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g seventeen (17) and capturing twelve, (12,) besides twenty horses and mules. Another force, under Colonel O'Connell, succeeded in killing twenty-three, (23.) and capturing forty of this same gang. Colonel Stokes ascertained that, when concentrated, the guerrillas in that section of the country will number six hundred men, finely mounted. A scout also brought me information of an attack by Roddy, with a heavy force, upon our troops stationed at Lebanon, De Kalb County, Alabama, on the third instant. The rebels were repulsed, and driven in confusion towards Gadsden, when, learning that Roddy was being reenforced by Wheeler, our troops withdrew to Sand Mountain, taking possession of Saltpetre Cave, near Fort Paine. About the tenth instant, various reports having been received that the enemy under Johnson had weakened his force by sending reenforcements to Polk, then opposing the advance of our forces under General Sherman; also that he had sent troops to aid Longstreet, in East-T
, learning that Roddy was being reenforced by Wheeler, our troops withdrew to Sand Mountain, taking possession of Saltpetre Cave, near Fort Paine. About the tenth instant, various reports having been received that the enemy under Johnson had weakened his force by sending reenforcements to Polk, then opposing the advance of our fthe Commanding General of the military division, effectually to clear out the rebel army directly opposed to our forces at Knoxville, I received orders, on the tenth instant, to prepare to start for Knoxville on the thirteenth, with such force as could safely be spared from the protection of Chattanooga and its communications, to c placed in position at Cleveland, in reserve. On the fourteenth, I received a communication from General Grant, countermanding the orders he had given me on the tenth, to proceed with a force from my command, to East-Tennessee, and stating that, from a conversation he had had with General Foster, he (General Grant) was convinced
; and it being the desire of the Commanding General of the military division, effectually to clear out the rebel army directly opposed to our forces at Knoxville, I received orders, on the tenth instant, to prepare to start for Knoxville on the thirteenth, with such force as could safely be spared from the protection of Chattanooga and its communications, to cooperate with the army of the Ohio in driving Longstreet from East-Tennessee. The army at this period had been very much weakened by the as in a very poor condition, notwithstanding all the efforts made to replace the animals lost by starvation, during the close investment of Chattanooga by the enemy; and for want of horses scarcely any of the artillery could be moved. On the thirteenth, the East-Tennessee and Georgia Railroad was in running order to Loudon. The same day Matthias's brigade, of the Fifteenth corps, (army of the Tennessee,) arrived at Chattanooga from Huntsville, in pursuance to orders from General Grant, and w
nd during that time killed four, (4,) wounded five or six, and captured fifteen, (15,) including a captain and lieutenant, thirty (30) horses, and twenty stand of arms. The Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, having been completed on the fourteenth instant, and trains running regularly from Nashville to this point, steps were immediately taken to commence repairing the East-Tennessee and Georgia Railroad. The First division of the Fourth corps, Major-General D. S. Stanley commanding, was ordon. The same day Matthias's brigade, of the Fifteenth corps, (army of the Tennessee,) arrived at Chattanooga from Huntsville, in pursuance to orders from General Grant, and was immediately placed in position at Cleveland, in reserve. On the fourteenth, I received a communication from General Grant, countermanding the orders he had given me on the tenth, to proceed with a force from my command, to East-Tennessee, and stating that, from a conversation he had had with General Foster, he (Genera
er, he immediately informed General Grant of these movements of the enemy, who directed me to organize an expedition at once, of sufficient force to drive Roddy away from where he was reported to be, and to destroy all boats and materials that might in any way be used by the enemy in crossing the Tennessee River. On the twenty-second, information was received that Johnson's and Morrow's brigades, of Roddy's command, had crossed the Tennessee, somewhere between Florence and Clifton, on the eighteenth, intending to make a raid on our railroads. The guards along the railroads were cautioned against an attack from this party, and measures were immediately taken to drive Roddy across the river. Colonel H. O. Miller, Seventy-second Indiana, commanding one expedition, reports from Blue Water, twenty-sixth, via Pulaski, twenty-seventh, that he engaged Johnson's brigade near Florence, routed them, killed fifteen, and wounded quite a number, taking them prisoners — among them three commission
