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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Pala (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
ut six hundred Indians had collected there; but when the wagons arrived to remove them only one hundred wished to go, and the remainder desired to return to their villages and caves in the mountains, on pretence of bringing in some absent member of their families. Colonel Carson very nobly and generously permitted them to choose for themselves; but told them, if ever they came in again they should be sent to Borgue Redondo, whether willing or not. Colonel Carson himself took the Indians to Santa Fe, and will remain absent about a month. Since his departure many Indians came in and agreed to go to the reservation. I think the Colonel foresaw this, as no person understands Indian character better than he does. Captain A. B. Carey, Thirteenth infantry, commanding in his absence, will see that all Indians coming in will be removed, and I think, before April next, if the present good feeling exists, we shall have accomplished the removal of the entire tribe. Captain A. B. Carey, afte
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
Doc. 64.-operations in New-Mexico. camp Florilla, near Fort Canby, N. M., January 26, 1864. The cumminating point in this expedition has been reached at last by the very successful operations of our troops at Cañon de Chelly. Colonel Kit Carson left Fort Canby on the sixth instant, with a command of four hundred men, t having been pierced with six bullets. As the Navajo expedition is now entirely successful, it is but justice to the officers and men of the First cavalry of New-Mexico, and to Colonel Christopher Carson and his staff, to say that they have all acted with zeal and devotion for the accomplishment of that great desideratum — the all to great energy and inspired great resolution; but it may not be out of place to remark that it is now demonstrated beyond a doubt that, while the troops of New-Mexico have long borne the reputation of being the best cavalry, they have proved themselves on the present campaign to be the best infantry in the world. General J
Fort Defiance (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
Doc. 64.-operations in New-Mexico. camp Florilla, near Fort Canby, N. M., January 26, 1864. The cumminating point in this expedition has been reached at lcessful operations of our troops at Cañon de Chelly. Colonel Kit Carson left Fort Canby on the sixth instant, with a command of four hundred men, twenty of whom weree country next summer. On the twentieth of January, Colonel Carson came to Fort Canby, and about six hundred Indians had collected there; but when the wagons arrivr successfully marching through the cation and noting its topography, reached Fort Canby on the eighteenth instant, and relieved Captain Francis McCabe, First New-Mexd in the absence of Colonel Kit Carson. A military execution took place at Fort Canby on the eighteenth instant. Private John Caulfield was shot to death by a detais execution in three days from the date of reception of the general order at Fort Canby. He died without a struggle, his heart having been pierced with six bullets.
Puebla (Puebla, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 66
Doc. 64.-operations in New-Mexico. camp Florilla, near Fort Canby, N. M., January 26, 1864. The cumminating point in this expedition has been reached at last by the very successful operations of our troops at Cañon de Chelly. Colonel Kit Carson left Fort Canby on the sixth instant, with a command of four hundred men, twenty of whom were mounted. He had a section of mountain artillery with him, and taking the road via Puebla, Colorado, he started for Cañion de Chelly. He gave orders to Captain Pheiffer, with his command of one hundred men, to enter the cañon at the east opening, while he himself intended to enter it at the mouth, or west opening, and by this movement he expected that both columns would meet in the cañon on the second day, as it was supposed to be forty miles in length. Captain Pheiffer's party proceeded two days through the cañon, fighting occasionally; but although the Indians frequently fired on them from the rocky walls above, the balls were spent lo
A. B. Carey (search for this): chapter 66
lements, seeds, etc., to cultivate the soil. They departed well satisfied, and Colonel Carson immediately ordered Captain A. B. Carey, Thirteenth United States infantry, with a battalion, to enter the cation and make a thorough, exploration of its Navajoes he might encounter, and to receive all who were friendly and who wished to emigrate to the new reservation. Captain Carey, during a passage of twenty-four hours through a branch of the cañon hitherto unexplored, made an exact geographical reservation. I think the Colonel foresaw this, as no person understands Indian character better than he does. Captain A. B. Carey, Thirteenth infantry, commanding in his absence, will see that all Indians coming in will be removed, and I think,efore April next, if the present good feeling exists, we shall have accomplished the removal of the entire tribe. Captain A. B. Carey, after successfully marching through the cation and noting its topography, reached Fort Canby on the eighteenth in
