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Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
clock P. M. Remained here till the evening of the seventeenth, having the horses shod and the men fitted up with clothing, camp and garrison equipage. January seventeenth, at twelve o'clock, we started into Lee County, Virginia. Marched to Indian Creek, and camped for the night. January eighteenth, moved on five miles to Ball's Bridge on Indian Creek. Remained here until the evening of the twenty-fourth. On the evening of the twenty-fourth, our brigade moved back to Cumberland Gap. TwenIndian Creek. Remained here until the evening of the twenty-fourth. On the evening of the twenty-fourth, our brigade moved back to Cumberland Gap. Twenty-fifth, moved back the Jonesville road to Wyman's Mill. Twenty-sixth, moved back near Cumberland Gap. Twenty-seventh, moved back near Ball's Bridge. Remained here until the morning of the twenty-ninth, during which time our regiment turned its horses over to the Eleventh Kentucky mounted infantry. January twenty-ninth, at daylight, the enemy attacked our pickets. Our brigade fell back to within a mile of the Gap. The rebels skirmished with us back to Wyman's Mill. Remained here until th
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
a state of dilapidation; yards and sidewalks grown up with weeds. Crossed the State line into Fentress County, Tennessee, about eleven o'clock A. M. October first, passed through Jamestown, which is another place of desolation. The courthouse has fallen down. A citizen of Fentress County told us that they had had no enforcement of the civil law in that county for about two years; that every man not taken by conscription was a law unto himself. On the morning of the third we got to Montgomery, the county-seat of Anderson County. Here are visible the tracks of this monster — rebellion. The town is evacuated and every thing going to ruin. But one family in town. October fourth, we crossed Clinch River. The country lying between Cumberland and Clinch Rivers is laid in great desolation. We had thought we had seen the desolating effects of the war before, but through this section is the worst we have found in our travels. The people have deserted the country and towns. Som
McGuire (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
and down a few shells. After dark we commenced falling back; passed through Rutledge. December sixteenth, fell back to Blain's Cross-Roads, near the Ruined house. December seventeenth, remained in line of battle; some skirmishing in the front. December eighteenth, our regiment was relieved from the front, and moved to the rear, and went into camp, and was paid off; received two months pay; at night, moved out about five miles to Holston, near McKinney's Ferry, near the mouth of Richland Creek. December nineteenth, came back to Blain's Cross-Roads. Remained here till the twenty-first. Our brigade is about one third dismounted. At two o'clock on the evening of the twenty-first, the mounted part started to Tazewell. On the evening of the twenty-fourth, the dismounted part moved to the bridge at Strawberry Plains. December twenty-fifth, the brigade all came back to Blain's Cross-Roads. December twenty-sixth, remained in camp. December twenty-seventh, late in the e
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
us by the citizens. It was there we worked hard ten months fortifying the place, and made it one among the strongest in Kentucky. There we did as much duty as any regiment will do; but the military fiat saw proper to move us from our own works and home to a field of more active work, and put in our stead strangers, who of course do not understand Kentucky in any way better than we do. We know her geography, the advantages and disadvantages; her friends and her most dangerous enemy — the sneakian occasional skirmish, until February eighth. On the evening of February eighth we crossed through Cumberland Gap into Kentucky. February ninth, crossed Cumberland River at Cumberland Ford. Tenth, passed through Flat Lick. Eleventh, passed thrcamped on Big Hill. Fifteenth, passed through Richmond. Here is where we were first ordered to when we were ordered to Kentucky. Sixteenth, crossed Kentucky River at Ray's Ferry. Passed through Athens. Seventeenth, passed through Winchester. Eig
Little Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 38
gade moved out into town, but every thing not being ready, we were ordered to return to camp and wait till twelve o'clock. At two o'clock we moved out, crossed the river on the pontoon — the same bridge we had at Loudon — marched to Rockford, a small town on Little River, and camped for the night. November second, crossed Little River and marched to Maryville; went into camp and remained there till the morning of the seventh, during which time we scoured the country as far down as Little Tennessee River, where Lieutenant McAdams, of the First Kentucky cavalry, gained a glorious victory by drowning, killing, capturing, and completely routing twice his own number. On the morning of the seventh, General Sanders's cavalry corps fell back across Little River to Rockford, where we remained till the morning of the fourteenth. November fourteenth, early in the morning, the rebels made a dash on the pickets, and captured part of the Eleventh Kentucky cavalry. They soon began to press ou
