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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
n motion that you can to send cattle without a moment's delay toward the Georgia borders. The troops in Charleston are in great extremity. We look alone to you for cattle; those in Georgia are exhausted. Major Guerin, Chief Commissary of South-Carolina, wrote: We are almost entirely dependent on Florida, and it is of the last importance, at this time, that the troops here should be subsisted. Again, he says: As it is, our situation is full of danger, from want of meat, and extraordinary efce — the handwriting is on the wall. On the twenty-sixth of October, he says: From the best information I have, the resources of food (meat) of both the Tennessee and Virginia armies are exhausted. The remark now applies with equal force to South-Carolina and Georgia, and the army must henceforth depend upon the energy of the purchasing commissaries, through their daily or weekly collections. I have exhausted the beef cattle, and am now obliged to kill stock cattle. From these you perceive
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 40
s are required to prevent disaster. And on the ninth of October, he says: We have now forty thousand troops and laborers to subsist. The supply of bacon on hand in the city is twenty thousand pounds, and the cattle furnished by this State is not one tenth of what is required. My anxieties, and apprehensions, as you may suppose, are greatly excited. Major Millen, of Savannah, on the tenth of October, says: I assure you, Major, that the stock of bacon and beef for the armies of the confederate States is now exhausted, and we must depend entirely upon what we may gather weekly. Starvation stares the army in the face — the handwriting is on the wall. On the twenty-sixth of October, he says: From the best information I have, the resources of food (meat) of both the Tennessee and Virginia armies are exhausted. The remark now applies with equal force to South-Carolina and Georgia, and the army must henceforth depend upon the energy of the purchasing commissaries, through their daily
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
d infamous race on earth. Whoever has any other thought but to fight on, at any cost of life and property, until we achieve our independence, or all perish in the struggle, deserves to be the slave of such an enemy. But, under the guidance of Providence, our cause is safe in the hands of our army, provided we do our duty at home. But Providence will not help a people who will not help themselves. Our enemies have no hope of conquering us by arms. Their only hope is, that we will be untrue tProvidence will not help a people who will not help themselves. Our enemies have no hope of conquering us by arms. Their only hope is, that we will be untrue to ourselves, and in the blind pursuit of gain, lose sight of our country, and thus suffer our army, and with it our cause, to perish. How stands the case? You know the resources of Tennessee are lost to us; the hog cholera and other causes have cat short the prospect in Georgia and other States. It is ascertained that the last year's crop of bacon is about exhausted, and it is certain that tile crop of this will be much shorter than that of last year. Now two large armies look almost solely
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
we can, and then we will have a clear conscience, no matter what the world may say. Major Locke, Chief Commissary of Georgia, wrote: I pray you, Major, to put every agency in motion that you can to send cattle without a moment's delay toward the Georgia borders. The troops in Charleston are in great extremity. We look alone to you for cattle; those in Georgia are exhausted. Major Guerin, Chief Commissary of South-Carolina, wrote: We are almost entirely dependent on Florida, and it is of both the Tennessee and Virginia armies are exhausted. The remark now applies with equal force to South-Carolina and Georgia, and the army must henceforth depend upon the energy of the purchasing commissaries, through their daily or weekly collese? You know the resources of Tennessee are lost to us; the hog cholera and other causes have cat short the prospect in Georgia and other States. It is ascertained that the last year's crop of bacon is about exhausted, and it is certain that tile
Lake City (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
must sow and plant, and gather for the government. Then, and not till then, will the bright rays of peace break through the clouds of war which overhang us. P. W. White, Major and Chief Commissary. P. S.--You are specially requested not to allow this circular to go out of your possession, but to read it to such persons as you know to be true and prudent, and to begin the work contemplated immediately. Restrictions on food: circular. headquarters, District Eastern Florida, Lake City, January 12, 1864. In conformity with instructions front department headquarters, of December twenty-eighth, 1863, and with the urgent request of Major P. W. White, C. S. for the State of Florida, the removal across the borders of the State (except for army consumption) of all articles of subsistence which make part of the army ration, without special permit, is hereby prohibited, except in cases manifestly for family use, or under circumstances which relieve the transaction from the po
