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France (France) (search for this): chapter 126
erior force of the confederate States from and after this thirty-first day of January, A. D. 1863. G. T. Beauregard, General Commanding. D. N. Ingraham, Flag-Officer Commanding Naval Forces in South-Carolina. Official: Thomas Jordan Chief of Staff. Secretary Benjamin's circular. The following is a copy of the circular addressed by Secretary Benjamin to the foreign consuls in the Confederacy: Department of State, Richmond, Jan. 31, 1863. Monsieur Bettancourt, Consular Agent of France, at Wilmington, N. C.: sir: I am instructed by the President of the confederate States of America to inform you that this government has received an official despatch from Flag-Officer Ingraham, commanding the naval forces of the Confederacy on the coast of South-Carolina, stating that the blockade of the harbor of Charleston has been broken by the complete dispersion and disappearance of the blockading squadron, in consequence of a successful attack made on it by the iron-clad steamers c
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
ered to Port Royal for repairs. The Unadilla returned to her usual anchorage after communicating with the senior officer, where she remained during the day. Two small tug-boats remained apparently in attendance on the rams, under cover of Forts Moultrie and Beauregard. The prize steamer Princess Royal, which had been alongside the Housatonic, was despatched to Port Royal one hour and a half after the rams had retired to the cover of the batteries, and the firing had ceased, or about half- time was almost surrounded by the enemy's vessels. At eight A. M., there being no more of the abolition fleet in sight, we stood back to the entrance of Beach channels, having signalled the Chicora to return. On passing, we were saluted by Forts Moultrie, Sumter, and Ripley, and arrived at the wharf, in the city, a little before six P. M. The Chicora, Captain John R. Turner, started from her wharf at half-past 11 o'clock, Friday night, and crossed the bar at half-past 4 A. M. We commenced
Land's End, South-carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
ard the Housatonic that forenoon, soon after the firing ended, and the blockade continued as before. No vessel ran in or out of the port that day, nor was any attempt made to run the blockade. The Keystone State was necessarily ordered to Port Royal for repairs. The Unadilla returned to her usual anchorage after communicating with the senior officer, where she remained during the day. Two small tug-boats remained apparently in attendance on the rams, under cover of Forts Moultrie and Beauregard. The prize steamer Princess Royal, which had been alongside the Housatonic, was despatched to Port Royal one hour and a half after the rams had retired to the cover of the batteries, and the firing had ceased, or about half-past 9 A. M. These are the facts, and we do not hesitate to state that no vessel did come out beyond the bar after the return of the rams, at between seven and eight A. M., to the cover of the forts. We believe the statement that any vessel came anywhere near the
Fort Ripley (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
aving us far astern. One or two shots were exchanged with the United States frigate Powhatan. The latter, however, followed the example of her companions, and fled. We then stood northward, toward the Chicora, which at this time was almost surrounded by the enemy's vessels. At eight A. M., there being no more of the abolition fleet in sight, we stood back to the entrance of Beach channels, having signalled the Chicora to return. On passing, we were saluted by Forts Moultrie, Sumter, and Ripley, and arrived at the wharf, in the city, a little before six P. M. The Chicora, Captain John R. Turner, started from her wharf at half-past 11 o'clock, Friday night, and crossed the bar at half-past 4 A. M. We commenced action at five minutes past five. The Palmetto State engaged an abolition vessel on the right, while we engaged the one on the left. As we passed the blockader on the right, the Palmetto State was lying alongside of her. Keeping on our course, we proceeded to within fifty
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 126
d, and informed me that the vessel was the United States steamer Mercedita, Commander Stellwagen, aVa. Report of Commander Tucker. confederate States steamer Chicora, January 31, 1863. sis naval force on this station attacked the United States blockading fleet off the harbor of the citereby formally declare the blockade by the United States of the said city of Charleston, South-Caro to be raised by a superior force of the confederate States from and after this thirty-first day of instructed by the President of the confederate States of America to inform you that this governmenton. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. United States steam frigate New Ironsides, off Charlestoamer Housatonic. J. H. Strong, Commanding United States Steamer Flag. Jas. Mad. Frailet, Commanding United States Steamer Quaker City. E. G. Parrott, Commanding United States Steamer Augusta. P. minutes past five A. M., we came up to the United States steamer Mercedita, and was hailed by the w[12 more...]