nson's brigade near Florence, routed them, killed fifteen, and wounded quite a number, taking them prisoners — among them three commissioned officers; our loss, ten wounded. Brigadier-General Gillem also reports having sent out parties from along the line of the N. W. Railroad, and their having returned with Lieutenant-Colonel Brewer, two captains, three lieutenants, and twenty men as prisoners. A party of guerrillas, numbering about one hundred and fifty men, attacked Tracy City on the twentieth, and after having three times summoned the garrison to surrender, were handsomely repulsed by our forces. Colonel T. J. Harrison, Thirty-ninth Indiana, (mounted infantry,) reports from Cedar Grove, twenty-first instant, that he had sent an expedition of two hundred men to Sparta, to look after the guerrillas in that vicinity. They divided into five parties, concentrating at Sparta, having passed over the localities of Carter's, Champ Ferguson's, Bledsoe's, and Murray's guerrillas. His (
ving sent out parties from along the line of the N. W. Railroad, and their having returned with Lieutenant-Colonel Brewer, two captains, three lieutenants, and twenty men as prisoners. A party of guerrillas, numbering about one hundred and fifty men, attacked Tracy City on the twentieth, and after having three times summoned the garrison to surrender, were handsomely repulsed by our forces. Colonel T. J. Harrison, Thirty-ninth Indiana, (mounted infantry,) reports from Cedar Grove, twenty-first instant, that he had sent an expedition of two hundred men to Sparta, to look after the guerrillas in that vicinity. They divided into five parties, concentrating at Sparta, having passed over the localities of Carter's, Champ Ferguson's, Bledsoe's, and Murray's guerrillas. His (Harrison's) force remained on the Calf-Killer five days, and during that time killed four, (4,) wounded five or six, and captured fifteen, (15,) including a captain and lieutenant, thirty (30) horses, and twenty sta
ay from where he was reported to be, and to destroy all boats and materials that might in any way be used by the enemy in crossing the Tennessee River. On the twenty-second, information was received that Johnson's and Morrow's brigades, of Roddy's command, had crossed the Tennessee, somewhere between Florence and Clifton, on the ewith the above instructions, every thing being in readiness, Johnson's and Baird's divisions moved out from Chattanooga, and occupied Ringgold, Georgia, on the twenty-second, taking up a position on the ridge west of East-Chickamauga Creek, with two regiments of mounted infantry, Colonel Boone's Twenty-eighth Kentucky, and Colonel attempt to turn Crufts's left flank; and should the enemy retire, to notify Crufts, so that the latter might advance from Red Clay. During the evening of the twenty-second, General Palmer notified me from Ringgold that he had reliable information that Johnston had despatched Cheatham's and Cleburne's divisions to the relief of Po
d, observing well the movements of the enemy, so as to give timely warning of any attempt to turn Crufts's left flank; and should the enemy retire, to notify Crufts, so that the latter might advance from Red Clay. During the evening of the twenty-second, General Palmer notified me from Ringgold that he had reliable information that Johnston had despatched Cheatham's and Cleburne's divisions to the relief of Polk, in Alabama, who was falling back before General Sherman's column. On the twenty-third, Davis's division of the Fourteenth corps, closed up on the balance of General Palmer's command at Ringgold; Brigadier-General Matthias, commanding a brigade of the Fifteenth corps, stationed at Cleveland, in reserve, was directed to send six regiments from his command to reinforce General Crufts, at Red Clay; Colonel Long, having established communication with Crufts, the evening before, advanced with his brigade of cavalry along the Spring Place road, driving in the enemy's videttes whe
killed four, (4,) wounded five or six, and captured fifteen, (15,) including a captain and lieutenant, thirty (30) horses, and twenty stand of arms. The Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, having been completed on the fourteenth instant, and trains running regularly from Nashville to this point, steps were immediately taken to commence repairing the East-Tennessee and Georgia Railroad. The First division of the Fourth corps, Major-General D. S. Stanley commanding, was ordered, on the twenty-fourth, to take up a position north of Chattanooga, between Chickamauga Depot and the Hiawassee River, to protect the repairs on the railroad. General Hooker, commanding the Eleventh and Twelfth corps, was ordered to relieve Stanley's division, then stationed on the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, between Whitesides and Bridgeport. January twenty-eighth, Major-General J. M. Palmer, commanding Fourteenth army corps, with a portion of his command, made a reconnoissance toward the enemy's
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