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Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
y. It was a toilsome, dangerous, but successful march through a country unknown; having no guide, the troops struggled forward, and at five o'clock next morning reached the opposite side of the bend and commanded the river above. All Saturday the rebels had fired at intervals, whenever troops appeared in range on the banks, generally using Parrott missiles. Cooperating with the army was Rear-Admiral Porter, who had brought up three iron-clads and several mosquito vessels from his Mississippi fleet. The former were the Louisville, Lieutenant Commanding E. K. Owen; Cincinnati, Lieutenant Commanding Bache; and De Kalb, (old St. Louis,) Lieutenant Commanding Walker. The Admiral's flag-ship was the armed transport-steamer Uncle Sam. Saturday evening, at dusk, to determine the enemy's strength, the iron-clads were pushed forward, and engaged the Fort for an hour or two, each being struck, but with trifling loss of life. Sunday morning was occupied in getting the troops into
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
every thing was ready, and the Louisville, Baron de Kalb, and Cincinnati advanced to within four hundred yards of the Fort, which then opened fire from their heavy guns, and eight rifled guns and musketry. The superiority of our fire was soon manifested. The batteries were silenced, and we ceased firing; but no assault took place, and it being too dark to do any thing, all the vessels dropped down and tied up to the bank for the night. The Baron De Kalb, Lieutenant Commanding Walker; Louisville, Lieutenant Commanding Owen; and the Cincinnati, Lieutenant Commanding Bache, led the attack, and when hotly engaged I brought up the light-draft vessels, the Lexington and Black Hawk, to throw in shrapnel and rifle-shell. The fire was very destructive, killing nearly all the artillery horses in and about the fort. When the battery was pretty well silenced, I ordered Lieutenant Commanding Smith to pass the Fort in the light-draft iron-clad Rattler, and enfilade it, which he did in a ve
Fayetteville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
h then a great portion of the baggage-train. These effected an exit on the night our forces were surrounding the place, and before it could be fully accomplished. The results of the victory are about four thousand live hundred prisoners, about the same number stand of arms, and twenty guns. The post was an important one, and Gen. Churchill affirms he had orders to hold it to the last. Little Rock and the whole State are now open to us whenever we wish to move. Duval's Bluff, on the White River, has probably fallen ere this, under the attack of Gen. Gorman, and thus two tributaries of supply are shut to the rebels. These movements, although presenting no very brilliant victories, are yet the surest way at present of crippling the rebellion. When unable, for want of subsistence, to mass their armies in one or two strongholds, they will have to come out of Vicksburgh and Richmond, and offer battle. The policy of letting them choose their own places for defence, exhaust milita
De Kalb, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
, and at five o'clock next morning reached the opposite side of the bend and commanded the river above. All Saturday the rebels had fired at intervals, whenever troops appeared in range on the banks, generally using Parrott missiles. Cooperating with the army was Rear-Admiral Porter, who had brought up three iron-clads and several mosquito vessels from his Mississippi fleet. The former were the Louisville, Lieutenant Commanding E. K. Owen; Cincinnati, Lieutenant Commanding Bache; and De Kalb, (old St. Louis,) Lieutenant Commanding Walker. The Admiral's flag-ship was the armed transport-steamer Uncle Sam. Saturday evening, at dusk, to determine the enemy's strength, the iron-clads were pushed forward, and engaged the Fort for an hour or two, each being struck, but with trifling loss of life. Sunday morning was occupied in getting the troops into position and preparing for our struggle. The enemy, finding themselves outnumbered, had abandoned all their outer works, and
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
he Post of Arkansas, and requested my cooperation. I detailed three in iron-clads — the Louisville, Baron de Kalb, and Cincinnati — with all the light-draft gunboats, all of which had to be towed up the river. On the ninth we ascended the Arkansafternoon, Gen. McClernand sent me a message, stating that every thing was ready, and the Louisville, Baron de Kalb, and Cincinnati advanced to within four hundred yards of the Fort, which then opened fire from their heavy guns, and eight rifled guns l the guns in the Fort were completely silenced by the Louisville, Lieutenant Commanding E. R. Owen, Baron De Kalb, and Cincinnati, and I ordered the Black Hawk up for the purpose of boarding it in front. Being unmanageable, she had to be kept up thseveral mosquito vessels from his Mississippi fleet. The former were the Louisville, Lieutenant Commanding E. K. Owen; Cincinnati, Lieutenant Commanding Bache; and De Kalb, (old St. Louis,) Lieutenant Commanding Walker. The Admiral's flag-ship was
