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Arkansas County (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
rst Wisconsin battery, Capt. Foster commanding, and a section of the Illinois Mercantile battery, under Lieutenant Wilson, were with Col Lindsey. The cavalry were disposed in the rear, under orders to force stragglers to return to their ranks. Such was the disposition of the forces under my command on the eve of the battle of the Arkansas. On the other hand, the position of the enemy, naturally strong, was one of his own choosing. Post Arkansas, a small village, the capital of Arkansas county, is situated on elevated ground above the reach of floods, and defining for some miles, the left bank of the river. It was settled by the French in 1685, is fifty miles above the mouth of the river; one hundred and seventeen miles below Little Rock, and is surrounded by a fruitful country, abounding in cattle, corn, and cotton. Fort Hindman, a square full-bastioned fort, is erected within this village upon the bank of the river, at the head of a bend resembling a horseshoe. The ext
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
Darnel's. Six of the nine guns in the Fort belonged to Captain Hart's Arkansas battery, three pieces being twenty-pound Parrotts. The Commander-in-Chief of the confederate forces was Brigadier-General Churchill; Captain Ben. Johnson, Adjutant-General, Captain Wolf, Chief Quartermaster, Captain Little and Captain Brown, aids. Brigade commanders were Colonel Deshler, Colonel Garland, and Colonel Portlock. There was also a large number of captains and lieutenants. They will be sent to Cairo this morning. Our loss in the engagement was about one hundred killed, and five hundred wounded, who go up on the steamer January. To-day they are digging the graves and collecting the dead for burial. Fifty or more additional corpses have been found in the woods far back, evidently skulkers from the rebel army, killed by our shell. Prisoners are also constantly brought in, overtaken twelve or fifteen miles away. Of the entire force garrisoning the Fort, one thousand, mostly Texas c
Milliken's Bend (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
he forces of which, in pursuance of the order of Major-General Grant, commanding the department of the Tennessee, I assumed command on the fourth inst., at Milliken's Bend, La., resulting in the reduction of Fort Hindman, more generally known as Post Arkansas. These forces, styled by me for convenience and propriety of descriptagainst us in the engagement of which [ am giving an account. Without turning my arms in this direction, my forces must have continued comparatively idle, at Milliken's Bend, until you should have altered your plan for the reduction of Vicksburgh, or recalled them. Landing at intervals to supply my transports with fuel cut fromuis, and utterly destroying all of the enemy's defences, together with all buildings used by him for military purposes, I reembarked my command and sailed for Milliken's Bend on the seventeenth instant, in obedience to Major-Gen. Grant's orders. Noticing the conduct of the officers and men who took part in the battle of the Arka
dead men were much disfigured, evidently killed by shell — some ripped open, and their bowels upon the ground, others with heads cut open or limbs torn off. The rebel soldiers were gathered in crowds, evidently not much disheartened at being taken. They were composed of the following regiments: Twenty-fourth Texas, dismounted cavalry, Col. Wilkes; Twenty-fifth, same, Colonel Gillespie; Fifteenth, same, Colonel Sweet; Sixth Texas infantry, Colonel Garland, Colonel Taylor's regiment, and Colonel Darnel's. Six of the nine guns in the Fort belonged to Captain Hart's Arkansas battery, three pieces being twenty-pound Parrotts. The Commander-in-Chief of the confederate forces was Brigadier-General Churchill; Captain Ben. Johnson, Adjutant-General, Captain Wolf, Chief Quartermaster, Captain Little and Captain Brown, aids. Brigade commanders were Colonel Deshler, Colonel Garland, and Colonel Portlock. There was also a large number of captains and lieutenants. They will be sent to Cai
T. W. Sherman (search for this): chapter 110
he following order: The Fifteenth corps, Major-Gen. Sherman commanding, forming the right wing, righ one of the gunboats. Communicating with Gen. Sherman, I suggested to him the elegibility of the or Hammond, Assistant Adjutant-General of General Sherman's corps, brought information from him, thhe ground I wished him to occupy, I ordered Gen. Sherman to move Gen. Stuart's division to the rightabout the cantonments, he had captured. As Gen. Sherman had not yet advanced to the bayou, I hastenwamp, except a detachment of it, left under Gen. Sherman's order, to make a feint in the direction oes A. Smith and T. K. Smith's brigades of General Sherman's corps, had crossed in double-quick timen it was ordered up. Having reenforced General Sherman, at his request, at a quarter-past three action, assigned it to that officer. To General Sherman I gave charge of all the other defences aistrusted. An alteration was needed, and General Sherman was not superseded a moment two soon. Ge[8 more...]
