hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 702 0 Browse Search
Doc 416 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburgh (New York, United States) 318 4 Browse Search
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) 263 15 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 238 14 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 229 7 Browse Search
James G. Blunt 163 1 Browse Search
Fitz-Hugh Lee 150 2 Browse Search
Robert L. McCook 149 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 149 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 613 total hits in 181 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
l, Department of the Tennessee: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the forces of which, in pursuance of the order of Major-General Grant, commanding the department of the Tennessee, I assumed command on the fourth inst., at Milliken's Bend, La., resulting in the reduction of Fort Hindman, more generally known as Post Arkansas. These forces, styled by me for convenience and propriety of description, the Army of the Mississippi, consisted of parts of two corixteenth Ohio, Twenty-second Kentucky, Forty-second Ohio, Fifty-fourth Indiana, infantry. Artillery--First Wisconsin, Capt. Foster, Seventh Michigan, Captain Lamphere. Having, as already mentioned, assumed command of these forces on the fourth instant, after they had retired from the neighborhood of Vicksburgh, I sailed with them, the same day, in execution of a purpose, the importance of which I had suggested to Gen. Gorman, at Helena, on the thirtieth December ultimo, on my way down the
nts ; and ammunition taken from her was used against us in the engagement of which [ am giving an account. Without turning my arms in this direction, my forces must have continued comparatively idle, at Milliken's Bend, until you should have altered your plan for the reduction of Vicksburgh, or recalled them. Landing at intervals to supply my transports with fuel cut from the forest, or already cut and found upon the bank, the army safely arrived at the mouth of the White River on the eighth inst. Henceforth its operations were controlled by, and but fulfilled the following instructions, previously communicated by me to army corps commanders: First. Having arrived at the mouth of the White River, the commanders of army corps of the army of the Mississippi will lose no time in moving their commands upon their transports, up that river to the cut-off, and through it into and up the Arkansas River to a suitable point on the left bank of the same, near and below Post Arkansas for d
eded in doing so, until I had approached within thirty miles of the Fort. Landing on the left bank of the river, at Notrib's farm, at five o'clock P. M., on the ninth, the work of disembarking was busily continued until noon the next day, when it was completed. In the mean time, accompanied by Lieut.-Col. Schwartz, of my stafanding the neighboring approaches across the swamp, and covering our transports against possible attack from the opposite side of the river. On the night of the ninth, Col. Lindsay's brigade had disembarked nine miles below Notrib's farm, at Fletcher's Landing, on the right bank of the river, in pursuance of General Morgan's ordailed three in iron-clads — the Louisville, Baron de Kalb, and Cincinnati — with all the light-draft gunboats, all of which had to be towed up the river. On the ninth we ascended the Arkansas River as high as Arkansas Post, when the army landed within about four miles of the Fort. The enemy had thrown up heavy earthworks and ex
panied by Lieut.-Col. Schwartz, of my staff, by eight o'clock A. M., on the tenth instant, I had reconnoitred the river-road, and a portion of the levee, extending a or reenforcement of the enemy by water. This was accomplished early on the tenth inst., and formed an important part of my original plan; for the prompt and skilfuders from General Steele, the Second brigade debarked on the morning of the tenth instant, at Notrib's plantation, about one mile below Arkansas Post, and marched inave the honor to report that in the attack on this place, on the evening of the tenth, this vessel was struck several times, but with no serious injury to vessel or ave the honor to report having sustained no serious damage in the attack on the tenth. One shell struck us at the water-line forward, and a second went through the u during the attack upon this Post, by the forces under your command, on the tenth instant, fourteen Parrott shells and two eight-inch shells, and during the final an
shoulder, slightly; J. T. Blatchford, ensign, wounded in leg, severely; Walter Williams, seaman, killed. W. D. Hoffman, A. A. Surgeon. Report of Lieutenant Commanding Walker. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Baron De Kalb, Arkansas Post, January 12, 1863. sir: I have the honor to report that in the attack on this place, on the evening of the tenth, this vessel was struck several times, but with no serious injury to vessel or crew. In the attack on the eleventh, one of the ten-inch guns was struck in the muzzle, and both gun and carriage destroyed; one thirty-two-pounder carriage struck and destroyed; one of the iron plates on forward casemate badly broken by shot; the wood-work about two of the port badly torn by shot, and one lower-deck beam cut off by a plunging shot through the deck. The other injuries, although considerable, can be repaired on board in a few days. I lost two men killed, and fifteen wounded--two probably mortal and several s