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
February ninth, crossed Cumberland River at Cumberland Ford. Tenth, passed through Flat Lick. Eleventh, passed through Barboursville, and camped at Laurel Bridge. Twelfth, passed through London and by Camp Pitman. Thirteenth, crossed Rockcastle River, and camped on Big Hill. Fifteenth, passed through Richmond. Here is where we were first ordered to when we were ordered to Kentucky. Sixteenth, crossed Kentucky River at Ray's Ferry. Passed through Athens. Seventeenth, passed through Winchester. Eighteenth, arrived at Mount Sterling. Went into camp about half a mile north of town. Remained here till the eighth day of April, 1864, when the regiment was ordered to Louisville. Arrived at Louisville on the eleventh of April. Here the regiment was put on garrison and provost duty. The above are merely extracts from what we noted in our pocket diary, for no public exhibition, but for our own private use; therefore, we trust, no one will take exception or think we make them publ
Jonesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
the evening of the seventeenth, having the horses shod and the men fitted up with clothing, camp and garrison equipage. January seventeenth, at twelve o'clock, we started into Lee County, Virginia. Marched to Indian Creek, and camped for the night. January eighteenth, moved on five miles to Ball's Bridge on Indian Creek. Remained here until the evening of the twenty-fourth. On the evening of the twenty-fourth, our brigade moved back to Cumberland Gap. Twenty-fifth, moved back the Jonesville road to Wyman's Mill. Twenty-sixth, moved back near Cumberland Gap. Twenty-seventh, moved back near Ball's Bridge. Remained here until the morning of the twenty-ninth, during which time our regiment turned its horses over to the Eleventh Kentucky mounted infantry. January twenty-ninth, at daylight, the enemy attacked our pickets. Our brigade fell back to within a mile of the Gap. The rebels skirmished with us back to Wyman's Mill. Remained here until the thirty-first. Late on the e
Barbourville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
of the Gap. The rebels skirmished with us back to Wyman's Mill. Remained here until the thirty-first. Late on the evening of the thirty-first we moved out to the forks of the Jonesville and Mulberry Gap roads. Here we remained, having an occasional skirmish, until February eighth. On the evening of February eighth we crossed through Cumberland Gap into Kentucky. February ninth, crossed Cumberland River at Cumberland Ford. Tenth, passed through Flat Lick. Eleventh, passed through Barboursville, and camped at Laurel Bridge. Twelfth, passed through London and by Camp Pitman. Thirteenth, crossed Rockcastle River, and camped on Big Hill. Fifteenth, passed through Richmond. Here is where we were first ordered to when we were ordered to Kentucky. Sixteenth, crossed Kentucky River at Ray's Ferry. Passed through Athens. Seventeenth, passed through Winchester. Eighteenth, arrived at Mount Sterling. Went into camp about half a mile north of town. Remained here till the eighth day
Little River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
moved out, crossed the river on the pontoon — the same bridge we had at Loudon — marched to Rockford, a small town on Little River, and camped for the night. November second, crossed Little River and marched to Maryville; went into camp and remaiLittle River and marched to Maryville; went into camp and remained there till the morning of the seventh, during which time we scoured the country as far down as Little Tennessee River, where Lieutenant McAdams, of the First Kentucky cavalry, gained a glorious victory by drowning, killing, capturing, and completely routing twice his own number. On the morning of the seventh, General Sanders's cavalry corps fell back across Little River to Rockford, where we remained till the morning of the fourteenth. November fourteenth, early in the morning, the rebelfrom Frenche's bridge, across Stock Creek, on the Martin Gap road, along the creek to its mouth, where it empties into Little River; a distance of about five miles. November fifteenth, early in the day, the enemy made his appearance along our line
Cave City (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
have been doing during the recent eight months, we offer a few notes from our diary; and we think by the time they have read our short history they will say that we have been soldiering in earnest. Our notes may prove very uninteresting, as our opportunities have not been those of a regular correspondent, as we belong to the ranks and know nothing of the movements until we have them to perform, and then we know only what we do and see. September 18, 1863.--Our company was ordered from Cave City back to Munfordville to rejoin the regiment. We remained at Munfordville till the twenty-fourth of September. On the evening of the twenty-fourth we were mounted, and at four o'clock, with three cheers and hundreds of good-byes, we left the camp that had become almost as home, where we lived a cheerful soldier-life the recent ten months. Our stay at Munfordville is the greatest oasis in our soldier-life. There every member of the regiment had often communication with his home, and his d
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