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Brownsville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
t was a deep ravine, entering the river at right angles and extending inland in different arms, in front of the left of our line. In front of the centre of the line was an open field. This strip of high land afforded the only available approach from our landing to the enemy's defences, and above the second line of rifle-pits, expanded into a dry plateau, extending to the swamp on the east and north-east, and to the bayou and river on the west and south. This plateau, crossed by the Brownsville and Little Rock road, embraced the enemy's cantonment, his principal defences and the field of action of this day, which covered a space of about one thousand yards square. Having placed in battery, at the request of Admiral Porter, two twenty-pounder Parrotts, as already explained, for the purpose of dismounting the gun in the lower casemate, which had seriously annoyed the gunboats on the previous evening, and all my forces being ready for action, I sent word to the Admiral, accordin
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
utenant Lee Morgan received a ball through the face. Capt. Jameson, wounded in arm at an early moment, refused to retire, and fearlessly led his men through the action. Lieut. B. W. Musselman, although on the sick list, joined his company and did good service. In General Morgan's corps matters went equally favorable. That leader, fearless and skilful, handled his troops well. All the Brigadier-Generals did their duty. Among the batteries most constantly engaged, was Taylor's, from Chicago. Twice charges were made by different commands, but so severe was the musketry directed upon them, that they fell back before getting to the works. The fire from the river fort for some time become feeble, suddenly ceased. The fleet was victorious at that point, and the principal dependence silenced, its bomb-proofs battered to pieces, and every heavy gun either dismounted or broken in two. Thirty artillerists lay dead within the walls, and the few stout buildings intended for protection
Fredericksburgh (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
aces for defence, exhaust military ingenuity in fortifying positions by nature almost inaccessible, then hurl our men madly forward under a dozen disadvantages, should, if disastrous warnings can penetrate the mind of Gen. Halleck, be abandoned. I have good authority for stating that the attack upon Arkansas Post was made without authority of, or suggestion by, the authorities at Washington. Those worthies were apparently busily occupied seeing that the hospitals before Vicksburgh and Fredericksburgh were well filled. I mention but facts in saying that the feeling in this army against what they consider Halleck's blundering career, is universal and bitter. The soldiers are now busy destroying the works here, and burning the barracks. Every ditch has been dragged by adventurous ones in search of hidden property, and several hundred pistols and swords brought forth. Under floors, in hollow trees, everywhere that opportunity offered, the rebels concealed what they could. Their
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 110
enant Commanding Owen. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Louisville, off Arkansas Post, Arkansas River, January The following is a list of the killed and wounded on board the United States gunboat Louisville: Fred. H. Gilhardy, seaman, wounded in thant Commanding Walker. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Baron De Kalb, Arkansas Post, January 12, 1863. sir:ully, your obedient servant, John G. Walker, Lieutenant Commanding U. S.N. Acting Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi Squadronexed is the surgeon's report of killed and wounded on board the United States gunboat Baron De Kalb, in the attack on Arkansas Post, January nant Commanding Bache. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Cincinnati, off Arkansas Post, January 12, 1863. sirnant Commanding Shirk. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Lexington, off Post of Arkansas, Arkansas River, Januar
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
er they had retired from the neighborhood of Vicksburgh, I sailed with them, the same day, in execut have altered your plan for the reduction of Vicksburgh, or recalled them. Landing at intervals tir's had borne the brunt of the repulse near Vicksburgh, was left near the transports to protect the its way back from the ill-planned attack at Vicksburgh, opposite the mouth of White River. There wng looked favorable, and feeling saddened at Vicksburgh became cheerful again. Habitations were fewing change from the blundering expedition of Vicksburgh. Within the walls were strewed dead and wouo strongholds, they will have to come out of Vicksburgh and Richmond, and offer battle. The policy ly occupied seeing that the hospitals before Vicksburgh and Fredericksburgh were well filled. I menll, it is hoped, be to again operate against Vicksburgh, this time assisted by General Grant. On should be dead. We have fought the whole Vicksburgh expedition, and we are now all prisoners of
