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James Sullivan (search for this): chapter 110
t servant. E. K. Owen. Lieutenant Commanding United States Navy. To Acting Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commander Mississippi Squadron. United States Mississippi Squadron. Arkansas River, Ark., January 11, 1863. sir: The following is a list of the killed and wounded on board the United States gunboat Louisville: Fred. H. Gilhardy, seaman, wounded in the head, mortally; Adam Bradshaw, seaman, wounded in the thorax, mortally; James Mulheinn, seaman, wounded in the thigh, severely; Jas. Sullivan, seaman, contusion of thorax and abdomen; Thos. Spencer, seaman, wounded in elbow, slightly; Thomas Jackson, seaman, wounded in leg, slightly; Albert Mowry, seaman, wounded in knee, slightly; Jas. Blaisdale, seaman, wounded in hand, slightly; Geo. Holmes, seaman, contusion of shoulder, slightly; J. T. Blatchford, ensign, wounded in leg, severely; Walter Williams, seaman, killed. W. D. Hoffman, A. A. Surgeon. Report of Lieutenant Commanding Walker. United States Mississippi Squa
d and fifty. The mortality among horses was remarkable, eight or more of the mangled bodies lying around. Most of the dead men were much disfigured, evidently killed by shell — some ripped open, and their bowels upon the ground, others with heads cut open or limbs torn off. The rebel soldiers were gathered in crowds, evidently not much disheartened at being taken. They were composed of the following regiments: Twenty-fourth Texas, dismounted cavalry, Col. Wilkes; Twenty-fifth, same, Colonel Gillespie; Fifteenth, same, Colonel Sweet; Sixth Texas infantry, Colonel Garland, Colonel Taylor's regiment, and Colonel Darnel's. Six of the nine guns in the Fort belonged to Captain Hart's Arkansas battery, three pieces being twenty-pound Parrotts. The Commander-in-Chief of the confederate forces was Brigadier-General Churchill; Captain Ben. Johnson, Adjutant-General, Captain Wolf, Chief Quartermaster, Captain Little and Captain Brown, aids. Brigade commanders were Colonel Deshler, Colo
David L. Caldwell (search for this): chapter 110
essful officers. The members of my staff present--Col. Stewart, Chief of Cavalry; Lieut.-Col. Schwartz, Inspector General; Lieut.-Colonel Dunlap, A. Q.M.; Major McMillen, Medical Director; Major Ramsey; Captain Freeman, and Lieutenants Jones, Caldwell and Jayne, Aids-de-camp — all rendered valuable assistance. Lieut. Caldwell, who ascended into the top of a lofty tree in full view of the enemy and within range of his fire, and gave me momentary information of the operations both of our land Lieut. Caldwell, who ascended into the top of a lofty tree in full view of the enemy and within range of his fire, and gave me momentary information of the operations both of our land and naval forces and of the enemy, particularly challenges my commendation and thanks. To Col. Parsons, A. Q.M., and master of transports, I also offer my acknowledgments, not only for the successful discharge of arduous duties in his department, but for important services as volunteer aid, in bearing orders in the face of danger, on the field. And to Major Williams, Surgeon of the Second Illinois light artillery, I am also indebted for professional usefulness. The maps and drawings here
S. G. Burbridge (search for this): chapter 110
gadier-General A. J. Smith, commanding. First brigade, Brig.-Gen. S. G. Burbridge, commanding--Sixtieth Indiana, Sixteenth Indiana, Twenty-fire of artillery, General A. J. Smith deployed nine regiments of Burbridge's and Landrum's brigades, supported by three regiments in reserve, being sharp and general on both sides, I ordered an assault. Burbridge's brigade with the two regiments of Landrum's which had been senthn M. Orr, with the Eighty-third Ohio, Lieut.-Colonel Baldwin, of Burbridge's brigade, and the One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio, Colonel D. Frenter the Fort. Presenting himself at the entrance of the Fort, Gen. Burbridge was halted by the guard, who denied that they had surrendered ured by Captain Ennis, one of General Smith's aids-de-camp. General Burbridge planted the American flag upon the Fort which had been placed Morgan's corps holding the army's left. A. J. Smith's division, Burbridge's and Landrum's brigades, Sheldon's brigade, in Osterhaus's divis
John M. Orr (search for this): chapter 110
further to the right; and the engagement, notwithstanding the guns of the Fort had been silenced by the combined fire of my artillery and the gunboats, being sharp and general on both sides, I ordered an assault. Burbridge's brigade with the two regiments of Landrum's which had been sent to its right, and the One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio of Colonel Sheldon's brigade bearing the brunt, dashed forward under a deadly fire quite to the enemy's intrenchments, the Sixteenth Indiana, Lieut.-Col. John M. Orr, with the Eighty-third Ohio, Lieut.-Colonel Baldwin, of Burbridge's brigade, and the One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio, Colonel D. French, of Colonel Sheldon's brigade, being the first to enter the Fort. Presenting himself at the entrance of the Fort, Gen. Burbridge was halted by the guard, who denied that they had surrendered until he called their attention to the white flag, and ordered them to ground their arms. Immediately after, meeting General Churchill, commandant of the post,