Morehead City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
f the blockading fleet, and that not a single vessel could be seen, even with the aid of powerful glasses, and that consequently the blockade had been most effectually raised; and knowing, as we do, the above statement to be utterly false in every particular, we feel constrained to tender our evidence, as corroborative of that already furnished. On the evening of January twenty-ninth, the One Hundred and Seventy-sixth regiment Pennsylvania militia (with which we are connected) left Morehead City, N. C., on board the steamer Cossack, destined for Port Royal. Upon the morning of the thirty-first, when nigh Charleston, we could hear firing distinctly. Upon our arrival off the harbor, which was at about half-past 8 in the morning, we found lying there the blockading squadron, some of which were at anchor, and also the prize steamer Princess Royal. The distance from land at which they were was estimated to be from four to five miles, and although the morning was somewhat hazy, yet the
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
r Augusta. P. G. Watmough, Commanding United States Steamer Memphis. C. J. Van Alstine, Commanding United States Steamer Stettin. headquarters one hundred and Seventy-Sixth Regt., Pennsylvania militia, St. Helena Island, S. C., February 21, 1863. sir: Having seen a proclamation issued by Gen. Beauregard and Commodore Ingraham, to the effect that upon the morning of the thirty-first ult., they had, by force of arms, succeeded in dispersing the blockading fleet which was lying off Charleston harbor, and also a statement purporting to have come from the English Consul at that port, and the commanding officer of the English man-of-war Petrel, that they had gone out to a point five miles beyond the usual anchorage of the blockading fleet, and that not a single vessel could be seen, even with the aid of powerful glasses, and that consequently the blockade had been most effectually raised; and knowing, as we do, the above statement to be utterly false in every particular, we feel cons
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
e confederate States from and after this thirty-first day of January, A. D. 1863. G. T. Beauregard, General Commanding. D. N. Ingraham, Flag-Officer Commanding Naval Forces in South-Carolina. Official: Thomas Jordan Chief of Staff. Secretary Benjamin's circular. The following is a copy of the circular addressed by Secretary Benjamin to the foreign consuls in the Confederacy: Department of State, Richmond, Jan. 31, 1863. Monsieur Bettancourt, Consular Agent of France, at Wilmington, N. C.: sir: I am instructed by the President of the confederate States of America to inform you that this government has received an official despatch from Flag-Officer Ingraham, commanding the naval forces of the Confederacy on the coast of South-Carolina, stating that the blockade of the harbor of Charleston has been broken by the complete dispersion and disappearance of the blockading squadron, in consequence of a successful attack made on it by the iron-clad steamers commanded by Flag
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
not speak in too high terms. He was perfectly cool under the great responsibility he had in taking the vessel over at night with so great a draught, and during the action rendered me great assistance in pointing out the vessels as we approached them in the uncertain light. I send the reports of Commander Tucker and Lieutenant Commander Rutledge. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, D. N. Ingraham, Flag-Officer Commanding. Hon. S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy, Richmond, Va. Report of Commander Tucker. confederate States steamer Chicora, January 31, 1863. sir: In obedience to your order, I got under way at half-past 11 P. M. yesterday, and stood down the harbor, in company with the confederate States steamer Palmetto State, bearing your flag. We crossed the bar at twenty minutes to five A. M., and commenced the action at twenty minutes past five A. M.,by firing into a schooner-rigged propeller, which we set on fire, and have every reason to beli
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
ly three, one of which is on duty at a distance, and the other two the commanders of the two vessels which were sent to Port Royal to repair damages, and which were the only two which were injured, notwithstanding the report of the enemy in the Charl out of the port that day, nor was any attempt made to run the blockade. The Keystone State was necessarily ordered to Port Royal for repairs. The Unadilla returned to her usual anchorage after communicating with the senior officer, where she remaioultrie and Beauregard. The prize steamer Princess Royal, which had been alongside the Housatonic, was despatched to Port Royal one hour and a half after the rams had retired to the cover of the batteries, and the firing had ceased, or about half-ennsylvania militia (with which we are connected) left Morehead City, N. C., on board the steamer Cossack, destined for Port Royal. Upon the morning of the thirty-first, when nigh Charleston, we could hear firing distinctly. Upon our arrival off th
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