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lso instructed to watch the right bank of the bayou to guard against, or at least to give notice of a flank attack. Colonel Shepard, of the Third Missouri, followed him, supported by the Thirty-first Iowa, under Col. Smyth. Next to the left, and i anticipated, and was compelled to divert his whole regiment from its original course to repel this assault, leaving Colonel Shepard in the advance on the original line. The Seventy-sixth Ohio, under Colonel Woods, moved off on the double-quick in on our flank, early attracted my attention. Here I ordered a charge on the enemy's works by the Third Missouri, under Col. Shepard, supported by the Thirty-first Iowa, commanded by Colonel Smyth. They moved forward vigorously, and for a time I confted, and therefore not guarded by Colonel Hassendeubel's sharp-shooters, checked the charge, and at length compelled Colonels Shepard and Smyth to resume their original line of battle. Colonel Hassendeubel, with his regiment of sharp-shooters, con
John G. Walker (search for this): chapter 110
ark to do any thing, all the vessels dropped down and tied up to the bank for the night. The Baron De Kalb, Lieutenant Commanding Walker; Louisville, Lieutenant Commanding Owen; and the Cincinnati, Lieutenant Commanding Bache, led the attack, and Fort. The condition of the Fort attests the accuracy of fire, and the persons inside give the Baron De Kalb, Lieutenant Commander Walker, the credit of doing the most execution. I was informed again this morning by Gen. McClernand, that the armnsign, wounded in leg, severely; Walter Williams, seaman, killed. W. D. Hoffman, A. A. Surgeon. Report of Lieutenant Commanding Walker. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Baron De Kalb, Arkansas Post, January 12, 1863 Inclosed I send the surgeon's report of killed and wounded. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, John G. Walker, Lieutenant Commanding U. S.N. Acting Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi Squadron. Annexed is the
E. B. Brown (search for this): chapter 110
ismounted cavalry, Col. Wilkes; Twenty-fifth, same, Colonel Gillespie; Fifteenth, same, Colonel Sweet; Sixth Texas infantry, Colonel Garland, Colonel Taylor's regiment, and Colonel Darnel's. Six of the nine guns in the Fort belonged to Captain Hart's Arkansas battery, three pieces being twenty-pound Parrotts. The Commander-in-Chief of the confederate forces was Brigadier-General Churchill; Captain Ben. Johnson, Adjutant-General, Captain Wolf, Chief Quartermaster, Captain Little and Captain Brown, aids. Brigade commanders were Colonel Deshler, Colonel Garland, and Colonel Portlock. There was also a large number of captains and lieutenants. They will be sent to Cairo this morning. Our loss in the engagement was about one hundred killed, and five hundred wounded, who go up on the steamer January. To-day they are digging the graves and collecting the dead for burial. Fifty or more additional corpses have been found in the woods far back, evidently skulkers from the rebel a
William Kelley (search for this): chapter 110
n board the United States gunboat Baron De Kalb, in the attack on Arkansas Post, January eleventh, 1863: John Ryan, landsman, killed; Theo. Bender, third-class boy, severely wounded, probably mortal; Peter Olton, coxswain; Geo. Smith, seaman, severely; Jos. Bader, seaman; Jno. Farren, seaman; William Smith, seaman; M. C. Doreohs, slightly wounded; Wm. Swisler, seaman; Joseph H. Malon, seaman; Alfred H. Boyle, yeoman; Oscar Jordan, seaman; Antonio de Uroa, seaman; Geo. Fales, seaman; William Kelley, seaman; Pierre Leon, seaman; John Glenn, seaman. John wise, Acting Assistant Surgeon. To Jno. G. Walker, Lieutenant Commanding. Report of Lieutenant Commanding Bache. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Cincinnati, off Arkansas Post, January 12, 1863. sir: I have the honor to report having sustained no serious damage in the attack on the tenth. One shell struck us at the water-line forward, and a second went through the upper works. We were equally fo
near the rebel position, Arkansas Post beyond, around a bend, and as it was a favorable spot for disembarking, the fleet drew near shore. Night had come on, and orders were given to wait until morning, meanwhile throwing out strong pickets. The fields of Haunted farm, a great plantation with a large half-ruined house and numerous negro huts, were chosen to debark upon. Among the slaves it was considered a spirit rendezvous. Goblins damned danced at midnight on the deserted cotton-fields, Luna gazing, occasionally flushed blood-red in anger, spirits of defunct negroes cried in the branches, and hens, those staunch friends of good wives, left off their agreeable lays and went to crowing whenever persons near were threatened by death. John, a negro servant, on board our vessel, the Ella, had a nightmare in consequence, and woke us at twelve o'clock by his loud cries. A better feeling already pervaded the army, and night settled down clear and beautiful. Constant chopping resound
F. H. Wilson (search for this): chapter 110
