hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 640 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 443 19 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 321 3 Browse Search
Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) 296 8 Browse Search
Doc 290 0 Browse Search
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) 278 8 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 276 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 267 3 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 256 0 Browse Search
N. B. Forrest 240 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 125 total hits in 40 results.

1 2 3 4
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Doc. 35.-siege of Cincinnati. Operations of the Black brigade. To His Excellency, John Brough, Governor of Ohio: I beg leave to present to you, for preservation in the archives of the State, the accompanying enrolment of the Black brigade of Cincinnati, serving in the defence of that city in September, 1862. This brigade was not formed under the authority of the State; but its labors were in the defence of her soil, and it seems but proper that some memory of it should be preseriscovered a special aptitude for camplife, and with grass, brush, and trees made Camp Lupton an agreeable summer residence. New accessions were received to the ranks every day; colored men, singly, in squads and companies, from every part of Southern Ohio, joining them, until the number exceeded seven hundred, independently of the details made for special duties. Upon the section assigned to them, they continued to labor until the twentieth. During this time they worked faithfully, always do
Newport, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
who for three weeks, as a separate and distinct force, labored upon the fortifications in the rear of Covington and Newport, Kentucky, opposite Cincinnati. The rank and file, and all the company officers except three, were colored men. There was noiam M. Dickson is hereby assigned to the command of the negro forces from Cincinnati, working on the fortifications near Newport and Covington, and will be obeyed accordingly. By order of Major-General Lew. Wallace. T. C. Elston, Jr., A. D. C. for duty. A number of them were detailed for special duties, and about five hundred marched with me across the river to Newport, and thence to the cemetery on the Alexandria road in the rear of Newport. A handsome national flag, presented to them Newport. A handsome national flag, presented to them by Captain James Lupton, was borne in their midst; and their march was enlivened by strains of martial music, proceeding from a band formed from the ranks of their own motion. They were cheered on the way to their work by the good words of the citi
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
s to an arduous and then thankless duty. It will not be considered by any of them an unfair discrimination, when I particularize in a single instance. To the constant attention, by day and by night, and to the discreet supervision of James Lupton, as camp commandant, the brigade was greatly indebted for its well-being and comfort. Many of the members of the brigade have since entered the military service. Many are there still. Some have fallen, and now sleep well amid the sands of Morris Island, and of the banks of the Mississippi; others have been taken prisoners, and their fate is enshrouded in impenetrable mystery. All have done their duty. It is to be regretted that they were not permitted to enter the service under the auspices of their own State, whose soil they had defended; but this privilege which the authorities of their State denied them, was granted them by the sagacious, patriotic, and noble Governor of the ancient commonwealth of Massachusetts. But there ha
Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ut the enrolment is complete as to the body of the brigade, who for three weeks, as a separate and distinct force, labored upon the fortifications in the rear of Covington and Newport, Kentucky, opposite Cincinnati. The rank and file, and all the company officers except three, were colored men. There was no complete military formannati, Sept. 4, 1862. William M. Dickson is hereby assigned to the command of the negro forces from Cincinnati, working on the fortifications near Newport and Covington, and will be obeyed accordingly. By order of Major-General Lew. Wallace. T. C. Elston, Jr., A. D. C. Upon assuming the command, September fourth, I organizthe fortifications where the colored forces were. I found them at work, on the rifle-pits and trenches about Fort Mitchel, on the Lexington road, in the rear of Covington. They had been faithfully laboring during the preceding night, and had already been commended by the engineer in charge for efficient work. They were, however,
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ll. Some have fallen, and now sleep well amid the sands of Morris Island, and of the banks of the Mississippi; others have been taken prisoners, and their fate is enshrouded in impenetrable mystery. All have done their duty. It is to be regretted that they were not permitted to enter the service under the auspices of their own State, whose soil they had defended; but this privilege which the authorities of their State denied them, was granted them by the sagacious, patriotic, and noble Governor of the ancient commonwealth of Massachusetts. But there has been progress; and since then numbers of the Black Brigade have entered the service in their own State. There can now, therefore, be no objection to preserving in the archives of the State, as a part of the history of the times, this enrolment of the first organization of colored men in the West for military purposes. Respectfully yours, William M. Dickson, Commandant of the Black Brigade. Cincinnati, January 12, 1864.
