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Bloomfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
four too seriously to be removed. Leaving the dead and wounded to the neighborhood, and being now joined by the remainder of the command, we pushed forward to Bloomfield. Our road lay through the Big Mingo Swamp. Night was gathering around, and a drifting snow-storm swept in wild eddies through the deep forest — blinding horseorning. This was soon despatched — to horse sounded. Brushing the snow hastily from their saddles, the troop mounted, and we moved on through the darkness, to Bloomfield, yet fifteen miles distant. The snow still came down in great white flakes. Three hours brought us to the once charming capital of Stoddard County. The columnebels proved false — they having fell back to Chalk Bluffs some days previous; the rebel Provost-Marshal, one Sickle, from New-York, having fled with the rest. Bloomfield, once a flourishing town, presents a dreary and deserted appearance, its rebel proclivities have left the mark of Cain upon its once fair face. On the mornin<
Stoddard (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
t for an hour being ordered, while your correspondent sought the cheerful face of a blazing fire, in an ample chimney. The good dame soon prepared a snack, the first we had tasted since morning. This was soon despatched — to horse sounded. Brushing the snow hastily from their saddles, the troop mounted, and we moved on through the darkness, to Bloomfield, yet fifteen miles distant. The snow still came down in great white flakes. Three hours brought us to the once charming capital of Stoddard County. The column closed up and the order to charge into the town was given, and right gallantly was the charge made — a few minutes and every road was secured and house under our command. The report that a force of three hundred of the rebels proved false — they having fell back to Chalk Bluffs some days previous; the rebel Provost-Marshal, one Sickle, from New-York, having fled with the rest. Bloomfield, once a flourishing town, presents a dreary and deserted appearance, its rebel procli<
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
een miles distant. The snow still came down in great white flakes. Three hours brought us to the once charming capital of Stoddard County. The column closed up and the order to charge into the town was given, and right gallantly was the charge made — a few minutes and every road was secured and house under our command. The report that a force of three hundred of the rebels proved false — they having fell back to Chalk Bluffs some days previous; the rebel Provost-Marshal, one Sickle, from New-York, having fled with the rest. Bloomfield, once a flourishing town, presents a dreary and deserted appearance, its rebel proclivities have left the mark of Cain upon its once fair face. On the morning of the sixth instant, took up our line of march for Jackson, where the command arrived in safety, having accomplished a distance of two hundred miles in three days, and completely defeated a gang of desperadoes that have been a terror to South-east Missouri from the beginning of the war. T
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
e. A messenger was despatched to Major Reeder, and in a short time the head of our column was in sight. The crossing was soon effected without serious accident. It being impossible to bring wagons through the stream, they were ordered back to Jackson, and preparations made for a rapid movement on the stronghold of the rebels, under the immediate command of the notorious guerrilla chief Dan McGee, said to number sixty men, stationed, as they supposed, in an impenetrable swamp to any thing in fled with the rest. Bloomfield, once a flourishing town, presents a dreary and deserted appearance, its rebel proclivities have left the mark of Cain upon its once fair face. On the morning of the sixth instant, took up our line of march for Jackson, where the command arrived in safety, having accomplished a distance of two hundred miles in three days, and completely defeated a gang of desperadoes that have been a terror to South-east Missouri from the beginning of the war. The officers
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
Doc. 117.-fight at Mingo swamp, Mo. Missouri Democrat account. St. Louis, February 16, 1863. on the morning of the second of February, detachments from seven companies of the Twelfth were ordered to form a junction at Dallas, Missouri, on the night of the second instant, which was done by nine P. M. During the night small parties scoured the country south and west, as low down as Castor, which it was found impossible to ford just then. In the course of the morning our parties camg of the sixth instant, took up our line of march for Jackson, where the command arrived in safety, having accomplished a distance of two hundred miles in three days, and completely defeated a gang of desperadoes that have been a terror to South-east Missouri from the beginning of the war. The officers and men behaved throughout with credit to themselves and the army. Major Reeder, Adjutant Macklind, W. Pape, Lieut. Chaveaux, and Capt. Bangs, deserve especial notice for their coolness and e