seventeen--in all in killed, wounded, and missing, nine hundred and seventy-seven; while that of the enemy, notwithstanding the protection afforded by his defences, proportionably to his numbers, was much larger. The prisoners of war I forwarded to the Commissioner for the exchange of prisoners at St. Louis, and utterly destroying all of the enemy's defences, together with all buildings used by him for military purposes, I reembarked my command and sailed for Milliken's Bend on the seventeenth instant, in obedience to Major-Gen. Grant's orders. Noticing the conduct of the officers and men who took part in the battle of the Arkansas, I must refer to the reports of corps, division, brigade and regimental commanders for particular mention of those who specially signalized their merit; but in doing so, I cannot forbear, in justice, to add my tribute to the general zeal and capability of the former, and valor and constancy of the latter. Gen. Sherman exhibited his usual activity a
. The Commander-in-Chief of the confederate forces was Brigadier-General Churchill; Captain Ben. Johnson, Adjutant-General, Captain Wolf, Chief Quartermaster, Captain Little and Captain Brown, aids. Brigade commanders were Colonel Deshler, Colonel Garland, and Colonel Portlock. There was also a large number of captains and lieutenants. They will be sent to Cairo this morning. Our loss in the engagement was about one hundred killed, and five hundred wounded, who go up on the steamer January. To-day they are digging the graves and collecting the dead for burial. Fifty or more additional corpses have been found in the woods far back, evidently skulkers from the rebel army, killed by our shell. Prisoners are also constantly brought in, overtaken twelve or fifteen miles away. Of the entire force garrisoning the Fort, one thousand, mostly Texas cavalry, escaped, taking with then a great portion of the baggage-train. These effected an exit on the night our forces were surroun
January 4th (search for this): chapter 110
euts. J. E. Bryant, and F. H. Wilson, and Sergeant Sid. C. Morgan. Inclosed are lists of casualties in the several regiments. I have the honor to be, respectfully, Your obedient servant, Charles E. Hovey, Brigadier-General. F. M. Crandal, A. A.G. To Captain J. W. Paddock, A. A. General First Division, Fifteenth Army Corps. Report of rear-admiral Porter. United States Mississippi Squadron, Arkansas Post, Jan. 11, 1863. sir: I have the honor to inform you that on the fourth of January, General McClernand concluded to move up the river upon the Post of Arkansas, and requested my cooperation. I detailed three in iron-clads — the Louisville, Baron de Kalb, and Cincinnati — with all the light-draft gunboats, all of which had to be towed up the river. On the ninth we ascended the Arkansas River as high as Arkansas Post, when the army landed within about four miles of the Fort. The enemy had thrown up heavy earthworks and extensive rifle-pits all along the levee. Wh
January 12th (search for this): chapter 110
fourteen Parrott shells and two eight-inch shells, and during the final and victorious assault of to-day, forty-nine eight-inch shells and forty Parrott shells. I am happy to report no casualties. The woodwork of the ship and two of our boats are somewhat damaged. I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient servant, James W. Shirk, Lieutenant Commander. Assistant Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi River Squadron. Missouri Republican account. Arkansas Post, January 12. The eighth found our fleet on its way back from the ill-planned attack at Vicksburgh, opposite the mouth of White River. There was one change for the better, however. The troops, although somewhat dispirited, were no longer under a leader whom they wholly distrusted. An alteration was needed, and General Sherman was not superseded a moment two soon. General McClernand had taken command in his place. At the mouth there was a pause, and White River's silent banks, its narrow chann
December 30th (search for this): chapter 110
Colonel J. I)e Courcy, commanding--Sixteenth Ohio, Twenty-second Kentucky, Forty-second Ohio, Fifty-fourth Indiana, infantry. Artillery--First Wisconsin, Capt. Foster, Seventh Michigan, Captain Lamphere. Having, as already mentioned, assumed command of these forces on the fourth instant, after they had retired from the neighborhood of Vicksburgh, I sailed with them, the same day, in execution of a purpose, the importance of which I had suggested to Gen. Gorman, at Helena, on the thirtieth December ultimo, on my way down the river. That purpose was the reduction of Fort Hindman, which had been laboriously and skilfully enlarged and strengthened, since the commencement of the rebellion; which formed the key to Little Rock, the capital of the State of Arkansas, and the extensive and valuable country drained by the Arkansas River, and from which hostile detachments were constantly sent forth to obstruct the navigation of the Mississippi River and thereby our communications. A Go
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...