William D. Wood (search for this): chapter 110
Courcy commanding, was held in reserve, while the remaining brigade of the same division, Colonel Lindsay commanding, was disposed on the opposite side of the river, as already explained. Company A, First regiment Illinois light artillery, Captain Wood commanding, was posted to the left of General Stuart's division, on the road leading into the Post. Company B, of the same regiment, Captain Barrett commanding, was posted in the centre of the same division; the Fourth Ohio battery, Captain Hut continued upon the field in the gallant discharge of duty; General Thayer lost his horse, which was shot under him, and Colonel G. A. Smith and T. K. Smith led their commands in a manner challenging the commendation of their superior officers. Wood's and Barrett's batteries also performed valuable service; Hoffman's battery was advanced within two hundred yards of the enemy's intrenchments, and poured in a rapid and effective fire from three successive positions. It was now three o'clock P.
Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 110
ndown the army were hurrying in the cavalry and artillery. I herewith inclose the report of the commanding officers and a list of killed and wounded, and take another occasion to mention to the department the names of those officers who have distinguished themselves particularly, though it is hard to discriminate when all did their duty so well. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Acting Rear-Admiral Commanding Mississippi Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Report of Lieutenant Commanding Owen. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Louisville, off Arkansas Post, Arkansas River, January 14, 1863. sir: I have the honor to transmit the report of killed and wounded on board this vessel, the damages sustained from the enemy's guns, and the amount of ammunition expended during the engagements of yesterday and to-day with the enemy's batteries at Arkansas Post. The damage sustained in the
Thomas Jackson (search for this): chapter 110
ommander Mississippi Squadron. United States Mississippi Squadron. Arkansas River, Ark., January 11, 1863. sir: The following is a list of the killed and wounded on board the United States gunboat Louisville: Fred. H. Gilhardy, seaman, wounded in the head, mortally; Adam Bradshaw, seaman, wounded in the thorax, mortally; James Mulheinn, seaman, wounded in the thigh, severely; Jas. Sullivan, seaman, contusion of thorax and abdomen; Thos. Spencer, seaman, wounded in elbow, slightly; Thomas Jackson, seaman, wounded in leg, slightly; Albert Mowry, seaman, wounded in knee, slightly; Jas. Blaisdale, seaman, wounded in hand, slightly; Geo. Holmes, seaman, contusion of shoulder, slightly; J. T. Blatchford, ensign, wounded in leg, severely; Walter Williams, seaman, killed. W. D. Hoffman, A. A. Surgeon. Report of Lieutenant Commanding Walker. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Baron De Kalb, Arkansas Post, January 12, 1863. sir: I have the honor to repo
ark to do any thing, all the vessels dropped down and tied up to the bank for the night. The Baron De Kalb, Lieutenant Commanding Walker; Louisville, Lieutenant Commanding Owen; and the Cincinnati, Lieutenant Commanding Bache, led the attack, and when hotly engaged I brought up the light-draft vessels, the Lexington and Black Ho cut off the enemy's retreat by the only way he had to get off. By this time all the guns in the Fort were completely silenced by the Louisville, Lieutenant Commanding E. R. Owen, Baron De Kalb, and Cincinnati, and I ordered the Black Hawk up for the purpose of boarding it in front. Being unmanageable, she had to be kept up t, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Acting Rear-Admiral Commanding Mississippi Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Report of Lieutenant Commanding Owen. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Louisville, off Arkansas Post, Arkansas River, January 14, 1863. sir: I have the hono
Antonio Uroa (search for this): chapter 110
the surgeon's report of killed and wounded on board the United States gunboat Baron De Kalb, in the attack on Arkansas Post, January eleventh, 1863: John Ryan, landsman, killed; Theo. Bender, third-class boy, severely wounded, probably mortal; Peter Olton, coxswain; Geo. Smith, seaman, severely; Jos. Bader, seaman; Jno. Farren, seaman; William Smith, seaman; M. C. Doreohs, slightly wounded; Wm. Swisler, seaman; Joseph H. Malon, seaman; Alfred H. Boyle, yeoman; Oscar Jordan, seaman; Antonio de Uroa, seaman; Geo. Fales, seaman; William Kelley, seaman; Pierre Leon, seaman; John Glenn, seaman. John wise, Acting Assistant Surgeon. To Jno. G. Walker, Lieutenant Commanding. Report of Lieutenant Commanding Bache. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Cincinnati, off Arkansas Post, January 12, 1863. sir: I have the honor to report having sustained no serious damage in the attack on the tenth. One shell struck us at the water-line forward, and a second went
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