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ould be subsisted. Again, he says: As it is, our situation is full of danger, from want of meat, and extraordinary efforts are required to prevent disaster. And on the ninth of October, he says: We have now forty thousand troops and laborers to subsist. The supply of bacon on hand in the city is twenty thousand pounds, and the cattle furnished by this State is not one tenth of what is required. My anxieties, and apprehensions, as you may suppose, are greatly excited. Major Millen, of Savannah, on the tenth of October, says: I assure you, Major, that the stock of bacon and beef for the armies of the confederate States is now exhausted, and we must depend entirely upon what we may gather weekly. Starvation stares the army in the face — the handwriting is on the wall. On the twenty-sixth of October, he says: From the best information I have, the resources of food (meat) of both the Tennessee and Virginia armies are exhausted. The remark now applies with equal force to South-Caro
Charleston, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
-day is on half-rations of beef, and I fear within a few days will have nothing but bread to eat. This is truly a dark hour with us, and I cannot see what is to be done. All that is left for us to do is to do all we can, and then we will have a clear conscience, no matter what the world may say. Major Locke, Chief Commissary of Georgia, wrote: I pray you, Major, to put every agency in motion that you can to send cattle without a moment's delay toward the Georgia borders. The troops in Charleston are in great extremity. We look alone to you for cattle; those in Georgia are exhausted. Major Guerin, Chief Commissary of South-Carolina, wrote: We are almost entirely dependent on Florida, and it is of the last importance, at this time, that the troops here should be subsisted. Again, he says: As it is, our situation is full of danger, from want of meat, and extraordinary efforts are required to prevent disaster. And on the ninth of October, he says: We have now forty thousand troo
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
the slave of such an enemy. But, under the guidance of Providence, our cause is safe in the hands of our army, provided we do our duty at home. But Providence will not help a people who will not help themselves. Our enemies have no hope of conquering us by arms. Their only hope is, that we will be untrue to ourselves, and in the blind pursuit of gain, lose sight of our country, and thus suffer our army, and with it our cause, to perish. How stands the case? You know the resources of Tennessee are lost to us; the hog cholera and other causes have cat short the prospect in Georgia and other States. It is ascertained that the last year's crop of bacon is about exhausted, and it is certain that tile crop of this will be much shorter than that of last year. Now two large armies look almost solely to Florida to supply one entire article of subsistence. The entire surplus of this year's crop of bacon throughout the Confederacy, even when husbanded with the utmost economy, will be i
Quincy, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
Doc. 38.-the rebel commissariat. Official circular. office of Chief Commissary, Quincy, Fla., November 2, 1863. it has been a subject of anxious consideration how I could, without injury to our cause, expose to the people throughout the State the present perilous condition of our army. To do this through the public press would point out our source of danger to our enemies. To see each one in person, or even a sufficient number to effect the object contemplated, is impossible; yet the necessity of general and immediate action is imperative to save our army, and with it our cause, from disaster. The issues of this contest are now transferred to the people at home. If they fail to do their duty and sustain the army in its present position, it must fall back. If the enemy break through our present line, the wave of desolation may roll even to the shores of the Gulf and Atlantic. In discipline, valor, and the skill of its leaders, our army has proven more than a match fo
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
hips, and with their lives are now defending every thing we hold most sacred. Florida has done nobly in this contest. Her sons have achieved the highest character s. These brave men are now suffering for want of food. Not only the men from Florida, but the whole army of the South are in this condition. Our honor as a peopleChief Commissary of South-Carolina, wrote: We are almost entirely dependent on Florida, and it is of the last importance, at this time, that the troops here should bch shorter than that of last year. Now two large armies look almost solely to Florida to supply one entire article of subsistence. The entire surplus of this year'mediately. Restrictions on food: circular. headquarters, District Eastern Florida, Lake City, January 12, 1864. In conformity with instructions front dephth, 1863, and with the urgent request of Major P. W. White, C. S. for the State of Florida, the removal across the borders of the State (except for army consumption)
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