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Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
ies--the First Maine, Lieut. Bradbury; one section of the Fourth Massachusetts, under Lieut. Briggs, and Capt. W. W. Carruth's Sixth Massachusetts--had gone round by the woods, from Patersonville, to a point above the Cotton, where they could successfully play upon her, and in this they were assisted by some of the One Hundred and Sixtieth New-York, and sixty sharp-shooters of the Seventy-fifth New-York, who played havoc among the crew of the rebel gunboat, which was one of those enormous Mississippi steamers, protected by cotton wherever possible, and clad in iron. Thrice did this ungainly monster retire up the bayou, from the effect of the deadly iron hail poured into her, and thrice did she desperately come up to renew the contest. She came once too often, however; for, after having had her men nearly cleaned out of her, the last time she made her appearance, which was at two o'clock next morning, she was floating, in solitary glory, down the bayou, one sheet of flame. The g
Brashear City (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
me is crossed by the New-Orleans, Ope lousas and Great Western Railroad, which extends at present, no further than to Brashear City and Berwick's Bay, at the junction of the Atchafalaya River and Lake Palondre. For the benefit of those of your retch, with a portion of the Seventy-fifth New-York, volunteered as sharp-shooters. The troops commenced embarking from Brashear on Monday night; by Tuesday morning they had all safely embarked, and the whole of the infantry — placed upon our gunboae expedition accomplished, our gunboats and land forces returned in perfect order and good spirits, and arrived opposite Brashear at five o'clock on the evening of Friday, sixteenth, in one of the most terrible Northers that I ever witnessed. They csocial consideration, who once run for Senator against Benjamin. The rebel loss is not known; but two women who came to Brashear under flag of truce, say they knew of fifteen buried. Although the ostensible object of this expedition was carried o
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 115
t present, no further than to Brashear City and Berwick's Bay, at the junction of the Atchafalaya River and Lake Palondre. For the benefit of those of your readers who may not know — and perhaps there are many such — any thing about these extraordinary bayous, or water-courses, it may be well to state that, although when compared with the mighty Mississippi, they sink to the insignificance of mere streamlets — many of them far exceed in volume the river Thames, a very short distance above London,--and the smallest of them would, in any part of England, be considered a very respectable river. Although not positively known, it had been, for some time past, pretty generally rumored that an expedition of some sort was about to take place in the neighborhood of Berwick's Bay, but when or how no one could tell. All that we knew was that the rebels were collecting forces above Donaldsonville, in the neighborhood of Plaquemine, that they now and then came in collision with our pickets, <
New Iberia (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
e, the rebels looked upon as worth an army of twenty thousand to them, and captured a large quantity of cattle, horses, and mules; but then, the obstruction in the bayou still remains; they have at least two other boats up there getting ready; we have come back to precisely the point from which we started, and I see nothing to prevent us from having to go over exactly the same work again. Had we gone on and taken Franklin — held the ground as we went on, and never stopped till we seized New-Iberia, and with it the mountain of salt on Petite Anse Island--(miles long by miles in width of solid rock salt, capable of supplying the world)--worth more than an army to the rebels, in their present condition, there would have been something to record really worth crowing over. But of one thing we are all confident here, General Weitzel is capable of any thing he may be set to do; and so let us indulge in the hope of soon recording something of more lasting and important results in the distr
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
Teche, La. New-York times account. Lafourche Station, Friday, January 16, 1868. we have just arrived here with Gen. Weitzel and the larger number of the forces under him, who are encamped at Thibodeaux, near this place, having accompanied them from their successful expedition up the Bayou Teche, in which they destroyed the rebel gunboat Cotton, and sent the enemy skedaddling. If you have moral courage enough to examine any detailed hydrographical and topographical map of Southern Louisiana, and lose yourself among the labyrinthine intersections of the countless lakes and bayous there represented — resembling more the plan of a spider's web than any portion of the habitable globe — you will find the Lafourche Station just where the bayou of that name is crossed by the New-Orleans, Ope lousas and Great Western Railroad, which extends at present, no further than to Brashear City and Berwick's Bay, at the junction of the Atchafalaya River and Lake Palondre. For the benefi
