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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
promising sun. My friends, I come to-night to address myself to Georgians. Deeply as every portion of our people are interested in the present condition of the country, to none does it come with more and deeper interest than to the people of Georgia. I am a Georgian, proud of my native State. I was born upon her soil, nurtured in her bosom, educated in her faith. All that I am, all that I hope ever to be, I owe to her. Beneath her soil sleep the bones of my fathers and those of my own ofistory in the past and in the present, and I hope I shall love it in the future; but, thank God, I have a heart big enough to love every inch of soil over which floats the proud banner of our Southern Confederacy. To you, then, my brethren of Georgia, I come to-night to make an appeal. Your soil is invaded, your homes are threatened. Do you wish to know what it is to have a Yankee army encamped in the heart of your State? Do you wish to realize the desolation which would follow the track
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
d, your homes are threatened. Do you wish to know what it is to have a Yankee army encamped in the heart of your State? Do you wish to realize the desolation which would follow the track of a merciless and cruel enemy? If so, go to Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and let their burned villages, their desolate homes, their property of every kind destroyed, teach you the lesson. Do you hope to fare better than your brethren of those States? Is there burning in your hearts a whining spirit of Uy friends, ours is a common fate and a common destiny, and I thank God that it is so. We must all be free, or all be slaves. We must all live or all perish. If you read the history of the outrages which the Yankees perpetrated in Virginia and Tennessee, you will see that it must be so. Do you love your property? It has been destroyed and trampled under foot. Do you love your dwellings? They have been reduced to ashes. Do you love your wives and daughters? They have been dishonored and ou
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
ence of some man that can be reached. I confess frankly to you, that with all my confidence in our cause, with all my devotion to it, my heart sinks within me when these scenes are passing before me view. I ask myself the question: Can a kind Providence, a God of mercy and justice, bless a people among whom these wrongs are perpetrated; these outrages practised? I know, my friends, that our people have done well by the soldiers' families; I know that in many counties ample provisions have b mad efforts to take away our liberties, they have lost their own. They are as powerless to aid you as they are to protect themselves. You must either submit to Lincoln and abolitionism, or, by your own unaided arm, with the blessing of a kind Providence, win your liberty and your independence. Think not that there is a power at the North to restore to you the Constitution and the Union as they were, even if you were prepared to accept it. You must either be freemen or you must submit to Linco
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
Doc. 59.-speech of Howell Cobb. Delivered at Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 28, 1864. When I look back, my friends, to the last few months, I confess that the present moment is one corresponding with that bright sun that has blessed us in the past few days with his benignant rays; I feel energy anew arising up in my heart, and a new inspiration appealing to the manhood of every citizen of our Confederacy, stimulating him to renewed efforts in the great cause in which we are engaged. When I look to yse bravo men be clothed and fed and supported in the field, but their families must be provided for and taken care of at home. When I see a soldier's wife, whose little ones are dependent upon her labor for support, go into one of the stores of Atlanta, and she is asked to pay from ten to twenty dollars per bushel for meal, and corresponding prices for other articles necessary for the support and comfort of that family, I am compelled in my heart to say there is some great wrong somewhere. I
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
he future; but, thank God, I have a heart big enough to love every inch of soil over which floats the proud banner of our Southern Confederacy. To you, then, my brethren of Georgia, I come to-night to make an appeal. Your soil is invaded, your homes are threatened. Do you wish to know what it is to have a Yankee army encamped in the heart of your State? Do you wish to realize the desolation which would follow the track of a merciless and cruel enemy? If so, go to Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and let their burned villages, their desolate homes, their property of every kind destroyed, teach you the lesson. Do you hope to fare better than your brethren of those States? Is there burning in your hearts a whining spirit of Unionism, by which you hope to commend yourselves to the tender mercies of this heartless foe? I tell you to-night that the few poor, miserable persons-dishonored in name and reputation — who have sought in this way to save themselves from the effects of Yankee
A. Lincoln (search for this): chapter 61
if the enemy gets possession of your country? What are your rights in the hands and under the control of the minions of Lincoln? You must choose between our own people and our own government, and the people and the government of your enemy. There hope to what has been termed the conservative element of the North, and expect to be preserved and protected by it from Lincoln's power and dominion? Banish the fatal delusion. Conservatism at the North lies prostrate in the dust. In their mad ethey have lost their own. They are as powerless to aid you as they are to protect themselves. You must either submit to Lincoln and abolitionism, or, by your own unaided arm, with the blessing of a kind Providence, win your liberty and your indepenion and the Union as they were, even if you were prepared to accept it. You must either be freemen or you must submit to Lincoln, and he has given you his terms. I put the picture before you. Do you stagger before it, or does it arouse within you
Doc. 59.-speech of Howell Cobb. Delivered at Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 28, 1864. When I look back, my friends, to the last few months, I confess that the present moment is one corresponding with that bright sun that has blessed us in the past few days with his benignant rays; I feel energy anew arising up in my heart, and a new inspiration appealing to the manhood of every citizen of our Confederacy, stimulating him to renewed efforts in the great cause in which we are engaged. When I look to your army, I find that its ranks are being filled up day by day, and the roll of honor increasing with every morning and evening's sun. The spirit of these brave men is unbroken. Would that our people throughout the land could gather the inspiration as it rises around the camp-fires of our army. Despair would cease among them, and despondency give way before a bright and promising sun. My friends, I come to-night to address myself to Georgians. Deeply as every portion of our people are int
Howell Cobb (search for this): chapter 61
Doc. 59.-speech of Howell Cobb. Delivered at Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 28, 1864. When I look back, my friends, to the last few months, I confess that the present moment is one corresponding with that bright sun that has blessed us in the past few days with his benignant rays; I feel energy anew arising up in my heart, and a new inspiration appealing to the manhood of every citizen of our Confederacy, stimulating him to renewed efforts in the great cause in which we are engaged. When I look to your army, I find that its ranks are being filled up day by day, and the roll of honor increasing with every morning and evening's sun. The spirit of these brave men is unbroken. Would that our people throughout the land could gather the inspiration as it rises around the camp-fires of our army. Despair would cease among them, and despondency give way before a bright and promising sun. My friends, I come to-night to address myself to Georgians. Deeply as every portion of our people are int
January 28th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 61
Doc. 59.-speech of Howell Cobb. Delivered at Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 28, 1864. When I look back, my friends, to the last few months, I confess that the present moment is one corresponding with that bright sun that has blessed us in the past few days with his benignant rays; I feel energy anew arising up in my heart, and a new inspiration appealing to the manhood of every citizen of our Confederacy, stimulating him to renewed efforts in the great cause in which we are engaged. When I look to your army, I find that its ranks are being filled up day by day, and the roll of honor increasing with every morning and evening's sun. The spirit of these brave men is unbroken. Would that our people throughout the land could gather the inspiration as it rises around the camp-fires of our army. Despair would cease among them, and despondency give way before a bright and promising sun. My friends, I come to-night to address myself to Georgians. Deeply as every portion of our people are int