Mingo Swamp (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
Doc. 117.-fight at Mingo swamp, Mo. Missouri Democrat account. St. Louis, February 16, 1863. on the morning of the second of February, detachments from seven companies of the Twelfth were ordered to form a junction at Dallas, Missouri, on the night of the second instant, which was done by nine P. M. During the night small parties scoured the country south and west, as low down as Castor, which it was found impossible to ford just then. In the course of the morning our parties came in with a number of prisoners, and twenty saddles that had been concealed in the woods by the rebels. Being somewhat decayed, they were burned. At eight A. M. on the morning of the third instant, Major Reeder having learned that the enemy were in the neighborhood of Big Mingo, gave the order to fall in, determined by a forced march to surprise the rebels. When six miles from the ford, at Bolling's Mill, Adjutant Macklind was ordered forward, with twelve men, to try the ford and to secure an
Dallas (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
Doc. 117.-fight at Mingo swamp, Mo. Missouri Democrat account. St. Louis, February 16, 1863. on the morning of the second of February, detachments from seven companies of the Twelfth were ordered to form a junction at Dallas, Missouri, on the night of the second instant, which was done by nine P. M. During the night small parties scoured the country south and west, as low down as Castor, which it was found impossible to ford just then. In the course of the morning our parties came in with a number of prisoners, and twenty saddles that had been concealed in the woods by the rebels. Being somewhat decayed, they were burned. At eight A. M. on the morning of the third instant, Major Reeder having learned that the enemy were in the neighborhood of Big Mingo, gave the order to fall in, determined by a forced march to surprise the rebels. When six miles from the ford, at Bolling's Mill, Adjutant Macklind was ordered forward, with twelve men, to try the ford and to secure any
B. F. Lazear (search for this): chapter 127
hal, one Sickle, from New-York, having fled with the rest. Bloomfield, once a flourishing town, presents a dreary and deserted appearance, its rebel proclivities have left the mark of Cain upon its once fair face. On the morning of the sixth instant, took up our line of march for Jackson, where the command arrived in safety, having accomplished a distance of two hundred miles in three days, and completely defeated a gang of desperadoes that have been a terror to South-east Missouri from the beginning of the war. The officers and men behaved throughout with credit to themselves and the army. Major Reeder, Adjutant Macklind, W. Pape, Lieut. Chaveaux, and Capt. Bangs, deserve especial notice for their coolness and efficiency. I shall long remember the gallant Major's Close up! Close up! through that dreary night march; and the many courtesies shown me by the officers and men of the command, not forgetting their gallant and efficient commander, Lieut.-Colonel B. F. Lazear. H.
neighborhood of Big Mingo, gave the order to fall in, determined by a forced march to surprise the rebels. When six miles from the ford, at Bolling's Mill, Adjutant Macklind was ordered forward, with twelve men, to try the ford and to secure any parties in the vicinity. Wishing to see the result, I joined the party. A sharp gal. The command, Draw pistols — prepare to charge! passed along the line. In a moment all were ready, when a sudden turn in the road discovered to Major Reeder, Macklind, and Lieutenant Chaveaux, in the advance, the presence of the enemy at a few hundred yards distance. Charge! rang sharp and clear on the winter air, and we wererror to South-east Missouri from the beginning of the war. The officers and men behaved throughout with credit to themselves and the army. Major Reeder, Adjutant Macklind, W. Pape, Lieut. Chaveaux, and Capt. Bangs, deserve especial notice for their coolness and efficiency. I shall long remember the gallant Major's Close up!
the vicinity of Sim. Cato's, the headquarters of the guerrillas. The command, Draw pistols — prepare to charge! passed along the line. In a moment all were ready, when a sudden turn in the road discovered to Major Reeder, Macklind, and Lieutenant Chaveaux, in the advance, the presence of the enemy at a few hundred yards distance. Charge! rang sharp and clear on the winter air, and we were upon them. They grasped their arms in vain — in vain they sought to mount their horses. Our men werletely defeated a gang of desperadoes that have been a terror to South-east Missouri from the beginning of the war. The officers and men behaved throughout with credit to themselves and the army. Major Reeder, Adjutant Macklind, W. Pape, Lieut. Chaveaux, and Capt. Bangs, deserve especial notice for their coolness and efficiency. I shall long remember the gallant Major's Close up! Close up! through that dreary night march; and the many courtesies shown me by the officers and men of the co
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