John Caulfield (search for this): chapter 66
, reached Fort Canby on the eighteenth instant, and relieved Captain Francis McCabe, First New-Mexico cavalry, who commanded in the absence of Colonel Kit Carson. A military execution took place at Fort Canby on the eighteenth instant. Private John Caulfield was shot to death by a detachment of his regiment, in presence of all the troops at the post, who were paraded under arms on the occasion. Caulfield had been tried and sentenced for shooting a Mexican soldier of his own regiment, and tCaulfield had been tried and sentenced for shooting a Mexican soldier of his own regiment, and the Department Commander ordered his execution in three days from the date of reception of the general order at Fort Canby. He died without a struggle, his heart having been pierced with six bullets. As the Navajo expedition is now entirely successful, it is but justice to the officers and men of the First cavalry of New-Mexico, and to Colonel Christopher Carson and his staff, to say that they have all acted with zeal and devotion for the accomplishment of that great desideratum — the remova
Francis McCabe (search for this): chapter 66
lonel foresaw this, as no person understands Indian character better than he does. Captain A. B. Carey, Thirteenth infantry, commanding in his absence, will see that all Indians coming in will be removed, and I think, before April next, if the present good feeling exists, we shall have accomplished the removal of the entire tribe. Captain A. B. Carey, after successfully marching through the cation and noting its topography, reached Fort Canby on the eighteenth instant, and relieved Captain Francis McCabe, First New-Mexico cavalry, who commanded in the absence of Colonel Kit Carson. A military execution took place at Fort Canby on the eighteenth instant. Private John Caulfield was shot to death by a detachment of his regiment, in presence of all the troops at the post, who were paraded under arms on the occasion. Caulfield had been tried and sentenced for shooting a Mexican soldier of his own regiment, and the Department Commander ordered his execution in three days from the dat
Doc. 64.-operations in New-Mexico. camp Florilla, near Fort Canby, N. M., January 26, 1864. The cumminating point in this expedition has been reached at last by the very successful operations of our troops at Cañon de Chelly. Colonel Kit Carson left Fort Canby on the sixth instant, with a command of four hundred men, twenty of whom were mounted. He had a section of mountain artillery with him, and taking the road via Puebla, Colorado, he started for Cañion de Chelly. He gave orders to Captain Pheiffer, with his command of one hundred men, to enter the cañon at the east opening, while he himself intended to enter it at the mouth, or west opening, and by this movement he expected that both columns would meet in the cañon on the second day, as it was supposed to be forty miles in length. Captain Pheiffer's party proceeded two days through the cañon, fighting occasionally; but although the Indians frequently fired on them from the rocky walls above, the balls were spent l
Kit Carson (search for this): chapter 66
tions of our troops at Cañon de Chelly. Colonel Kit Carson left Fort Canby on the sixth instant, wiulture. On the second day, a party from Colonel Carson's column met the Captain in the cañon, and returned with him to Colonel Carson's camp. A party from the Colonel's command had in the mean timthree of their number under a white flag. Colonel Carson received them, and assured them that the Ge soil. They departed well satisfied, and Colonel Carson immediately ordered Captain A. B. Carey, Txt summer. On the twentieth of January, Colonel Carson came to Fort Canby, and about six hundred in some absent member of their families. Colonel Carson very nobly and generously permitted them tcavalry, who commanded in the absence of Colonel Kit Carson. A military execution took place at Fs due to the perseverance and courage of Colonel Kit Carson, commanding the expedition, whose examplremoved, that brigade, commanded by Brigadier-General Kit Carson, would surely reflect credit on the[1 more...]
Apache Indians (search for this): chapter 66
ch reminded the beholder of the swallows' nests in the house-eaves, or on the rocky formation overhanging the sea-beat caves. Further on, an orchard containing about six hundred peach-trees was passed, and it was evident that the Indians had paid great attention to their culture. On the second day, a party from Colonel Carson's column met the Captain in the cañon, and returned with him to Colonel Carson's camp. A party from the Colonel's command had in the mean time attacked a party of Indians, twenty-two of whom were killed. This had a dispiriting effect on many others, who sent in three of their number under a white flag. Colonel Carson received them, and assured them that the Government did not desire to exterminate them, but that on the contrary the President wished to save and civilize them; and to that end General Carlton had given him instructions to send all the Navajoes who desired peace to the new reservation on the Rio Pecos, where they would be supplied with food fo
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