverpool, October, says: The news from blockade-runners is decidedly bad. Six of the last boats have recently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in a letter to their correspondents in Charleston, dated December second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibraltar. Captain Ridgely, senior naval officer off Wilmington, reports, under date of the tenth instant, that but one vessel has succeeded in getting in, to the knowledge of any of the blockading vessels, and that on the night of the tenth instant. She was fired at and hit several times
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 29
Doc. 27.-the efficiency of the blockade. Rear-Admiral Lee's report. flag-ship Minnesota, Newport news, Va., December 21, 1863. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: In reference to the excessive running of the blockade off Wilmington, as reported in the rebel journals, and copied in our own, I beg leave to call your attention to the following extracts from private letters recently found on the prize steamer Ceres, which plainly show that all such statements are fictions: Captain Maffit, in a letter to Mr. Lamar, dated Liverpool, October, says: The news from blockade-runners is decidedly bad. Six of the last boats have recently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in a letter to their correspondents in Charleston, dated December second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibralt
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