Pelican (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
lholland, Co. E, Seventy-fifth New-York; Peter Richards, Co. A, Twelfth Connecticut, finger, slightly. On board the Diana I afterward met and conversed with a rebel lieutenant, who was made prisoner. He told us that their forces did not consist (independently of the Cotton) of more than one thousand one hundred, namely, Four, net's Yellow jacket battalion, of some three hundred men, of which he was a member, and eight hundred of the Twenty-eighth Louisiana; also, Simms's battery and the Pelican battery of Parrott guns, the same who fought us at Donaldsonville and Lapataville. Colonel Gray was commander of the post, a man of some social consideration, who once run for Senator against Benjamin. The rebel loss is not known; but two women who came to Brashear under flag of truce, say they knew of fifteen buried. Although the ostensible object of this expedition was carried out as clearly and prettily as any one could desire, and bravery was shown there equal to any thing experien
Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
, for some time past, pretty generally rumored that an expedition of some sort was about to take place in the neighborhood of Berwick's Bay, but when or how no one could tell. All that we knew was that the rebels were collecting forces above Donaldsonville, in the neighborhood of Plaquemine, that they now and then came in collision with our pickets, run off all the horses, mules, and cattle they could lay their hands on, and that they, moreover, had a steamer, called the J. A. Cotton, lurking sdred, namely, Four, net's Yellow jacket battalion, of some three hundred men, of which he was a member, and eight hundred of the Twenty-eighth Louisiana; also, Simms's battery and the Pelican battery of Parrott guns, the same who fought us at Donaldsonville and Lapataville. Colonel Gray was commander of the post, a man of some social consideration, who once run for Senator against Benjamin. The rebel loss is not known; but two women who came to Brashear under flag of truce, say they knew of fi
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 115
Bay, at the junction of the Atchafalaya River and Lake Palondre. For the benefit of those of your readers who may not know — and perhaps there are many such — any thing about these extraordinary bayous, or water-courses, it may be well to state that, although when compared with the mighty Mississippi, they sink to the insignificance of mere streamlets — many of them far exceed in volume the river Thames, a very short distance above London,--and the smallest of them would, in any part of England, be considered a very respectable river. Although not positively known, it had been, for some time past, pretty generally rumored that an expedition of some sort was about to take place in the neighborhood of Berwick's Bay, but when or how no one could tell. All that we knew was that the rebels were collecting forces above Donaldsonville, in the neighborhood of Plaquemine, that they now and then came in collision with our pickets, run off all the horses, mules, and cattle they could lay<
Estrella (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
an killed, and they several. At three P. M., Commodore Buchanan, commander of the fleet of gunboats, steamed up the river on board the Diana, and returned at a quarter to four o'clock. At half-past 4 o'clock the Calhoun, (flag-ship,) Kinsman, Estrella, and Diana all went up the bayou, came to anchor about ten miles below where the bayou was obstructed, made a hawser fast from each quarter to the shore, and staid all night. Early on Wednesday morning, at six A. M., the Diana, Capt. Goodwin, was ordered to go down the Bayou to Lynch's Point, to take the Eighth Vermont across to the left or northern bank, in order for a flank movement on the enemy. At seven, the Calhoun, Commodore Buchanan, Kinsman, Captain Wiggin, and Estrella, Captain Cook, commenced moving slowly up the bayou, and at eight o'clock reached the formidable obstruction. This was at a place called Corney's Bridge, from a man of that name owning a plantation there. Nothing but the piles of the old bridge remain, pro
Bainbridge (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
the Bayou Teche, which had become the terror of that part of the country. It became, therefore, simply necessary to go and clean them out, and the task was allotted to General Weitzel. The General commenced moving his forces from Thibodeaux on Sunday, the eleventh. These consisted of the Eighth Vermont, One Hundred and Sixtieth and Seventy-fifth New-York, Twelfth Connecticut, Twenty-first Indiana, Sixth Michigan, company B, First Louisiana Union cavalry, Capt. Barrett; four pieces of Bainbridge's artillery, Sixth Massachusetts battery, Capt. W. W. Carruth; First Maine battery, Lieut. Bradley, and one section Fourth Massachusetts battery, Lieutenant Briggs. Capt. Fitch, with a portion of the Seventy-fifth New-York, volunteered as sharp-shooters. The troops commenced embarking from Brashear on Monday night; by Tuesday morning they had all safely embarked, and the whole of the infantry — placed upon our gunboats Calhoun, Diana, Kinsman, and Estrella--proceeded up the Atchafalaya
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