Frank P. Blair (search for this): chapter 110
division. Brigadier-General F. Steele, commanding. First brigade, Brig.-Gen. Frank P. Blair, commanding--Thirteenth Illinois, Twenty-ninth Missouri, Thirty-firstccessfully done. After the rear of Gen. Steele's division, consisting of General Blair's brigade, had crossed the swamp, Major Hammond, Assistant Adjutant-GeneralSteele's division. The First Missouri horse artillery was in reserve, with Gen. Blair's brigade; and the Eighth Ohio battery was posted in the rear of the centre ohe enemy's works, they boldly resumed and continued their advance, supported by Blair's brigade, as a reserve, until they had approached within short musket-range ofas an impassable ravine in the way. Col. De Courcy's brigade, which with General Blair's had borne the brunt of the repulse near Vicksburgh, was left near the travision, Gen. Hovey's brigade holding the right, Gen. Thayer's the centre, and Gen. Blair's the left. In Gen. Stuart's division, Acting Gen. G. A. Smith's brigade t
J. E. Bryant (search for this): chapter 110
the majority of his regiment, acted like veterans, but the cowardly conduct of his Major in leaving the field in the face of the enemy, thereby giving countenance to straggling and skulking, cannot be too severely censured. The Thirty-first Iowa lost much of its effectiveness through lack of discipline. This and the Twenty-fifth Iowa are now regiments. I should not do full justice did I close this report without making honorable mention of my staff-officers, Capt. F. M. Crandal, Lieuts. J. E. Bryant, and F. H. Wilson, and Sergeant Sid. C. Morgan. Inclosed are lists of casualties in the several regiments. I have the honor to be, respectfully, Your obedient servant, Charles E. Hovey, Brigadier-General. F. M. Crandal, A. A.G. To Captain J. W. Paddock, A. A. General First Division, Fifteenth Army Corps. Report of rear-admiral Porter. United States Mississippi Squadron, Arkansas Post, Jan. 11, 1863. sir: I have the honor to inform you that on the fourth of January
those of the poor white trash greeted us, always built in rambling and roomy style, great porches, and surrounded by negro huts. The latter on these estates were much better than the majority of those belonging to white people. Old, sallow, wrinkled dames, drawn out by curiosity from their nests, and invariably knitting, would occasionally stand gazing at us, silent as if wooden blocks! Surrounded, framed as it were, by the house-moss, they seemed as much witches as those that brewed in Macbeth's time. Arkansas has never had an enviable name, and were the balance of it poor as that bordering its river, it would not be worth opening to trade. Truly, here's the land of the Arkansas traveller, where a good share of the native talent is devoted to fiddling. Impoverished and wretched, the people could apparently have no worse fate than being left to themselves. At places, corn-bins were built upon the river's bank, generally empty, their contents having been slid into boats benea
A. W. Barrett (search for this): chapter 110
ide of the river, as already explained. Company A, First regiment Illinois light artillery, Captain Wood commanding, was posted to the left of General Stuart's division, on the road leading into the Post. Company B, of the same regiment, Captain Barrett commanding, was posted in the centre of the same division; the Fourth Ohio battery, Captain Hoffman commanding, in the interval between General Stuart's and General Steele's divisions, and the First Iowa battery, Capt. Griffiths commanding, upon the field in the gallant discharge of duty; General Thayer lost his horse, which was shot under him, and Colonel G. A. Smith and T. K. Smith led their commands in a manner challenging the commendation of their superior officers. Wood's and Barrett's batteries also performed valuable service; Hoffman's battery was advanced within two hundred yards of the enemy's intrenchments, and poured in a rapid and effective fire from three successive positions. It was now three o'clock P. M. The a
ne ten-inch shrapnel, seventy eight-inch shells, and thirty-seven thirty-two-pounder shells. Inclosed I send the surgeon's report of killed and wounded. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, John G. Walker, Lieutenant Commanding U. S.N. Acting Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi Squadron. Annexed is the surgeon's report of killed and wounded on board the United States gunboat Baron De Kalb, in the attack on Arkansas Post, January eleventh, 1863: John Ryan, landsman, killed; Theo. Bender, third-class boy, severely wounded, probably mortal; Peter Olton, coxswain; Geo. Smith, seaman, severely; Jos. Bader, seaman; Jno. Farren, seaman; William Smith, seaman; M. C. Doreohs, slightly wounded; Wm. Swisler, seaman; Joseph H. Malon, seaman; Alfred H. Boyle, yeoman; Oscar Jordan, seaman; Antonio de Uroa, seaman; Geo. Fales, seaman; William Kelley, seaman; Pierre Leon, seaman; John Glenn, seaman. John wise, Acting Assistant Surgeon. To Jno. G. Walker,
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