ong the bayou, and cut off the enemy's escape in that direction. Colonel Lindsay, as soon as a gunboat had passed above the Fort, hastened with his brigade down the opposite shore, and opened an oblique fire from Foster's two twenty, and Lieutenant Wilson's two ten-pounder Parrott's, into the enemy's line of rifle-pits, carrying away his battle-flag and killing a number of his men. Eager to do still more, he embarked the Third Kentucky on board of one of the gunboats to cross the river to thveness through lack of discipline. This and the Twenty-fifth Iowa are now regiments. I should not do full justice did I close this report without making honorable mention of my staff-officers, Capt. F. M. Crandal, Lieuts. J. E. Bryant, and F. H. Wilson, and Sergeant Sid. C. Morgan. Inclosed are lists of casualties in the several regiments. I have the honor to be, respectfully, Your obedient servant, Charles E. Hovey, Brigadier-General. F. M. Crandal, A. A.G. To Captain J. W. Paddock
owing troops : First division. Brigadier-General F. Steele, commanding. First brigade, Brig it, consisting of Gen. Hovey's brigade, of Gen. Steele's division, after meeting and dispersing a and successfully done. After the rear of Gen. Steele's division, consisting of General Blair's bonal observation. Seeing at once, that for Gen. Steele's division to go forward on a line so extenno time in gaining the bayou. Meanwhile, Gen. Steele's division had recrossed the swamp, except n, and were ready to commence the attack. General Steele's division formed the extreme right of the, between Thayer's and Hovey's brigades of General Steele's division. The First Missouri horse arSherman's command, who immediately ordered General Steele, whose zeal and daring added to his previoactical skill and strategic talent; while Generals Steele, Smith, Osterhaus, and Stuart, and the serps held the right, disposed as follows: In Gen. Steele's division, Gen. Hovey's brigade holding th[5 more...]
Jonathan Farren (search for this): chapter 110
very respectfully, your obedient servant, John G. Walker, Lieutenant Commanding U. S.N. Acting Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi Squadron. Annexed is the surgeon's report of killed and wounded on board the United States gunboat Baron De Kalb, in the attack on Arkansas Post, January eleventh, 1863: John Ryan, landsman, killed; Theo. Bender, third-class boy, severely wounded, probably mortal; Peter Olton, coxswain; Geo. Smith, seaman, severely; Jos. Bader, seaman; Jno. Farren, seaman; William Smith, seaman; M. C. Doreohs, slightly wounded; Wm. Swisler, seaman; Joseph H. Malon, seaman; Alfred H. Boyle, yeoman; Oscar Jordan, seaman; Antonio de Uroa, seaman; Geo. Fales, seaman; William Kelley, seaman; Pierre Leon, seaman; John Glenn, seaman. John wise, Acting Assistant Surgeon. To Jno. G. Walker, Lieutenant Commanding. Report of Lieutenant Commanding Bache. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Cincinnati, off Arkansas Post, January
W. J. Landrum (search for this): chapter 110
Indiana, Twenty-third Wisconsin, Eighty-third Ohio, Sixty-seventh Indiana, Ninety-sixth Ohio. Second brigade, Colonel W. J. Landrum, commanding--Nineteenth Kentucky, Seventy-seventh Illinois, Forty-eighth Ohio, Ninety-seventh Illinois, One Hundr works had been visibly damaged by the fire of artillery, General A. J. Smith deployed nine regiments of Burbridge's and Landrum's brigades, supported by three regiments in reserve, and steadily moving forward, drove the enemy's advance toward the o gunboats, being sharp and general on both sides, I ordered an assault. Burbridge's brigade with the two regiments of Landrum's which had been sent to its right, and the One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio of Colonel Sheldon's brigade bearing the brunnd G. K. Smith's the left. The General Morgan's corps holding the army's left. A. J. Smith's division, Burbridge's and Landrum's brigades, Sheldon's brigade, in Osterhaus's division, resting on the river-bank, the extreme left. Gens. Lindsay's an
Giles A. Smith (search for this): chapter 110
nd division. Brigadier--General D. Stuart, commanding First brigade--Colonel G. A. Smith, commanding--Eighth Missouri, Sixth Missouri, One Hundred and Thirteentho cease firing. By half-past 1 o'clock Hovey's and Thayer's brigades and Giles A. Smith and T. K. Smith's brigades of General Sherman's corps, had crossed in doublge of duty; General Thayer lost his horse, which was shot under him, and Colonel G. A. Smith and T. K. Smith led their commands in a manner challenging the commendatods. Almost instantly rapid musketry told them engaged. The balance of General G. A. Smith's brigade followed. On those earthworks the rebels had placed logs, bets the centre, and Gen. Blair's the left. In Gen. Stuart's division, Acting Gen. G. A. Smith's brigade the right and G. K. Smith's the left. The General Morgan's ourth Iowa regiments, and First Iowa battery, who suffered severely. Acting-General G. A. Smith's brigade was warmly engaged, and he, also, while leading at the extr
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