hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 640 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 443 19 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 321 3 Browse Search
Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) 296 8 Browse Search
Doc 290 0 Browse Search
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) 278 8 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 276 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 267 3 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 256 0 Browse Search
N. B. Forrest 240 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 149 total hits in 57 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 76
Doc. 74.-the escape from Libby Prison. Washington, D. C., Feb. 18, 1864. A large number of officers, who escaped from Libby Prison a few days ago, arrived in this city last night, and from them we gather very interesting statements relative to their manner of escape. Over two months ago, the officers confined in Libby Prison conceived the idea of effecting their own exchange, and after the matter had been seriously discussed by some seven or eight of them, they undertook to dig for a distance toward a sewer running into the basin. This they proposed doing by commencing at a point in the cellar, near a chimney. This cellar was immediately under the hospital, and was the receptacle for refuse straw, thrown from the beds when they were changed, and for other refuse matter. Above the hospital was a room for officers, and above that, yet another room. The chimney ran through all these rooms, and the prisoners who were in the secret, improvised a rope, and night after nigh
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 76
ners made considerable noise in getting to their respective quarters. Providentially, however, the guard suspected nothing wrong, and in a few moments the exodus was again commenced. Colonel Kendrick and his companions looked with trepidation upon the movements of the fugitives, as some of them, exercising but little discretion, moved boldly out of the inclosure into the glare of the gaslight. Many of them were, however, dressed in citizen's dress, and as all the rebel guards wear the United States uniform, but little suspicion could be excited, even if the fugitives had been accosted by the guard. Between one and two o'clock the lamps were extinguished in the streets, and then the exit was more safely accomplished. There were many officers who desired to leave, who were so weak and feeble that they were dragged through the tunnel by main force and carried to places of safety until such time as they would be able to move on their journey. At half-past 2 o'clock, Captain Jones,
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
ominy about four miles below Bottom Bridge. Here now was a difficulty. The river was only twenty feet wide, but it was very deep, and the refugees were worn out and fatigued. Chancing, however, to look up, Lieutenant Bradford saw that two trees had fallen on either side of the river, and that their branches were interlocked. By crawling up one tree and down the other, the fugitives reached the east bank of the Chickahominy, and Colonel Kendrick could not help remarking that he believed Providence was on their side, else they would not have met that natural bridge. They subsequently learned from a friendly negro that had they crossed the bridge they had seen, they would assuredly have been recaptured, for Captain Turner, the keeper of Libby Prison, had been out and posted guards there, and, in fact, had alarmed the whole country, and got the people up as a vigilance committee to capture the escaped prisoners. After crossing over this natural bridge, they lay down on the ground
Boar Swamp (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
A description of the route pursued by this party, and of the tribulations through which they passed, will give some idea of the rough time they all had of it. Colonel Kendrick had, before leaving the prison, mapped out his course, and concluded that the best route to take was the one toward Norfolk or Fortress Monroe, as there were fewer rebel pickets in that direction. They, therefore, kept the York River Railroad to the left, and moved toward the Chickahominy River. They passed through Boar Swamp, and crossed the road leading to Bottom Bridge. Sometimes they waded through mud and water almost up to their necks, and kept the Bottom Bridge road to their left, although at times they could see and hear the cars travelling over the York River road. While passing through the swamp near the Chickahominy, Colonel Kendrick sprained his ankle and fell. Fortunate, too, was that fall for him and his party, for while he was lying there one of them chanced to look up, and saw in a direct li
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
ur high appreciation of his prompt and extensive efforts to aid our comrades, who are yet in the rebel lines, attempting to elude their vigilance, and .make good their escape from that prison of refined cruelty and slow death. This is signed by the following officers, who are all at this time in this city: William B. McCreery, Colonel Twenty-first Michigan infantry; W. P. Kendrick, Colonel West-Tennessee cavalry; Alexander Theobald Von Wizel, Lieutenant-Colonel. Seventy-fourth regiment Pennsylvania volunteer infantry; J. F. Boyd, Lieutenant-Colonel and Quartermaster of volunteers; T. S. West, Lieutenant-Colonel Twenty-fourth Wisconsin volunteer infantry; H. C. Hobert, Lieutenant-Colonel Twenty-first Wisconsin volunteer infantry; J. P. Collins, Major Twentieth Indiana infantry; G. R. Fitzsimmons, Major Thirtieth Indiana volunteers; J. F. Gallaher, Captain company B, Second Ohio volunteer infantry; Matt. Boyd, Captain, Seventy-third Indiana; A. G. Hamilton, Captain company A, Twelfth