Cemetery Ridge (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ding to the fortifications, mutual cheers and greetings attested the good feeling between these co-workers in the same cause. The section of work assigned to their special care lay between the Alexandria road and Licking River, along the Cemetery ridge and Threemile Creek. It embraced the making of military roads; the digging of rifle-pits and trenches; the felling of forests, and the building of forts and magazines. The men commenced their work in the rifle-pits on their arrival at Cemetery Ridge. Every thing had to be improvised. The quartermaster and commissary departments required immediate attention, and gave most trouble; but in a few days all was in complete working order. The men discovered a special aptitude for camplife, and with grass, brush, and trees made Camp Lupton an agreeable summer residence. New accessions were received to the ranks every day; colored men, singly, in squads and companies, from every part of Southern Ohio, joining them, until the number exc
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
first finder. They detailed squads of soldiers, who appeared among the negroes at work, selected from them the number they wanted, and at the point of the bayonet marched them off to the camps of the regiments — there to be employed as cooks, or in some menial capacity for the officers. A corporal's guard was engaged in this business when I reached Fort Mitchel. The colored men objected to this; they justly apprehended that they might be carried off with the regiments, or abandoned in Kentucky, where their presence as freemen was one of the most grievous crimes known to that State's laws — punishable with the enslavement of them and their posterity for ever. They expressed entire willingness to labor on the fortifications under proper protection; but they desired to first return to their families, and make preparation for camp-life. My first care was to visit the camps of all the regiments in the vicinity, and to bring from them the kidnapped colored men. Having done this and
Licking Valley (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
the camp, a German asked me if they could not remain longer, as they protected his grapes! They were not intimidated by any danger, though compelled to labor without arms for their protection. During the few days that the soldiers stood in line of battle expecting an attack, the Black Brigade was working nearly a mile in front of the line of battle, and with nothing between it and the enemy except the cavalry scouts. Upon the occasion that it moved upon St. John's Hill, overlooking Licking Valley, so far was it in front of the line, that Colonel Jonah R. Taylor, of the Fiftieth Ohio volunteer infantry, then in command as Acting Brigadier-General of the forces nearest it, supposed it was the enemy; sounded the alarm, ordered out a battery to bear upon it, and in his trepidation actually ordered it to be fired upon; but this was prevented by the good sense of the officer in command of the battery, who refused obedience, and when pressed, fired blank cartridges, and then induced the
Fort Mitchell (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
, John W. Hartwell, William J. Dickson, William H. Chatfield, Alexander Neave, David A. James, Volunteer Aids. I then proceeded to the fortifications where the colored forces were. I found them at work, on the rifle-pits and trenches about Fort Mitchel, on the Lexington road, in the rear of Covington. They had been faithfully laboring during the preceding night, and had already been commended by the engineer in charge for efficient work. They were, however, weary from long labor, and anxiohe number they wanted, and at the point of the bayonet marched them off to the camps of the regiments — there to be employed as cooks, or in some menial capacity for the officers. A corporal's guard was engaged in this business when I reached Fort Mitchel. The colored men objected to this; they justly apprehended that they might be carried off with the regiments, or abandoned in Kentucky, where their presence as freemen was one of the most grievous crimes known to that State's laws — punisha
Saint Johns Hill (Alaska, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
one instance, upon changing the camp, a German asked me if they could not remain longer, as they protected his grapes! They were not intimidated by any danger, though compelled to labor without arms for their protection. During the few days that the soldiers stood in line of battle expecting an attack, the Black Brigade was working nearly a mile in front of the line of battle, and with nothing between it and the enemy except the cavalry scouts. Upon the occasion that it moved upon St. John's Hill, overlooking Licking Valley, so far was it in front of the line, that Colonel Jonah R. Taylor, of the Fiftieth Ohio volunteer infantry, then in command as Acting Brigadier-General of the forces nearest it, supposed it was the enemy; sounded the alarm, ordered out a battery to bear upon it, and in his trepidation actually ordered it to be fired upon; but this was prevented by the good sense of the officer in command of the battery, who refused obedience, and when pressed, fired blank car
1 2 3 4