Fletchers Landing (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
vision had recrossed the swamp, except a detachment of it, left under Gen. Sherman's order, to make a feint in the direction of the bridge mentioned. During the night, Gen. Osterhaus bivouacked his division near the landing, in a position commanding the neighboring approaches across the swamp, and covering our transports against possible attack from the opposite side of the river. On the night of the ninth, Col. Lindsay's brigade had disembarked nine miles below Notrib's farm, at Fletcher's Landing, on the right bank of the river, in pursuance of General Morgan's order, and marching across a bight of the river, had taken position, and planted a battery on the bank above the Fort — equally cutting off the escape or reenforcement of the enemy by water. This was accomplished early on the tenth inst., and formed an important part of my original plan; for the prompt and skilful execution of which, I accord to Colonel Lindsay great credit. Passing a cold night without fires and ten
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
h Kentucky, Seventy-seventh Illinois, Forty-eighth Ohio, Ninety-seventh Illinois, One Hundred and Eighth Illinois, One Hundred and Thirty-first Illinois, Eighty-ninth Indiana, infantry. Artillery--Seventeenth Ohio battery, Captain Blount, and Illinois Mercantile battery, Captain Cooley. Cavalry--One company Fourth Indiana. Second division. Brigadier-General P. I. Osterhaus, commanding. First brigade, Col. L. A. Shelden, commanding--Sixtieth Indiana, One Hundred and Eighteenth Illinf the same division, Col. De Courcy commanding, was held in reserve, while the remaining brigade of the same division, Colonel Lindsay commanding, was disposed on the opposite side of the river, as already explained. Company A, First regiment Illinois light artillery, Captain Wood commanding, was posted to the left of General Stuart's division, on the road leading into the Post. Company B, of the same regiment, Captain Barrett commanding, was posted in the centre of the same division; the Fo
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
of Fort Hindman, more generally known as Post Arkansas. These forces, styled by me for convenience key to Little Rock, the capital of the State of Arkansas, and the extensive and valuable country nth we ascended the Arkansas River as high as Arkansas Post, when the army landed within about four rday and to-day with the enemy's batteries at Arkansas Post. The damage sustained in the hull, as suadron. Missouri Republican account. Arkansas Post, January 12. The eighth found our fleches as those that brewed in Macbeth's time. Arkansas has never had an enviable name, and were the ning to trade. Truly, here's the land of the Arkansas traveller, where a good share of the native tod authority for stating that the attack upon Arkansas Post was made without authority of, or suggeseature of this battle was that Texas defended Arkansas. All but a thousand of the men were from the Yankee steamer Nebraska, Off the post of Arkansas, Wednesday, January 14, 1863. Editors Richmon[12 more...]
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 110
the capital of the State of Arkansas, and the extensive and valuable country drained by the Arkansas River, and from which hostile detachments were constantly sent forth to obstruct the navigation ofcommands upon their transports, up that river to the cut-off, and through it into and up the Arkansas River to a suitable point on the left bank of the same, near and below Post Arkansas for disembarkt-draft gunboats, all of which had to be towed up the river. On the ninth we ascended the Arkansas River as high as Arkansas Post, when the army landed within about four miles of the Fort. The ene United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Louisville, off Arkansas Post, Arkansas River, January 14, 1863. sir: I have the honor to transmit the report of killed and wounded on dmiral David D. Porter, Commander Mississippi Squadron. United States Mississippi Squadron. Arkansas River, Ark., January 11, 1863. sir: The following is a list of the killed and wounded on board
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
laboriously and skilfully enlarged and strengthened, since the commencement of the rebellion; which formed the key to Little Rock, the capital of the State of Arkansas, and the extensive and valuable country drained by the Arkansas River, and from was settled by the French in 1685, is fifty miles above the mouth of the river; one hundred and seventeen miles below Little Rock, and is surrounded by a fruitful country, abounding in cattle, corn, and cotton. Fort Hindman, a square full-bastioeast and north-east, and to the bayou and river on the west and south. This plateau, crossed by the Brownsville and Little Rock road, embraced the enemy's cantonment, his principal defences and the field of action of this day, which covered a spams, and twenty guns. The post was an important one, and Gen. Churchill affirms he had orders to hold it to the last. Little Rock and the whole State are now open to us whenever we wish to move. Duval's Bluff, on the White River, has probably fall
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