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
ty, and of the tribulations through which they passed, will give some idea of the rough time they all had of it. Colonel Kendrick had, before leaving the prison, mapped out his course, and concluded that the best route to take was the one toward Norfolk or Fortress Monroe, as there were fewer rebel pickets in that direction. They, therefore, kept the York River Railroad to the left, and moved toward the Chickahominy River. They passed through Boar Swamp, and crossed the road leading to Bottomsecesh woman, and that she had a son in the rebel army. The party, however, was exceedingly hungry, and they determined to secure some food. This they did by boldly approaching the house and informing the mistress that they were prisoners from Norfolk, who had been driven out by Butler, and the secesh sympathies of the woman were at once aroused, and she gave them of her substance, and started them on their way with directions how to avoid the Yankee soldiers, who occasionally scouted in that
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
at the best route to take was the one toward Norfolk or Fortress Monroe, as there were fewer rebel pickets in that direction. They, therefore, kept the York River Railroad to the left, and moved toward the Chickahominy River. They passed through Boar Swamp, and crossed the road leading to Bottom Bridge. Sometimes they waded through mud and water almost up to their necks, and kept the Bottom Bridge road to their left, although at times they could see and hear the cars travelling over the York River road. While passing through the swamp near the Chickahominy, Colonel Kendrick sprained his ankle and fell. Fortunate, too, was that fall for him and his party, for while he was lying there one of them chanced to look up, and saw in a direct line with them a swamp-bridge, and in the dim outline they could perceive that parties with muskets were passing over the bridge. They, therefore, moved some distance to the south, and after passing through more of the swamp, reached the Chickahomi
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
down from its enunciated policy of exchange. Colonel Rose, of New-York; Colonel Kendrick, of Tennessee; Captain Jones, Lieutenant Bradford, and others, informed General Dow that they could not see let down through the chimney successfully into the cellar. Colonel W. P. Kendrick, of West-Tennessee; Captain D. J. Jones, of the First Kentucky cavalry, and Lieutenant R. Y. Bradford, of the Second West-Tennessee, were detailed as a rearguard, or rather to go out last; and from a window Colonel Kendrick and his companions could see the fugitives walk out of a gate at the other end of the ine officers had a meeting, which was presided over by Colonel W. P. Kendrick, of the Third West-Tennessee cavalry, and at which Colonel West, of the Fourth Wisconsin, acted as Secretary, and the folloity: William B. McCreery, Colonel Twenty-first Michigan infantry; W. P. Kendrick, Colonel West-Tennessee cavalry; Alexander Theobald Von Wizel, Lieutenant-Colonel. Seventy-fourth regiment Pennsylvani
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
onsequences if they were recaptured; and others yet, (among whom was General Neal Dow,) declined to make the attempt, as (they said) they did not desire to have their Government back down from its enunciated policy of exchange. Colonel Rose, of New-York; Colonel Kendrick, of Tennessee; Captain Jones, Lieutenant Bradford, and others, informed General Dow that they could not see how making their escape would affect the policy of exchange. Their principle was that it was their personal right to escape if they could, and their duty to their Government to make the attempt. About half-past 8 o'clock on the evening of the ninth, the prisoners started out, Colonel Rose, of New-York, leading the van. Before starting, the prisoners had divided themselves into squads of two, three, and four, and each squad was to take a different route, and after they were out, were to push for the Union lines as fast as possible. It was the understanding that the working party was to have an hour's start o
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
. This information was exceedingly valuable to the refugees, for by it they discovered the whereabouts of the Federal forces. When about fifteen miles from Williamsburgh, the party came upon the main road, and found the tracks of a large body of cavalry. A piece of paper found by Captain Jones satisfied him that they were Union cavalry; but his companions were suspicious, and avoided the road, and moved forward, and at the Burnt ordinary (about ten miles from Williamsburgh) waited the return of the cavalry that had moved up the road, and from behind a fence-corner, where they were secreted, the fugitives saw the flag of the Union supported by a squadron sent out for the purpose of picking up escaped prisoners. Colonel Kendrick says his feelings at seeing the old flag are indescribable. The party rode into Williamsburgh with the cavalry, where they were quartered for the night, and where they found eleven others who had escaped safely. Colonel Spears and his command furnished
1 2 3 4 5 6