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
have been found in the woods far back, evidently skulkers from the rebel army, killed by our shell. Prisoners are also constantly brought in, overtaken twelve or fifteen miles away. Of the entire force garrisoning the Fort, one thousand, mostly Texas cavalry, escaped, taking with then a great portion of the baggage-train. These effected an exit on the night our forces were surrounding the place, and before it could be fully accomplished. The results of the victory are about four thousand se, hit by our heavy shot, were two of them broken off near the muzzle, another dismounted, while floors and frames around were clotted with blood as if a slaughter-house for cattle had existed there. A peculiar feature of this battle was that Texas defended Arkansas. All but a thousand of the men were from the former State. W. E. W. A rebel narrative. Yankee steamer Nebraska, Off the post of Arkansas, Wednesday, January 14, 1863. Editors Richmond Enquirer: The most remarkable b
White River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
found upon the bank, the army safely arrived at the mouth of the White River on the eighth inst. Henceforth its operations were controlled by corps commanders: First. Having arrived at the mouth of the White River, the commanders of army corps of the army of the Mississippi wilmbarkation. Second. The army will move from the mouth of the White River in the following order: The Fifteenth corps, Major-Gen. Sherman to Notrib's farm, three miles below the Fort, by the way of the White River, the cut-off and the Arkansas, my object was to deceive the enemfrom the ill-planned attack at Vicksburgh, opposite the mouth of White River. There was one change for the better, however. The troops, altken command in his place. At the mouth there was a pause, and White River's silent banks, its narrow channel entering into and losing itseping steam and snatches of songs. A few miles from the mouth of White River we entered the cut-off and passed into the Arkansas. These two
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 110
have to come out of Vicksburgh and Richmond, and offer battle. The policy of letting them choose their own places for defence, exhaust military ingenuity in fortifying positions by nature almost inaccessible, then hurl our men madly forward under a dozen disadvantages, should, if disastrous warnings can penetrate the mind of Gen. Halleck, be abandoned. I have good authority for stating that the attack upon Arkansas Post was made without authority of, or suggestion by, the authorities at Washington. Those worthies were apparently busily occupied seeing that the hospitals before Vicksburgh and Fredericksburgh were well filled. I mention but facts in saying that the feeling in this army against what they consider Halleck's blundering career, is universal and bitter. The soldiers are now busy destroying the works here, and burning the barracks. Every ditch has been dragged by adventurous ones in search of hidden property, and several hundred pistols and swords brought forth. Unde
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 110
Doc. 101.-battle of Arkansas Post. Report of Major-General McClernand. headquarters army of the Mississippi, steamer Tigress, Miss. River, January 20, 1863. Lieut.-Colonel John A. Rawlins, A. A. General, Department of the Tennessee: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the forces of whiextensive and valuable country drained by the Arkansas River, and from which hostile detachments were constantly sent forth to obstruct the navigation of the Mississippi River and thereby our communications. A Government transport, the Blue Wing, laden with valuable military stores, only a few days before, fell prey to one of tht damaged. I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient servant, James W. Shirk, Lieutenant Commander. Assistant Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi River Squadron. Missouri Republican account. Arkansas Post, January 12. The eighth found our fleet on its way back from the ill-planned attack at Vicks
Little Prairie (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
which he might diverge at or near the levee, in making a detour for the purpose of investing the upper side of the Fort. His column was put in motion at eleven o'clock A. M., but diverging below that point, the head of it, consisting of Gen. Hovey's brigade, of Gen. Steele's division, after meeting and dispersing a strong picket of the enemy, soon encountered a swamp, about one fourth of a mile wide. Passing this swamp with much difficulty, the brigade rested upon an open space called Little Prairie. Riding up to the point where the brigade had entered the swamp, and witnessing its embarassment, I sent Col. Stewart, of my staff, and chief of cavalry, with my escort, to the left and front, to ascertain whether the embrasures now discovered, in that portion of the levee farthest from the river, were occupied by cannon, and to verify the practicability of the river-road. He soon reported that there were no cannon in the embrasures; that the levee had been held the night before, as
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