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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 112
n to be at home, nor had Europe yet learned what reliance was to be placed in the official statements of the Cabinet at Washington. The delegation of power granted by these States to the Federal government to represent them in foreign intercourse haexplanations from the British government. In a published despatch from Her Majesty's Foreign Office to her Minister at Washington, under date of February 11, 1862, occurs the following passage: Her Majesty's government, however, are of opiniono the whole mass of the people who are subjected to the despotism that now reigns with unbridled license in the city of Washington a willing acquiescence in its conduct of the war. There must necessarily exist among our enemies very many, perhaps a mf the true nature of the designs of the party which elevated to power the present occupant of the Presidential Chair at Washington, and which sought to conceal its purposes by every variety of artful device, and by the perfidious use of the most sole
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 112
ure times unfriendly discussions not now anticipated shall unfortunately arise between this Confederacy and some European power, the recollection of our forbearance under the grievances which I have enumerated may be evoked with happy influence in preventing any serious disturbance of peaceful relations. It would not be proper to close my remarks on the subject of our foreign relations without adverting to the fact that the correspondence between the Cabinets of France, Great Britain, and Russia, recently published, indicates a gratifying advance in the appreciation by those governments of the true interests of mankind, as involved in the war on this continent. It is to the enlightened ruler of the French nation that the public feeling of Europe is indebted for the first official exhibition of its sympathy for the sufferings endured by this people with so much heroism, of its horror at the awful carnage with which the progress of the war has been marked, and of its desire for a spe
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 112
the separation of these States from the former Union. Four of the States now members of the Confederacy were recognized by name as independent sovereignties in a treaty of peace concluded in the year 1783, with one of the two great maritime Powers of Western Europe, and had been prior to that period allies in war of the other. In the year 1778 they formed a union with nine other States under Articles of Confederation. Dissatisfied with that Union, three of them — Virginia, Carolina, and Georgia--together with eight of the States now members of the United States, seceded from it in 1789, and these eleven seceding State formed a second Union, although by the terms of the Articles o?? Confederation express provision was made that the first Union should be perpetual. Their right to secede, notwithstanding this provision, was never contested by the States from which they separated, nor made the subject of discussion with any third power. When, at a later period, North-Carolina accede
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 112
olina, and Georgia--together with eight of the States now members of the United States, seceded from it in 1789, and these eleven seceding State formed a second Union, although by the terms of the Articles o?? Confederation express provision was made that the first Union should be perpetual. Their right to secede, notwithstanding this provision, was never contested by the States from which they separated, nor made the subject of discussion with any third power. When, at a later period, North-Carolina acceded to that second Union, and when, still later, the other seven States, now members of this Confederacy, became also members of the same Union, it was upon the recognized footing of equal and independent sovereignties; nor had it then entered into the minds of men that sovereign States could be compelled by force to remain members of a confederation into which they had entered of their own free will, if at a subsequent period the defence of their safety and honor should, in their ju
th one of the two great maritime Powers of Western Europe, and had been prior to that period allies surd as they were known to be at home, nor had Europe yet learned what reliance was to be placed in represent them in foreign intercourse had led Europe into the grave error of supposing that their sing its progress. Some of the other powers of Europe pursued the same course of policy, and it becahad not been withheld by the action of neutral Europe. But it is especially in relation to the soder this invitation every independent State in Europe yielded its assent. At least no instance is kce during the whole period of the war. Neutral Europe remained passive when the United States--with ing its very existence, the neutral nations of Europe have pursued a policy, which, nominally impartately arise between this Confederacy and some European power, the recollection of our forbearance unur. According to the last advices received in Europe, the two armies were, on the contrary, in a co[16 more...]
France (France) (search for this): chapter 112
ations of the two parties as to the true nature of their previous mutual relations. The governments of Great Britain and France accordingly signified their determination to confine themselves to recognizing the self-evident fact of the existence of ng action on its demand for admission into the family of nations, recognized it as a belligerent power, Great Britain and France made informal proposals about the same time that their own rights as neutrals should be guaranteed by our acceding as belrks on the subject of our foreign relations without adverting to the fact that the correspondence between the Cabinets of France, Great Britain, and Russia, recently published, indicates a gratifying advance in the appreciation by those governments oilities the President of the United States repeated in formal official communication to the Cabinets of Great Britain and France that he was utterly without constitutional power to do the act which he has just committed, and that in no possible event
Galveston (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 112
McDowell, McClellan, and Pope. In the West, obstinate battles have been fought with varied fortunes, marked by frightful carnage on both sides; but the enemy's hopes of decisive results have again been baffled, while at Vicksburgh another formidable expedition has been repulsed, with inconsiderable loss on our side, and severe damage to the assailing forces. On the Atlantic coast the enemy has been unable to gain a footing beyond the protecting shelter of his fleets, and the city of Galveston has just been recovered by our forces, which succeeded not only in the capture of the garrison, but of one of the enemy's vessels of war, which was carried by boarding parties from merchant river steamers. Our fortified positions have everywhere been much strengthened and improved, affording assurance of our ability to meet with success the utmost efforts of our enemies, in spite of the magnitude of their preparations for attack. A review of our history of the two years of our national
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 112
nate and House of Representatives of the Confederate States: at the date of your last adjournment pride surely not unbecoming, that these confederate States have added another to the lessons taughttheir displeasure if it should treat the confederate States as having an independent existence. It spired among the commercial classes of the United States by a single cruiser of the Confederacy. O. Neutral Europe remained passive when the United States--with a naval force insufficient to blockaared with this monstrous pretension of the United States, the blockades known in history under the e of the war between Great Britain and the United States in 1812; yet those blockades were one of tstponement was obviously beneficial to the United States and detrimental to the Confederacy. It wao the superior military authorities of the United States, with but faint hope that they will evincehe uses to which the dominant party in the United States intended from the beginning to apply their[33 more...]
Turquie (Turkey) (search for this): chapter 112
ess to the blockaded port evidently dangerous, or whether it was further required for its legality that it should be sufficient really to prevent access, and numerous other similar questions, had remained doubtful and undecided. Animated by the highly honorable desire to put an end to differences of opinion between neutrals and belligerents which may occasion serious difficulties and even conflicts — I quote the official language — the five great powers of Europe, together with Sardinia and Turkey, adopted, in 1856, the following solemn declaration of principles: Firstly. Privateering is and remains abolished. Secondly. The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war. Thirdly. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag. Fourthly. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Fredericksburgh (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 112
e simultaneous advances on our frontiers on the western rivers and on the Atlantic coast in masses so great as to evince their hope of overbearing all resistance by mere weight of number. This hope, however, like those previously entertained by our foes, vanished. In Virginia, their fourth attempt at invasion by armies whose assured success was confidently predicted, has met with decisive repulse. Our noble defenders, under the consummate leadership of their General, have again, at Fredericksburgh, inflicted on the forces under General Burnside the like disastrous overthrow as had been previously suffered by the successive invading armies commanded by Generals McDowell, McClellan, and Pope. In the West, obstinate battles have been fought with varied fortunes, marked by frightful carnage on both sides; but the enemy's hopes of decisive results have again been baffled, while at Vicksburgh another formidable expedition has been repulsed, with inconsiderable loss on our side, and
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